Stories of king arthurs knights

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ProjectGutenberg'sStoriesofKingArthur'sKnights,byMaryMacGregor ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.net Title:StoriesofKingArthur'sKnights ToldtotheChildrenbyMaryMacGregor Author:MaryMacGregor Editor:LoueyChisholm Illustrator:KatharineCameron ReleaseDate:May31,2008[EBook#25654] Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKSTORIESOFKINGARTHUR'SKNIGHTS*** ProducedbyChrisCurnow,LindyWalsh,SuzanFlanaganand theOnlineDistributedProofreadingTeamat http://www.pgdp.net TOLDTOTHECHILDRENSERIES EDITEDBYLOUEYCHISHOLM KINGARTHUR’S KNIGHTS TO MARIEWINIFRED BESIDEHERSTOODHERBEAUTIFULDAUGHTER Page7 STORIESOF KingArthur’sKnights TOLDTOTHECHILDRENBY MARYMACGREGOR WITHPICTURESBY KATHARINECAMERON Childrenreading LONDON:T C &E C JACK NEWYORK:E P DUTTON&CO ABOUTTHISBOOK MorethanfourhundredyearsagotherelivedadiligentmancalledSirThomas Malory, who wrote in English words many of the beautiful Welsh tales about KingArthur’sKnights,thatthepeopleofWaleslovedsowell All the stories in this little book were found in Malory’s big book, except ‘GeraintandEnid.’Butit,too,isoneoftheoldWelshtalesthattellofthebrave knightsandfairladiesofKingArthur’scourt Many times,since SirThomasMalorywrotehisbook,havethesestoriesbeen toldagaintooldandyoung,butperhapsneverbeforehavetheybeentoldtothe childrensosimplyasinthislittlebook MARYMACGREGOR LISTOFSTORIES GeraintandEnid, LancelotandElaine, PelleasandEttarde, GarethandLynette, SirGalahadandtheSacred Cup, TheDeathofKingArthur, PAGE 29 45 61 88 107 LISTOFPICTURES GERAINTANDENID Besideherstoodherbeautifuldaughter, ThroughwoodsandswampsEnidand Geraintrode silently, LANCELOTANDELAINE TheLilyMaidofAstolat, PELLEASANDETTARDE SirPelleaswasalwaysathislady’sside, GARETHANDLYNETTE Sometimesthebirdsandbeasts,his woodland friends,wouldcalltohim, TheLadyLyonors, SIRGALAHADANDTHESACREDCUP ‘Mystrengthisasthestrengthoften Becausemyheartispure,’ THEDEATHOFKINGARTHUR, Frontispiece Atpage 20 44 50 62 84 102 114 GERAINTANDENID QueenGuineverelayidlyinbeddreamingbeautifuldreams Thesunnymorning hourswereslippingaway,butshewassohappyindreamland,thatshedidnot rememberthatherlittlemaidhadcalledherlongago ButtheQueen’sdreamscametoanendatlast,andallatoncesheremembered thatthiswasthemorningshehadpromisedtogotothehuntwithKingArthur Eveninthehunting-field,theKingwasnotquitehappyifhisbeautifulQueen Guinevere were not there This morning he had waited for her in vain, for in dreamlandtheQueenhadforgottenallaboutthehunt ‘IfIdressquickly,Ishallnotbeverylate,’thoughttheQueen,assheheardthe far-offsoundofthehunting-horn Andshewassoquickthatinaveryshorttime sheandherlittlewaiting-maidwereout,andridinguptoagrassyknoll Butthe huntsmen were already far away ‘We will wait here to see them ride homewards,’saidtheQueen,andtheydrewuptheirhorsestowatchandlisten They had not waited long, when they heard the sound of horse’s hoofs, and turning round, the Queen saw Prince Geraint, one of Arthur’s knights He was unarmed,exceptthathisswordhungathisside Heworeasuitofsilk,witha purple sash round his waist, and at each end of the sash was a golden apple, whichsparkledinthesunlight ‘Youarelateforthehunt,PrinceGeraint,’saidtheQueen ‘Likeyou,Ihavecome,nottojointhehunt,buttoseeitpass,’saidthePrince, bowinglowtothebeautifulQueen Andheaskedtobeallowedtowaitwithher andthelittlemaid Astheywaited,threepeople,alady,aknightandadwarf,cameoutoftheforest, androdeslowlypast Theknighthadhishelmetoff,andtheQueensawthathe lookedyoungandbold ‘IcannotrememberifheisoneofArthur’sknights Imustknowhisname,’she said Andshesentherlittlemaidtofindoutwhothestrangeknightwas Butwhenthelittlemaidaskedthedwarfhismaster’sname,thedwarfanswered rudelythathewouldnottellher ‘ThenIwillaskyourmasterhimself,’saidthemaid Butasshesteppedtowards theknight,thedwarfstruckherwithhiswhip,andthelittlemaid,half-angryand half-frightened, hurried back to the Queen, and told her how the dwarf had treatedher Prince Geraint was angry when he heard how rude the dwarf had been to the Queen’s little messenger, and said that he would go and find out the knight’s name But the dwarf, by his master’s orders, treated the Prince as rudely as he had treatedthelittlemaid WhenGeraintfeltthedwarf’swhipstrikehischeek,and sawtheblooddroppingontohispurplesash,hefeltfortheswordathisside Thenherememberedthatwhilehewastallandstrong,thedwarfwassmalland weak,andhescornedtotouchhim GoingbacktotheQueen,Gerainttoldherthathehadnotbeenabletofindout theknight’snameeither,‘butwithyourleave,Iwillfollowhimtohishome,and compelhimtoaskyourpardon,’saidthePrince AndtheQueenallowedhimto followtheknight ‘Whenyoucomeback,youwillperhapsbringabridewithyou,’saidtheQueen ‘If she be a great lady, or if she be only a beggar-maid, I will dress her in beautifulrobes,andsheshallstandamongthefairestladiesofmycourt.’ ‘InthreedaysIshallcomeback,ifIamnotslaininbattlewiththeknight,’said Geraint And he rode away, a little sorry not to hear the merry sound of the hunter’shorn,andalittlevexedthathehadundertakenthisstrangeadventure Through valleys and over hills Geraint followed the lady, the knight and the dwarf,tillatlast,intheevening,hesawthemgothroughthenarrowstreetsofa littletown,andreachawhitefortress Intothisfortressthelady,theknightand thedwarfdisappeared ‘Ishallfindtheknightthereto-morrow,’thoughtGeraint‘NowImustgotoan innforfoodandabed,’forhewashungryandtiredafterhislongride But all the inns in the little town were full, and every one seemed too busy to takeanynoticeofthestranger ‘Why is there such a bustle in your town this evening?’ asked Geraint, first of one person and then of another But they hurried past him, muttering, ‘The Sparrow-hawkhashistournamenthereto-morrow.’ ‘The Sparrow-hawk! that is a strange name,’ thought Geraint But he did not knowthatthiswasoneofthenamesoftheknighthehadfollowedsofar Soon Geraint reached a smithy, and he looked in, and saw that the smith was busysharpeningswordsandspears ‘Iwillgoinandbuyarms,’thoughtGeraint And because the smith saw that the stranger was dressed like a Prince, he stoppedhisworkforamomenttospeaktohim ‘Arms?’hesaid,whenGerainttoldhimwhathewanted ‘Therearenoarmsto spare,fortheSparrow-hawkholdshistournamenthereto-morrow.’ ‘TheSparrow-hawkagain!’thoughtGeraint ‘Iwonderwhohecanbe.’Thenhe turnedtothesmithagainandsaid,‘Thoughyoucannotgivemearms,perhaps youcantellmewheretofindfoodandabed.’ ‘The old Earl Yniol might give you shelter He lives in that half-ruined castle across the bridge,’ said the smith And he turned again to his work, muttering, ‘ThosewhoworkfortheSparrow-hawkhavenotimetowasteintalk.’ So Geraint rode wearily on across the bridge and reached the castle The courtyardwasquiteemptyandlookedverydreary,foritwasallovergrownwith weedsandthistles Atthedoorofthehalf-ruinedcastlestoodtheoldEarl ‘Itisgrowinglate Willyounotcomeinandrest,’saidEarlYniol,‘althoughthe castlebebare,andthefaresimple?’ And Geraint said he would like to stay there, for he was so hungry that the plainestfoodwouldseemafeast Asheenteredthecastle,heheardsomeonesinging Thesongwassobeautiful, and the voice was so pure and clear, that Geraint thought it was the sweetest songinalltheworld,andtheoldcastleseemedlessgloomyashelistened Then Earl Yniol led Geraint into a long low room, and this room was both dining-roomandkitchen TheEarl’swifesatthere,andsheworeadressthatmusthavebeenverygrand once,butnowitwasold AndGalahadwaitedattheabbey,fortheKinghadsaidhewouldsendhissquire totelltheyoungknighthowtheshieldhadprotectedhim FortwomilestheKingrodethroughthevalley,tillhereachedahermitage And hesawawarriorthere,dressedinwhitearmour,andsittingonawhitehorse ThewarriorrodequicklytowardstheKing,andstruckhimsohardthathebroke hisarmour ThenhethrusthisspearthroughtheKing’srightshoulder,asthough heheldnoshield ‘Theshieldcanbeborneonlybyapeerlessknight Itdoesnotbelongtoyou,’ said the warrior, as he gave it to the squire, telling him to carry it back to the abbeyandtogiveittoSirGalahadwithhisgreeting ‘Thentellmeyourname,’saidthesquire ‘I will tell neither you nor any one on earth,’ said the warrior And he disappeared,andthesquiresawhimnomore ‘I will take the wounded King to an abbey, that his wounds may be dressed,’ thoughtthesquire And with great difficulty the King and his squire reached an abbey And the monksthoughthislifecouldnotbesaved,butaftermanydayshewascured ThenthesquirerodebacktotheabbeywhereGalahadwaited ‘Thewarriorwho woundedtheKingbidsyoubearthisshield,’hesaid Galahadhungtheshieldroundhisneckjoyfully,androdeintothevalleytoseek thewarriordressedinwhite Andwhentheymettheysalutedeachothercourteously AndthewarriortoldSir Galahadstrangetalesofthewhiteshield,tilltheknightthankedGodthatnowit washis Andallhislifelongthewhiteshieldwiththeredcrosswasoneofhis greattreasures NowGalahadrodebacktotheabbey,andthemonksweregladtoseehimagain ‘Wehaveneedofapureknight,’theysaid,astheytookSirGalahadtoatombin thechurchyard Apitifulnoisewasheard,andavoicefromthetombcried,‘Galahad,servantof God, not come near me.’ But the young knight went towards the tomb and raisedthestone Then a thick smoke was seen, and through the smoke a figure uglier than any manleapedfromthetomb,shouting,‘Angelsareroundthee,Galahad,servantof God Icandoyounoharm.’ Theknightstoopeddownandsawabodyalldressedinarmourlyingthere,anda swordlaybyitsside ‘Thiswasafalseknight,’saidSirGalahad ‘Letuscarryhisbodyawayfromthis place.’ ‘Youwillstayintheabbeyandlivewithus,’entreatedthemonks Buttheboyknightcouldnotrest Wouldheseethelightthatwasbrighterthananysunbeam again?WouldhisadventuresbringhimatlasttotheHolyGrail? Sir Galahad rode on many days, till at last he reached a mountain On the mountainhefoundanoldchapel Itwasemptyandverydesolate Galahadknelt alonebeforethealtar,andaskedGodtotellhimwhattodonext Andasheprayedavoicesaid,‘Thoubraveknight,gototheCastleofMaidens andrescuethem.’ Galahadrose,andgladlyjourneyedontotheCastleofMaidens Therehefoundsevenknights,wholongagohadseizedthecastlefromamaiden to whom it belonged And these knights had imprisoned her and many other maidens WhenthesevenknightssawSirGalahadtheycameoutofthecastle ‘Wewill takethisyoungknightcaptive,andkeephiminprison,’theysaidtoeachother, astheyfelluponhim ButSirGalahadsmotethefirstknighttotheground,sothathealmostbrokehis neck Andashiswonderfulswordflashedinthelight,suddenfearfellonthesix knightsthatwereleft,andtheyturnedandfled ThenanoldmantookthekeysofthecastletoGalahad Andtheknightopened thegatesofthecastle,andsetfreemanyprisoners Hegavethecastlebackto themaidentowhomitbelonged,andsentforalltheknightsinthecountryround abouttodoherhomage ThenonceagainSirGalahadrodeoninsearchoftheHolyGrail Andtheway seemedlong,yetonandonherode,tillatlasthereachedthesea There,ontheshore,stoodamaiden,andwhenshesawSirGalahad,sheledhim toashipandtoldhimtoenter “MYSTRENGTHISASTHESTRENGTHOFTENBECAUSEMYHEARTISPURE”Page88 Page88 The wind rose and drove the ship, with Sir Galahad on board, between two rocks Butwhentheshipcouldnotpassthatway,theknightleftit,andentereda smalleronethatawaitedhim Inthisshipwasatable,andonthetable,coveredwitharedcloth,wastheHoly Grail Reverently Sir Galahad sank on his knees But still the Sacred Cup was covered Atlasttheshipreachedastrangecity,andontheshoresatacrippledman Sir Galahadaskedhishelptoliftthetablefromtheship ‘FortenyearsIhavenotwalkedwithoutcrutches,’saidtheman ‘Showthatyouarewilling,andcometome,’urgedtheknight And the cripple got up, and when he found that he was cured, he ran to Sir Galahad,andtogethertheycarriedthewonderfultabletotheshore Thenallthecitywasastonished,andthepeopletalkedonlyofthegreatmarvel ‘Themanthatwasacripplefortenyearscanwalk,’eachsaidtotheother The King of the city heard the wonderful tale, but he was a cruel King and a tyrant ‘Theknightisnotagoodman,’hesaidtohispeople,andhecommanded thatGalahadshouldbeputinprison Andtheprisonwasunderneaththepalace, anditwasdarkandcoldthere But down into the darkness streamed the light that had made Galahad so glad longagoatCamelot AndinthelightGalahadsawtheHolyGrail A year passed and the cruel King was very ill, and he thought he would die Thenherememberedtheknighthehadtreatedsounkindly,andwhowasstillin thedark,coldprison ‘Iwillsendforhim,andaskhimtoforgiveme,’murmured theKing And when Galahad was brought to the palace, he willingly forgave the tyrant whohadputhiminprison ThentheKingdied,andtherewasgreatdismayinthecity,forwherewouldthey findagoodrulertositonthethrone? Astheywondered,theyheardavoicethattoldthemtomakeSirGalahadtheir King,andingreatjoytheknightwascrowned ThenthenewKingorderedaboxofgoldandpreciousstonestobemade,andin thisboxheplacedthewonderfultablehehadcarriedawayfromtheship ‘And everymorningIandmypeoplewillcomeheretopray,’hesaid ForayearSirGalahadruledthecountrywellandwisely ‘AyearagotheycrownedmeKing,’thoughtGalahadgravely,ashewokeone morning Hewouldgetupearly,andgotoprayattheprecioustable ButbeforetheKingreachedthetablehepaused Itwasearly Surelyallthecity wasasleep Yetsomeonewasalreadythere,kneelingbeforethetableonwhich, uncovered,stoodtheSacredCup Themankneelingtherelookedholyasthesaintslook Surroundinghimwasa circleofangels Wasitasaintwhokneeled,orwasittheLordHimself? When the man saw Sir Galahad, he said, ‘Come near, thou servant of Jesus Christ,andthoushaltseewhatthouhastsomuchlongedtosee.’ AndwithjoySirGalahadsawagaintheHolyGrail Thenashekneeledbeforeit inprayer,hissoullefthisbodyandwascarriedbyangelsintoheaven THEDEATHOFKINGARTHUR It was not to win renown that King Arthur had gone far across the sea, for he lovedhisowncountrysowell,thattogaingloryathomemadehimhappiestof all Butafalseknightwithhisfollowerswaslayingwastethecountryacrossthesea, andArthurhadgonetowagewaragainsthim ‘Andyou,SirModred,willrulethecountrywhileIamgone,’theKinghadsaid Andtheknightsmiledashethoughtofthepowerthatwouldbehis AtfirstthepeoplemissedtheirgreatKingArthur,butasthemonthspassedthey begantoforgethim,andtotalkonlyofSirModredandhisways And he, that he might gain the people’s praise, made easier laws than ever Arthurhaddone,tillbyandbythereweremanyinthecountrywhowishedthat theKingwouldnevercomeback WhenModredknewwhatthepeoplewished,hewasglad,andhemadeuphis mindtodoacrueldeed Hewouldcauseletterstobewrittenfrombeyondthesea,andtheletterswould tellthatthegreatKingArthurhadbeenslaininbattle And when the letters came the people read, ‘King Arthur is dead,’ and they believedthenewswastrue AndthereweresomewhoweptbecausethenobleKingwasslain,butsomehad no time to weep ‘We must find a new King,’ they said And because his laws wereeasy,thesechoseSirModredtoruleoverthem The wicked knight was pleased that the people wished him to be their King ‘TheyshalltakemetoCanterburytocrownme,’hesaidproudly Andthenobles tookhimthere,andamidshoutsandrejoicingshewascrowned Butitwasnotverylongtillotherletterscamefromacrossthesea,sayingthat King Arthur had not been slain, and that he was coming back to rule over his owncountryoncemore WhenSirModredheardthatKingArthurwasonhiswayhome,hecollecteda greatarmyandwenttoDovertotrytokeeptheKingfromlanding But no army would have been strong enough to keep Arthur and his knights awayfromthecountrytheylovedsowell Theyfoughtfiercelytilltheygoton shoreandscatteredallSirModred’smen Thentheknightgatheredtogetheranotherarmy,andchoseanewbattle-field But King Arthur fought so bravely that he and his men were again victorious, andSirModredfledtoCanterbury Many of the people began to forsake the false knight now, and saying that he wasatraitor,theywentbacktoKingArthur But still Sir Modred wished to conquer the King He would go through the countiesofKentandSurreyandraiseanewarmy NowKingArthurhaddreamedthatifhefoughtwithSirModredagainhewould beslain Sowhenheheardthattheknighthadraisedanotherarmy,hethought,‘I willmeetthistraitorwhohasbetrayedme Whenhelooksinmyface,hewillbe ashamedandrememberhisvowofobedience.’ AndhesenttwobishopstoSirModred ‘SaytotheknightthattheKingwould speakwithhimalone,’saidArthur Andthetraitorthought,‘TheKingwishestogivemegoldorgreatpower,ifI sendmyarmyawaywithoutfighting.’‘IwillmeetKingArthur,’hesaidtothe bishops ButbecausehedidnotaltogethertrusttheKinghesaidhewouldtakefourteen menwithhimtothemeeting-place,‘andtheKingmusthavefourteenmenwith himtoo,’saidSirModred ‘Andourarmiesshallkeepwatchwhenwemeet,and ifaswordislifteditshallbethesignalforbattle.’ Then King Arthur arranged a feast for Sir Modred and his men And as they feastedallwentmerrilytillanadderglidedoutofalittlebushandstungoneof the knight’s men And the pain was so great, that the man quickly drew his swordtokilltheadder Andwhenthearmiessawtheswordflashinthelight,theysprangtotheirfeet andbegantofight,‘forthisisthesignalforbattle,’theythought Andwheneveningcamethereweremanythousandslainandwounded,andSir Modredwasleftalone ButArthurhadstilltwoknightswithhim,SirLucanand SirBedivere WhenKingArthursawthathisarmywaslostandallhisknightsslainbuttwo, hesaid,‘WouldtoGodIcouldfindSirModred,whohascausedallthistrouble.’ ‘Heisyonder,’saidSirLucan,‘butrememberyourdream,andgonotnearhim.’ ‘WhetherIdieorlive,’saidtheKing,‘heshallnotescape.’Andseizinghisspear herantoSirModred,crying,‘Nowyoushalldie.’ AndArthursmotehimundertheshield,andthespearpassedthroughhisbody, andhedied Then,woundedandexhausted,theKingfainted,andhisknightsliftedhimand tookhimtoalittlechapelnotfarfromalake As the King lay there, he heard cries of fear and pain from the distant battlefield ‘Whatcausesthesecries?’saidtheKingwearily AndtosoothethesickKing, SirLucansaidhewouldgotosee Andwhenhereachedthebattle-field,hesawinthemoonlightthatrobberswere onthefieldstoopingovertheslain,andtakingfromthemtheirringsandtheir gold Andthosethatwereonlywounded,therobbersslew,thattheymighttake theirjewelstoo SirLucanhastenedback,andtoldtheKingwhathehadseen ‘We will carry you farther off, lest the robbers find us here,’ said the knights And Sir Lucan lifted the King on one side and Sir Bedivere lifted him on the other ButSirLucanhadbeenwoundedinthebattle,andasheliftedtheKinghefell backanddied ThenArthurandSirBedivereweptforthefallenknight NowtheKingfeltsoillthathethoughthewouldnotlivemuchlonger,andhe turnedtoSirBedivere:‘TakeExcalibur,mygoodsword,’hesaid,‘andgowithit tothelake,andthrowitintoitswaters Thencomequicklyandtellmewhatyou see.’ SirBediveretooktheswordandwentdowntothelake Butashelookedatthe handle with its sparkling gems and the richness of the sword, he thought he couldnotthrowitaway ‘Iwillhideitcarefullyhereamongtherushes,’thought theknight Andwhenhehadhiddenit,hewentslowlytotheKingandtoldhim hehadthrowntheswordintothelake ‘Whatdidyousee?’askedtheKingeagerly ‘Nothing but the ripple of the waves as they broke on the beach,’ said Sir Bedivere ‘Youhavenottoldmethetruth,’saidtheKing ‘Ifyouloveme,goagaintothe lake,andthrowmyswordintothewater.’ Againtheknightwenttothewater’sedge Hedrewtheswordfromitshidingplace HewoulddotheKing’swill,forhelovedhim Butagainthebeautyofthe sword made him pause ‘It is a noble sword; I will not throw it away,’ he murmured,asoncemorehe hiditamongtherushes Thenhewent back more slowly,andtoldtheKingthathehaddonehiswill ‘Whatdidyousee?’askedtheKing ‘Nothingbuttheripplesofthewavesastheybrokeonthebeach,’repeatedthe knight ‘You have betrayed me twice,’ said the King sadly, ‘and yet you are a noble knight!Goagaintothelake,anddonotbetraymeforarichsword.’ ThenforthethirdtimeSirBediverewenttothewater’sedge,anddrawingthe swordfromamongtherushes,heflungitasfarashecouldintothelake Andastheknightwatched,anarmandahandappearedabovethesurfaceofthe lake He saw the hand seize the sword, and shaking it three times, disappear againunderthewater ThenSirBediverewentbackquicklytotheKing,andtold himwhathehadseen ‘Carrymetothelake,’entreatedArthur,‘forIhavebeenheretoolong.’ Page115 Page115 AndtheknightcarriedtheKingonhisshouldersdowntothewater’sside There they found a barge lying, and seated in it were three Queens, and each Queen woreablackhood AndwhentheysawKingArthurtheywept ‘Laymeinthebarge,’saidtheKing AndwhenSirBediverehadlaidhimthere, King Arthur rested his head on the lap of the fairest Queen And they rowed fromland SirBedivere,leftalone,watchedthebargeasitdriftedoutofsight,andthenhe wentsorrowfullyonhisway,tillhereachedahermitage Andhelivedthereasa hermitfortherestofhislife AndthebargewasrowedtoavalewheretheKingwashealedofhiswound And some say that now he is dead, but others say that King Arthur will come again,andclearthecountryofitsfoes Edinburgh:PrintedbyT andA CONSTABLE TRANSCRIBER’SNOTES Minor punctuationcorrectionshavebeenmade;however,allspellingsappear asintheoriginal RemovedaduplicatetitlepageforGERAINTANDENID EndofProjectGutenberg'sStoriesofKingArthur'sKnights,byMaryMacGregor ***ENDOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKSTORIESOFKINGARTHUR'SKNIGHTS*** *****Thisfileshouldbenamed25654-h.htmor25654-h.zip***** Thisandallassociatedfilesofvariousformatswillbefoundin: http://www.gutenberg.org/2/5/6/5/25654/ ProducedbyChrisCurnow,LindyWalsh,SuzanFlanaganand theOnlineDistributedProofreadingTeamat http://www.pgdp.net Updatededitionswillreplacethepreviousone theoldeditions willberenamed 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Language:English ***START OF THISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOK STORIES OF KING ARTHUR'S KNIGHTS *** ProducedbyChrisCurnow,LindyWalsh,SuzanFlanaganand theOnlineDistributedProofreadingTeamat http://www.pgdp.net... TOLDTOTHECHILDRENSERIES EDITEDBYLOUEYCHISHOLM KING ARTHUR’S KNIGHTS TO MARIEWINIFRED BESIDEHERSTOODHERBEAUTIFULDAUGHTER Page7 STORIES OF King Arthur’s Knights TOLDTOTHECHILDRENBY MARYMACGREGOR... ‘GeraintandEnid.’Butit,too,isone of theoldWelshtalesthattell of thebrave knights andfairladies of King Arthur’scourt Many times,since SirThomasMalorywrotehisbook,havethese stories been toldagaintooldandyoung,butperhapsneverbeforehavetheybeentoldtothe
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