Cambridge.University.Press.An.Introduction.to.the.Philosophy.of.Mind.Jan.2000.pdf

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Cambridge.University.Press.An.Introduction.to.the.Philosophy.of.Mind.Jan.2000. In this book Jonathan Lowe offers a lucid and wide-ranging introduction to the philosophy of mind. Using aproblem-centred approach designed to stimulate as wellas instruct, he begins with a general examination of themind–body problem and moves on to detailed examina-tion of more specific philosophical issues concerningsensation, perception, thought and language, rational-ity, artificial intelligence, action, personal identity andself-knowledge. His discussion is notably broad in scope,and distinctive in giving equal attention to deep meta-physical questions concerning the mind and to the dis-coveries and theories of modern scientific psychology. Itwill be of interest to any reader with a basic groundingin modern philosophy.E. J. Lowe is Professor of Philosophy at the University ofDurham. His publications include Kinds of Being (1989),Locke on Human Understanding (1995), Subjects of Experience(1996) and The Possibility of Metaphysics (1998).AN INTRODUCTION TO THEPHILOSOPHY OF MINDAN INTRODUCTIONTO THE PHILOSOPHYOF MINDE. J. LOWEUniversity of Durham         The Pitt Building, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, United Kingdom  The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 2RU, UK40 West 20th Street, New York, NY 10011-4211, USA477 Williamstown Road, Port Melbourne, VIC 3207, AustraliaRuiz de Alarcón 13, 28014 Madrid, SpainDock House, The Waterfront, Cape Town 8001, South Africahttp://www.cambridge.orgFirst published in printed format ISBN 0-521-65285-5 hardbackISBN 0-521-65428-9 paperbackISBN 0-511-04054-7 eBookE. J. Lowe 20042000(netLibrary)©ContentsPrefacepagexi1Introduction1Empiricalpsychologyandphilosophicalanalysis2Metaphysicsandthephilosophyofmind3Abriefguidetotherestofthisbook62Minds,bodiesandpeople8Cartesiandualism9Theconceivabilityargument11Thedivisibilityargument13Non-Cartesiandualism15Arepersonssimplesubstances?18Conceptualobjectionstodualisticinteraction21Empiricalobjectionstodualisticinteraction24Thecausalclosureargument26Objectionstothecausalclosureargument29Otherargumentsforandagainstphysicalism32Conclusions363Mentalstates39Propositionalattitudestates40Behaviourismanditsproblems41Functionalism44Functionalismandpsychophysicalidentitytheories48Theproblemofconsciousness51Qualiaandtheinvertedspectrumargument53Somepossibleresponsestotheinvertedspectrumargument55Theabsentqualiaargumentandtwonotionsofconsciousness59Eliminativematerialismand‘folkpsychology’61Someresponsestoeliminativematerialism64Conclusions66viiContentsviii4Mentalcontent69Propositions70Thecausalrelevanceofcontent74Theindividuationofcontent79Externalisminthephilosophyofmind82Broadversusnarrowcontent84Content,representationandcausality89Misrepresentationandnormality92Theteleologicalapproachtorepresentation95Objectionstoateleologicalaccountofmentalcontent99Conclusions1005Sensationandappearance102Appearanceandreality103Sense-datumtheoriesandtheargumentfromillusion107Otherargumentsforsense-data110Objectionstosense-datumtheories112Theadverbialtheoryofsensation114Theadverbialtheoryandsense-data116Primaryandsecondaryqualities119Sense-datumtheoriesandtheprimary/secondarydistinction121Anadverbialversionoftheprimary/secondarydistinction125Docolour-propertiesreallyexist?126Conclusions1286Perception130Perceptualexperienceandperceptualcontent131Perceptualcontent,appearanceandqualia135Perceptionandcausation137Objectionstocausaltheoriesofperception143Thedisjunctivetheoryofperception145Thecomputationalandecologicalapproachestoperception149Consciousness,experienceand‘blindsight’155Conclusions1587Thoughtandlanguage160Modesofmentalrepresentation162The‘languageofthought’hypothesis164Analogueversusdigitalrepresentation167Imaginationandmentalimagery169Thoughtandcommunication175Doanimalsthink?178Naturallanguageandconceptualschemes183Contents ixKnowledgeoflanguage:innateoracquired?188Conclusions1918Humanrationalityandartificialintelligence193Rationalityandreasoning194TheWasonselectiontask196Thebaseratefallacy200Mentallogicversusmentalmodels203Twokindsofrationality208ArtificialintelligenceandtheTuringtest209Searle’s‘Chineseroom’thought-experiment214TheFrameProblem218Connectionismandthemind221Conclusions2279Action,intentionandwill230Agents,actionsandevents231Intentionality235Theindividuationofactions240Intentionalityagain243Tryingandwilling246Volitionismversusitsrivals250Freedomofthewill252Motives,reasonsandcauses257Conclusions26210Personalidentityandself-knowledge264Thefirstperson266Personsandcriteriaofidentity270Personalmemory277Memoryandcausation282Animalism283Knowingone’sownmind288Moore’sparadoxandthenatureofconsciousbelief291Externalismandself-knowledge293Self-deception296Conclusions297Bibliography298Index313 . Experience(1996) and The Possibility of Metaphysics (1998). AN INTRODUCTION TO THEPHILOSOPHY OF MIND AN INTRODUCTIONTO THE PHILOSOPHYOF MINDE. J. LOWEUniversity of. includenon-human animals and perhaps even robots, if these too can1 An introduction to the philosophy of mind2 be minded. More speculatively, the things in
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