Lecture Advertising and promotion: An integrated marketing communications perspective (10/e): Chapter 16 - George E. Belch, Michael A. Belch

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Chapter 16 - Sales promotion. The main goals of this chapter are: To understand the role of sales promotion in a company''s integrated marketing communications program and to examine why it is increasingly important, to examine the various objectives of sales promotion programs, to examine the types of consumer and trade-oriented sales promotion tools and the factors to consider in using them. Chapter 16 Sales  Promotion Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education Sales Promotion “A direct inducement that offers an extra value or  “A direct inducement that offers an extra value or  incentive for the product to the sales force,  incentive for the product to the sales force,  distributors, or the ultimate consumer with the  distributors, or the ultimate consumer with the  primary objective of creating an immediate sale.” primary objective of creating an immediate sale.” An extra  An extra  incentive to buy incentive to buy A tool to  A tool to  speed up sales speed up sales Targeted to  Targeted to  different parties different parties Types of Sales Promotion Activities Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education Reasons for the Increase in Sales  Promotion Growing power of retailers and declining brand loyalty Increased promotional sensitivity Brand proliferation Fragmentation of the consumer market Short-term focus and increased accountability Competition and clutter Growth of digital marketing Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education Consumer Franchise­Building versus  Nonfranchise­Building Promotions Consumer franchise-building Nonfranchise-building (non-FB) (CFB) promotions promotions • Communicate distinctive brand • Accelerate the purchase decision attributes and contribute to the process and generate an immediate development and reinforcement of increase in sales brand identity • Build long-term brand preference • Help achieve full-price purchases that are not dependent on promotional • Do not contribute to the building of brand identity and image • Merely borrow customers from other brands offers • Capable of converting consumers to loyal customers Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education Sampling Sampling Works Best When Products are of  relatively low unit  value, so samples  don’t cost much Products are divisible  and can be broken  into small sizes that  reflect the products  features and benefits Purchase cycle is  relatively short so  the consumer can  soon purchase  again Sampling Methods Door-to-door sampling Sampling through the mail In-store sampling On-package sampling Event sampling Sampling through magazines and newspapers Sample request forms Sampling through the internet and social media Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education Advantages and Limitations of  Couponing Advantages • Appeals to price-sensitive customers • Does not require retailers’ cooperation • Reduces consumer’s perceived risk associated with trial of a new brand • Encourages repeat purchase • Helps coax users to trade up to more expensive brands Limitations • Estimating how many consumers will use a coupon and when is difficult • Less effective for inducing initial product trial in a short period • Consumers already using the brand cannot be prevented from using the coupons • Have low redemption rates and high costs • Could result in misredemptions Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education Types of Premium  Free premiums: Small gifts or merchandise:  Included in the product package  Sent to consumers who mail in a request along with  a proof of purchase  Self­liquidating premiums: Require the consumer  to pay:  Some or all of the cost of the premium  Handling and mailing costs Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education Contests and Sweepstakes Sweepstakes Promotion where winners are determined purely by chance Cannot require proof of purchase as a condition for entry Winners chosen by random selection from pool  of entries or generation of a number to match  those held by game entrants Consumers compete for prizes or money on the  basis of skills or ability Contest Winners determined by judging entries or ascertaining which entry is closest to predetermined criteria Advantages & Limitations of Refunds  and Rebates Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education 11 Advantages and Limitations of Bonus  Packs  Advantages • Direct way to provide extra value • Have a strong impact on the purchase decision at the time of purchase • Effective defensive maneuver against competitor’s promotion • May result in larger purchase orders and favorable display space in stores Limitations • Require additional shelf space without providing extra profit margins for retailers • Appeal primarily only to current users and promotion-sensitive consumers Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education 12 Advantages and Limitations of Price­off  Deals Advantages • Ensure discounts reach the consumers • Present a readily apparent value to shoppers • Encourage consumers to purchase larger quantities Limitations • Can create pricing and inventory problems • Appeal primarily to regular users and not new users • Must adhere to regulations set by the Federal Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent Trade Commission of McGraw-Hill Education 13 Event Marketing versus Event  sponsorship Event marketing • Company or brand is linked to Event sponsorship • Company develops an event, or a themed activity sponsorship relations with an is developed to: event and provides financial • Create experiences for support in return for: consumers • Promote a product or service • Right to display a brand name, logo, or advertising message • Being identified as a supporter of the event Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education 14 Figure 16.5 ­ Consumer­Oriented Sales Promotion  Tools for Various Marketing Objectives Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education 15 Types of Trade Oriented Promotions Contests and incentives Types Co­op Advertising Trade allowances POP displays Buying Sales training Promotional Trade shows Slotting Types of Cooperative Advertising Horizontal cooperative advertising • Sponsored by a group of retailers providing products or services to the market Ingredient-sponsored cooperative advertising • Supported by raw materials manufacturers • Establishes end products that include the company’s materials and/or ingredients Vertical cooperative advertising • Manufacturer pays for a portion of the advertising a retailer runs to promote the manufacturer’s product Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education 17 Figure 16.8 ­ The Sales Promotion Trap Copyright © 2014 McGraw-Hill Education All rights reserved No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education 18 ... attributes and contribute to the process and generate an immediate development and reinforcement of increase in sales brand identity • Build long-term brand preference • Help achieve full-price purchases... retailers and declining brand loyalty Increased promotional sensitivity Brand proliferation Fragmentation of the consumer market Short-term focus and increased accountability Competition and clutter... Consumer Franchise­Building versus  Nonfranchise­Building Promotions Consumer franchise-building Nonfranchise-building (non-FB) (CFB) promotions promotions • Communicate distinctive brand • Accelerate the purchase
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Xem thêm: Lecture Advertising and promotion: An integrated marketing communications perspective (10/e): Chapter 16 - George E. Belch, Michael A. Belch, Lecture Advertising and promotion: An integrated marketing communications perspective (10/e): Chapter 16 - George E. Belch, Michael A. Belch, Figure 16.5 - Consumer-Oriented Sales Promotion Tools for Various Marketing Objectives

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