The three clerks

542 4 0
  • Loading ...
1/542 trang
Tải xuống

Thông tin tài liệu

Ngày đăng: 15/03/2020, 12:24

TheProjectGutenbergeBook,TheThreeClerks,byAnthonyTrollope, etal ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwithalmost norestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayorre-use itunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincludedwiththis eBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:TheThreeClerks Author:AnthonyTrollope ReleaseDate:May8,2003[eBook#7481] LastUpdated:October13,2018 Language:English ***STARTOFTHEPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHETHREECLERKS*** E-textpreparedbyCharlesFranks,DelphineLettau,MarkSherwood,and thepeopleatDistributedProofreading HTMLfileproducedbyDavidWidger THETHREECLERKS ByAnthonyTrollope WithanIntroductionbyW TeignmouthShore CONTENTS ANTHONYTROLLOPE INTRODUCTION CHAPTERI —THEWEIGHTSANDMEASURES CHAPTERII —THEINTERNALNAVIGATION CHAPTERIII —THEWOODWARDS CHAPTERIV —CAPTAINCUTTWATER CHAPTERV —BUSHEYPARK CHAPTERVI —SIRGREGORYHARDLINES CHAPTERVII —MR FIDUSNEVERBEND CHAPTERVIII —THEHON UNDECIMUSSCOTT CHAPTERIX —MR MANYLODES CHAPTERX —WHEALMARYJANE CHAPTERXI —THETHREEKINGS CHAPTERXII —CONSOLATION CHAPTERXIII —ACOMMUNICATIONOFIMPORTANCE CHAPTERXIV —VERYSAD CHAPTERXV —NORMANRETURNSTOTOWN CHAPTERXVI —THEFIRSTWEDDING CHAPTERXVII —THEHONOURABLEMRS VALANDMISS GOLIGHTLY CHAPTER XVIII — A DAY WITH ONE OF THE NAVVIES.— MORNING CHAPTER XIX — A DAY WITH ONE OF THE NAVVIES.— AFTERNOON CHAPTER XX — A DAY WITH ONE OF THE NAVVIES.— EVENING CHAPTERXXI —HAMPTONCOURTBRIDGE CHAPTER XXII — CRINOLINE AND MACASSAR; OR, MY AUNT'SWILL CHAPTERXXIII —SURBITONCOLLOQUIES CHAPTERXXIV —MR M'BUFFERACCEPTSTHECHILTERN HUNDREDS CHAPTERXXV —CHISWICKGARDENS CHAPTERXXVI —KATIE'SFIRSTBALL CHAPTERXXVII —EXCELSIOR CHAPTERXXVIII —OUTERMANvTUDOR CHAPTERXXIX —EASYISTHESLOPEOFHELL CHAPTERXXX —MRS WOODWARD'SREQUEST CHAPTERXXXI —HOWAPOLLOSAVEDTHENAVVY CHAPTERXXXII —THEPARLIAMENTARYCOMMITTEE CHAPTERXXXIII —TOSTAND,ORNOTTOSTAND CHAPTERXXXIV —WESTMINSTERHALL CHAPTERXXXV —MRS VAL'SNEWCARRIAGE CHAPTERXXXVI —TICKLISHSTOCK CHAPTERXXXVII —TRIBULATION CHAPTERXXXVIII —ALARICTUDORTAKESAWALK CHAPTERXXXIX —THELASTBREAKFAST CHAPTERXL —MR CHAFFANBRASS CHAPTERXLI —THEOLDBAILEY CHAPTERXLII —APARTINGINTERVIEW CHAPTERXLIII —MILLBANK CHAPTER XLIV — THE CRIMINAL POPULATION IS DISPOSEDOF CHAPTERXLV —THEFATEOFTHENAVVIES CHAPTERXLVI —MR NOGO'SLASTQUESTION CHAPTERXLVII —CONCLUSION ANTHONYTROLLOPE BornLondon,April24,1815 DiedLondon,December6,1882 INTRODUCTION Thereisthepropermoodandthejustenvironmentforthereadingaswellas for the writing of works of fiction, and there can be no better place for the enjoying of a novel by Anthony Trollope than under a tree in Kensington Gardensofasummerday Underatreeintheavenuethatreachesdownfromthe RoundPondtotheLongWater There,perhapsmorethananywhereelse,lingers theearlyVictorianatmosphere Aswesitbeneathourtree,weseeinthedistance thedun,red-brickwallsofKensingtonPalace,whereonenightPrincessVictoria was awakened to hear that she was Queen; there in quaint, hideously ugly Victorian rooms are to be seen Victorian dolls and other playthings; the whole environmentisearlyVictorian Heretothemind'seyehoweasyitistoconjure upghostsofmeninbaggytrousersandlongflowingwhiskers,ofprimwomen in crinolines, in hats with long trailing feathers and with ridiculous little parasols, or with Grecian-bends and chignons—church-parading to and fro beneaththetreesorbythewater'sedge—perchance,eventhefascinatingLady CrinolineandtheelegantMr MacassarJones,whosehistoryhasbeenwrittenby Clerk Charley in the pages we are introducing to the 'gentle reader' As a poetasterofanearlierdatehaswritten:— WhereKensingtonhigho'ertheneighbouringlands 'Midstgreenandsweets,aroyalfabric,stands, Andseeseachspring,luxuriantinherbowers, Asnowofblossoms,andawildofflowers, ThedamesofBritainoftincrowdsrepair Togravelwalks,andunpollutedair Here,whilethetownindampsanddarknesslies, Theybreatheinsunshine,andseeazureskies; Eachwalk,withrobesofvariousdyesbespread, Seemsfromafaramovingtulipbed, Whererichbrocadesandglossydamasksglow, Andchintz,therivaloftheshowerybow Indeed, the historian of social manners, when dealing with the Victorian period, will perforce have recourse to the early volumes of Punch and to the novelsofThackeray,Dickens,andTrollope There are certain authors of whom personally we know little, but of whose works we cannot ever know enough, such a one for example as Shakespeare; others of whose lives we know much, but for whose works we can have but scant affection: such is Doctor Johnson; others who are intimate friends in all theiraspects,asGoldsmithandCharlesLamb;yetothers,whodonotquitecome hometoourbosoms,whosewritingswecannotentirelyapprove,butforwhom andforwhoseworkswefindasoftplacesomewhereinourhearts,andsucha one is Anthony Trollope His novels are not for every-day reading, any more thanarethoseofMarryatandBorrow—totaketwocuriousexamples Thereare timesandmoodsandplacesinwhichitwouldbequiteimpossibletoreadThe ThreeClerks;othersinwhichthisstoryisalmostwhollydelightful Withthose who are fond of bed-reading Trollope should ever be a favourite, and it is no smallcomplimenttosaythis,forsmallisthenoblearmyofauthorswhohave given us books which can enchant in the witching hour between waking and slumber It is probable that all lovers of letters have their favourite bed-books Thackeray has charmingly told us of his Of the few novels that can really be enjoyed when the reader is settling down for slumber almost all have been set forth by writers who—consciously or unconsciously—have placed character beforeplot;Thackerayhimself,MissAusten,Borrow,Marryat,Sterne,Dickens, Goldsmithand—Trollope Booksareveryhumanintheirway,aswhatelseshouldtheybe,childrenof menandwomenastheyare?Justaswithhumanfriendssowithbookfriends, first impressions are often misleading; good literary coin sometimes seems to ring untrue, but the untruth is in the ear of the reader, not of the writer For instance,Trollopehasmanyoddandirritatingtrickswhichareapttoscareoff those who lack perseverance and who fail to understand that there must be somethingadmirableinthatwhichwasoncemuchadmiredbythejudicious He shareswithThackeraythesinfulhabitofpullinguphisreaderswithawrenchby remindingthemthatwhatissetbeforethemisafterallmerefictionandthatthe characters in whose fates they are becoming interested are only marionettes With Dickens and others he shares the custom, so irritating to us of to-day, of ticketing his personages with clumsy, descriptive labels, such as, in The Three Clerks, Mr Chaffanbrass, Sir Gregory Hardlines, Sir Warwick West End, Mr Neverbend, Mr Whip Vigil, Mr Nogo and Mr Gitemthruet He must plead guilty,also,tosomebadwayspeculiarlyhisown,orwhichhemadesobythe thoroughnesswithwhichheindulgedinthem Hemoralizesinhisownpersonin deplorable manner: is not this terrible:—'Poor Katie!—dear, darling, bonnie Katie!—sweet,sweetest,dearestchild! why, oh,why, hasthat mother ofthine, thattender-heartedlovingmother,puttheeunguardedinthewayofsuchperils asthis?Hasshenotsworntoherselfthatovertheeatleastshewouldwatchasa henoverheryoung,sothatnounfortunateloveshouldquenchthyyoungspirit, or blanch thy cheek's bloom?' Is this not sufficient to make the gentlest reader sweartohimself? Fortunatelythisandsomeotherappallingpassagesoccurafterthestoryisin full swing and after the three Clerks and those with whom they come into contacthaveprovedthemselvesthoroughlyinterestingcompanions Despiteall hisold-fashionedtricksTrollopedoesundoubtedlysucceedingivingbloodand life to most of his characters; they are not as a rule people of any great eccentricityorofprofoundemotions;butordinary,every-dayfolk,suchasallof us have met, and loved or endured Trollope fills very adequately a space between Thackeray and Dickens, of whom the former deals for the most part with the upper 'ten', the latter with the lower 'ten'; Trollope with the suburban andcountry-town'ten';thethreetogethergivingusaverycompleteanddetailed pictureofthelivesledbyourgrandmothersandgrandfathers,whoseheartswere inthesameplaceasourown,butwhosemannersofspeech,ofbehaviourandof dresshavenowenteredintothevagueregionknownasthe'daysofyore' The Three Clerks is an excellent example of Trollope's handiwork The development of the plot is sufficiently skilful to maintain the reader's interest, and the major part of the characters is lifelike, always well observed and sometimes depicted with singular skill and insight Trollope himself liked the workwell:— 'TheplotisnotsogoodasthatofTheMacdermots;norareanycharactersin thebookequaltothoseofMrs ProudieandtheWarden;buttheworkhasamore continued interest, and contains the first well-described love-scene that I ever wrote ThepassageinwhichKateWoodward,thinkingshewilldie,triestotake leaveoftheladsheloves,stillbringstearstomyeyeswhenIreadit Ihadnot thehearttokillher Inevercoulddothat AndIdonotdoubtthattheyareliving happilytogethertothisday 'ThelawyerChaffanbrassmadehisfirstappearanceinthisnovel,andIdonot think that I have cause to be ashamed of him But this novel now is chiefly noticeabletomefromthefactthatinitIintroducedacharacterunderthename ofSirGregoryHardlines,bywhichIintendedtoleanveryheavilyonthatmuch loathed scheme of competitive examination, of which at that time Sir Charles Trevelyan was the great apostle Sir Gregory Hardlines was intended for Sir Charles Trevelyan—as any one at the time would know who had taken an interestintheCivilService 'WealwayscallhimSirGregory,'LadyTrevelyan saidtomeafterwardswhenIcametoknowherhusband Ineverlearnedtolove competitive examination; but I became, and am, very fond of Sir Charles Trevelyan SirStaffordNorthcote,whoisnowChancelloroftheExchequer,was thenleaguedwithhisfriendSirCharles,andhetooappearsinTheThreeClerks ... and Dickens, of whom the former deals for the most part with the upper 'ten', the latter with the lower 'ten'; Trollope with the suburban andcountry-town'ten'; the three togethergivingusaverycompleteanddetailed... SirStaffordNorthcote,whoisnowChancellorof the Exchequer,was thenleaguedwithhisfriendSirCharles,andhetooappearsin The Three Clerks under the feeblyfacetiousnameofSirWarwickWestEnd Butforallthat The Three Clerks wasagoodnovel.'... Cellars;theydiveatmidnighthoursintoShades,andknowall the backparlours of all the public-houses in the neighbourhood of the Strand Here they leave messagesforoneanother,andcall the girlat the barbyherChristianname They areasetofmenendowedwithsallowcomplexions,andtheywearloudclothing,
- Xem thêm -

Xem thêm: The three clerks , The three clerks

Mục lục

Xem thêm

Gợi ý tài liệu liên quan cho bạn