The red mans revenge

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TheProjectGutenbergEBookofTheRedMan'sRevenge,byR.M Ballantyne ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:TheRedMan'sRevenge ATaleofTheRedRiverFlood Author:R.M Ballantyne ReleaseDate:June6,2007[EBook#21697] Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHEREDMAN'SREVENGE*** ProducedbyNickHodsonofLondon,England R.M Ballantyne "TheRedMan'sRevenge" ChapterOne ATaleoftheRedRiverFlood OpenstheBall Ifevertherewasamanwhopossessedagemintheformofadaughter ofnineteen,thatmanwasSamuelRavenshaw;andifevertherewasa girlwhoownedabluff,jovial,fiery,hot-tempered,irascibleoldfather,that girlwasElsieRavenshaw Although a gem, Elsie was exceedingly imperfect Had she been the reverseshewouldnothavebeenworthwritingabout OldRavenshaw,ashisfamiliarsstyledhim,wasasettler,ifwemayuse such a term in reference to one who was, perhaps, among the most unsettledofmen HehadsettledwithhisfamilyonthebanksoftheRed River The colony on that river is now one of the frontier towns of Canada At the time we write of, it was a mere oasis in the desert, not evenanoffshootofcivilisation,foritoweditsexistencechieflytothefact that retiring servants of the Hudson’s Bay Fur Company congregated theretospendtheeveningoflife,farbeyondtheCanadianboundary,in the heart of that great wilderness where they had spent their working days,andonthebordersofthatgrandprairiewheretheredmanandthe buffalo roamed at will, and the conventionalities of civilised life troubled themnot TothishavenofrestSamuelRavenshawhadretired,afterspendingan activelifeintheserviceofthefur-traders,somewhatstiffenedinthejoints by age and a rough career, and a good deal soured in disposition becauseofpromotionhaving,ashethought,beentoolongdeferred Besides Elsie, old Ravenshaw possessed some other gems of inferior lustre His wife Maggie, a stout, well-favoured lady, with an insufficient intellect and unbounded good humour, was of considerable intrinsic value,buthighlyunpolished Hisseconddaughter,Cora,wasathinslip ofsixteenyears,likehermotherinsomerespects—pretty,attractive,and disposed to take life easily His eldest son, Victor, a well-grown lad of fourteen,wasaroughdiamond,ifadiamondatall,withasoulcentredon sport His second son, Anthony, between five and six, was large and robust,likehisfather Nothavingbeenpolishedatthattime,itishardto say what sort of gem Tony was When engaged in mischief—his besetting foible—his eyes shone like carbuncles with unholy light He wastheplagueofthefamily Ofcourse,therefore,hewasthebelovedof hisparents SuchwerethechiefinmatesofWillowCreek,asoldRavenshawstyled hishouseandproperty Itwasmidwinter TheownerofWillowCreekstoodathisparlourwindow, smoking and gazing There was not much to look at, for snow had overwhelmedandburiedthelandscape,fringedeverytwigofthewillows, andobliteratedthefrozenriver Elsiewasseatedbythestove,embroideringapairofmoccasins “Victor is bringing down some of the lads to shoot to-day, father,” she said,castingafurtiveglanceathersire “Humph!thatboydoesnothingbutshoot,”growledtheoldman,whowas agiantinbodyifnotinspirit “Whoallishebringing?” “There’s John Flett, and David Mowat, and Sam Hayes, and Herr Winklemann,andIanMacdonald,andLouisLambert—allthebestshots, Isuppose,”saidElsie,bendingoverherwork “The best shots!” cried Mr Ravenshaw, turning from the window with a sarcastic laugh “Louis Lambert, indeed, and Winklemann are crack shots, and John Flett is not bad, but the others are poor hands Mowat canonlyshootstraightwithacrookedgun,andasforthathalf-cracked schoolmaster,JanMacdonald,hewouldmissabarndooratfiftypaces unless he were to shut his eyes and fire at random, in which case he’d havesomechance—” “Here they is; the shooters is comin’ Hooray!” shouted Master Anthony Ravenshaw,asheburstintotheroomwithascalping-knifeinonehand andawoodengunintheother “An’I’sgoin’toshoottoo,daddy!” “Soyouare,Tony,myboy!”criedtheoldtrader,catchinguptheprideof his heart in his strong arms and tossing him towards the ceiling “You shallshootbeforelongwitharealgun.” Tonyknockedthepipeoutofhisfather’smouth,andwasproceedingto operate on his half-bald head with the scalping-knife, when Cora, who entered the room at the moment, sprang forward and wrenched the weaponfromhisgrasp “We’ll give them dinner after the shooting is over, shan’t we, father?” askedCora “Of course, my dear, of course,” replied the hospitable old gentleman, giving the pride of his heart a sounding kiss as he put him down “Set yourmothertoworkonapie,andgetMissTrimtohelpyouwithalotof thosecakesyoumakesofamously.” Ashespoketherewasasuddenclatteringintheporch Theyoungmen were taking off their snow-shoes and stamping the snow from off their leggingsandmoccasinedfeet “Here we are, father!” cried a bright, sturdy youth, as he ushered in his followers “Of course Elsie has prepared you for our sudden invasion Thefactisthatwegotupthematchonthespurofthemoment,because IfoundthatIanhadaholiday.” “No explanation required, Victor Glad to see you all, boys Sit down,” saidMrRavenshaw,shakinghandsallround The youths who were thus heartily welcomed presented a fine manly appearance They were clad in the capotes, leggings, fur caps, moccasins, and fingerless mittens usually worn by the men of the settlementinwinter That tall handsome fellow, with the curly black hair and flashing eyes, who bears himself so confidently as he greets the sisters, is Louis Lambert Thethicksetyouthbehindhim,withtheshockofflaxenhairand imperceptible moustache, is Herr Winklemann, a German farmer’s son, andafamedbuffalo-hunter Theungainlyman,oftwenty-fourapparently —orthereabouts—withtheplainbutkindlyface,andtheframenearlyas strongasthatofthehosthimself,isIanMacdonald Inappearanceheis aruggedbackwoodsman Inrealityheistheschoolmasterofthatpartof thewidely-scatteredcolony The invitation to sit down was not accepted Daylight was short-lived in thoseregionsatthatseasonoftheyear Theysalliedforthtotheworkin hand “You’vehadthetargetputup,Cora?”askedVictor,ashewentout “Yes,intheoldplace.” “WhereisTony?” “Idon’tknow,”saidCora,lookinground “Hewasherejustnow,tryingto scalpfather.” “You’ll find him at the target before you, no doubt,” said Elsie, putting awayhermoccasinsassherosetoaidinthehouseholdpreparations The target was placed against the bank of the river, so that the bullets mightfindasaferetreat Thecompetitorsstoodataboutahundredyards’ distance in front of it The weapons used were single-barrelled smoothbores, with flint locks Percussion locks had not at that time come into fashion,andlongrangeshadnotyetbeendreamedof “Come,opentheball,Lambert,”saidVictor The handsome youth at once stepped forward, and old Mr Ravenshaw watched him with an approving smile as he took aim Puff! went the powderinthepan,butnosoundfollowedsavethepealoflaughterwith which the miss-fire was greeted The touch-hole was pricked, and next timetheballspedtoitsmark Ithitthetargettwoinchesabovethebull’seye The “well done” with which the shot was hailed was cut short by an appallingyell,andlittleTonywasseentotumblefrombehindthetarget Rollingheadoverheels,hecurledhimselfroundinagony,sprangupwith aspasmodicbound,droppeduponhishaunches,turnedoveracomplete somersault,fellonhisbackwithafearfulshriek,andlaydeaduponthe snow! Thewholepartyrushedinconsternationtowardstheboy,butbeforethey had reached him he leaped up and burst into a fit of gleeful laughter, which ended in a cheer and a savage war-whoop as he scampered up thetrackwhichledtothehouse,anddisappearedoverthebrowofthe river’sbank “The imp was joking!” exclaimed Mr Ravenshaw, as he stopped and wipedthecoldperspirationfromhisbrow AtthatmomentaRedIndianappearedonthescene,inhisblanketrobe, paint,andfeathers Attractedbytheshot,hehadcometolookon Now, the old fur-trader’s nerves had received a tremendous shock, and the practicaljestwhichtheprideofhishearthadperpetratedhadrousedthe irascibility of his nature, so that an explosion became unavoidable In thesecircumstancesthearrivaloftheIndianseemedopportune,forthe old gentleman knew that this particular savage was a chief, and had visitedthecolonyforthepurposeofmakinginquiriesintothenewreligion reported to be taught by certain white men in black garments; and Mr Ravenshaw,besideshavingverylittleregardformissionaries,hadavery strong contempt for those Indians who became their disciples He thereforerelievedhimselfontheredman “What you want here, Petawanaquat?” he demanded sternly, in the languageoftheIndian “TheLittleWolf,”repliedtheIndian,referringtohimself,forsuchwasthe interpretationofhisname,“wishestoseehowhiswhitebrothersshoot.” “LettheLittleWolfputhistailbetweenhislegsandbegone,”criedthe angryoldman “Heisnotwantedhere Come,beoff!” Thechieflookedstraightintheeyesofthetraderwithadarkscowl,then, turningslowlyonhisheel,stalkedsolemnlyaway There was an irrepressible laugh at this episode as the group of marksmen returned to their former position Mr Ravenshaw, however, soonleftthemandreturnedhome HerehefoundMissTriminastateof considerable agitation; she had just encountered the redskin! Miss Trim was a poor relation of Mrs Ravenshaw She had been invited by her brother-in-law to leave England and come to Red River to act as governess to Tony and assistant-companion in the family She had arrivedthatautumnincompanywithapiano,onwhichshewasexpected toexerciseElsieandCora Petawanaquat,beingthefirst“reallywildand paintedsavage”shehadseen,madeadeepimpressiononher “Oh, Mr Ravenshaw, I have seen such an object in the garden!” she exclaimed, in a gushing torrent—she always spoke in a torrent—“and it wasallIcoulddotostaggerintothehousewithoutfainting Sucheyes! with black cheeks and a red nose—at least, it looked red, but I was in such a state that I couldn’t make sure whether it was the nose or the chin, and my shoe came off as I ran away, having broken the tie in the morning Andsuchayellasitgave!—thecreature,nottheshoe-tie—butI escaped,andpeepedoutoftheupperwindow—theoneinthegable,you know, with the green blind, where you can see the garden from end to end,andIfoundithaddisappeared,thoughIcan’tunderstand—” “Tut, tut, Miss Trim; how you gallop! Was it a beast?” asked the old trader “Abeast?No;aman—asavage.” “Oh! I understand; it was that scoundrel Petawanaquat,” said Sam Ravenshaw, with a laugh; “he’s Little Wolf by name, and a big thief by practice,nodoubt Youneedn’tfearhim,however,he’snotsodangerous ashelooks,andIgavehimarebuffjustnowthatwillmakehimshyof WillowCreek.—Ha,Tony,yourascal!Comehere,sir.” Tonycameatonce,withsuchagleefulvisagethathisfather’sintended chastisementfortherecentpracticaljokeendedinaparentalcaress Bitterly did Ian Macdonald repent of his agreeing to join the shooting partythatday Owingtosomedefectinhisvisionornervoussystem,he wasaremarkablybadshot,thoughineverythingelsehewasanexpert and stalwart backwoodsman, as well as a good scholar But when his friend Victor invited him he could not refuse, because it offered him an opportunity of spending some time in the society of Elsie Ravenshaw, andthattohimwasheavenuponearth!Littleofhersociety,however,did the unfortunate teacher enjoy that day, for handsome Louis Lambert engrossed not only Elsie, but the mother and father as well He had beaten all his competitors at the target, but, to him justice, did not boastofthat;neitherdidhemakeanyreferencetothefactthatIanhad twice missed the target, though he did not spare the bad shooting of someoftheotheryouths;this,nodoubt,becauseheandIanhadbeen fast friends for many years Jealousy—at least on the part of Ian—now seemedabouttointerferewiththeoldfriendship Moreover,Lamberthad broughttoMrsRavenshawagiftofacollarmadeoftheclawsofagrizzly bear, shot by himself in the Rocky Mountains Elsie admired the collar withgenuineinterest,andsaidshewouldgiveanythingtopossessone likeit Cora,withthecoquettishnessofsixteen,said,withalaughanda blush,thatshewouldnotacceptsucharidiculousthingifitwereoffered toher IanMacdonaldgroanedinspirit,for,withhisincapacitytoshoot, heknewthatElsie’swishcouldneverbegratifiedbyhim SeeingthatLambertwasbentonkeepingElsieasmuchaspossibleto himself,IandevotedhimselftoCora,butCorawascross Feelingituphillwork,hesoonrosetosaygood-bye,andleftWillowCreekbeforethe others “Don’t look so crestfallen, man,” said old Mr Ravenshaw heartily, as he shookhands;“it’snoblerworktoteachtheyoungideahowtoshootthan tobeabletohitabull’s-eye.” “True,buthewhocannothitabull’s-eye,”returnedIan,withasmile,“can scarcelybeexpectedtotouchamaiden’s—Imeanagrizzly’sheart.” A shout of laughter from Lambert greeted him as he left the house His way home lay over the frozen bed of the river Victor accompanied him partoftheway “Thatwasastrangeslipforanunromanticfellowlikeyoutomakeabout amaiden’sheart,Ian,”saidVictor,lookingupattheruggedcountenance ofhisfriend Riverwasitselfagain,withitsriverconfinedtotheproperchannel,and its prairies rolling with grass-waves; but it was not long before the energeticinhabitantsreturnedtotheirlaboursandtheirdesolatedhouses to begin the world anew About the 1st of May the flood began; by the 20th of the same month it had reached its height, and on the 22nd the waters began to assuage On that day they had made a decided fall of twoinches Theheighttowhichthewatershadrisenabovethelevelof ordinaryyearswasfifteenfeet Thefloodsubsidedverygradually About themiddleofJunetheploughswereatworkagain,andthepeoplebusy sowingwhatwaslefttothemoftheirseed-barleyandpotatoes AmongthebusiestofthebusyatthatbustlingtimewasPeegwish While otherswerehardatworkclearing,rebuilding,ploughing,andsowing,our noblesavagewasfishing Thelabourofthisoccupationconsistedchiefly instaringathisline,whilehesatonamud-heapontheriverbank,and smokedinthepleasantsunshine Occasionallyherousedhimselftohaul out a goldeye Wildcat assisted him ably in his labours, and still more ably in the after consumption of the goldeyes Angus Macdonald discovered them thus occupied, and had difficulty in resisting his desire topitchthelazyfellowintotheriver “What wass you doin’ there?” he cried “Wass it wastin’ your time wi’ smallfushyouwillpedoin’,an’everywanelseworkin’hard?Goan’putt theoxinthecartan’haulwatter Looksharp!” Angus concluded with some deep gutturals in Gaelic which we cannot translate,andPeegwish,risinghastily,wentofftodoashewasbid But Peegwish was a poor water-drawer The ox turned out to be more obstinate than himself, and also more callous, for when it became fatiguedwithhaulingthewater-barreltoandfro,itstoppedatthefootof theslopenearacornerofthegarden,andrefusedtobudge Peegwish lashed it, but it did not feel—at all events, it did not care He tried to wheedleit,butfailed:hebecameabusive,andusedbadlanguagetothe ox, but without success He was in the height of his distress when Petawanaquatpassedbywithaloadoffirewoodonhisshoulder Thered man having been reconciled to his old enemy, had remained at Red River,partlytoassisthim,partlytoseetheendoftheflood,andpartlyto benearhisfriendSinclairandhisadoptedsonTonyquat Fromthelatter hecouldnottearhimselfaway The Indian stood and gazed solemnly at his brother savage for some minutes, then he threw down his load, and entering the garden, cut the remainsofacabbagewhichhadsurvivedtheflood Withthishewentto theoxandheldittoitsnose Theanimaladvanced;theIndianretreated afewsteps Theoxadvancedagaininthehopeofobtainingasavoury mouthful,buttheIndianstillretreated Thus,stepbystep,theslopewas ascended! “Wah!”saidPetawanaquat,withagravelook,ashehandedthecabbage toPeegwish,whoprofitedbythelesson,andgainedhisends “She’sferylazy,”mutteredAngustohimself—referringtoPeegwish—as hewentuptheriverbanktowardstheknoll,wherehishousenowstood triumphantly,“ferylazy;morelazythan—than—” Failing to find a just comparison, he tailed off in expressive but untranslatableGaelic “Goottaytoyou,MusterRuvnshaw,”saidAngus,onreachingthesummit of the knoll “It wass fery goot of you, whatever, to let my hoose stand here.” “Don’tmentionit,Angus,”saidtheoldgentleman,removinghispipewith one hand, and extending the other “It would be difficult to prevent it remaining where it is now Besides, I passed my word, you know, and thatcannotbebroken Come,sitdown I’mthankfulyourhousewasso considerateastosparemysmoking-box,thoughithasgivenitashove of a few feet to the south’ard In other respects the house is an advantage,forwhileithasnothurttheview,itservestoprotectmybox from the quarter which used to be exposed to east winds But there is onestipulationIhavetomakeAngus,beforethebargainisclosed.” “An’whatmaythatpe?”askedAngus,withashadeofanxiety “Thatthissmoking-boxandthegroundonwhichitstands,togetherwith thefootpathleadinguptoit,shallremainmypropertyaslongasIlive.” Angussmiled Hehadthepeculiarityofturningthecornersofhismouth down instead of up when he did so, which gave a remarkably knowing looktohissmile “You shall pe fery welcome,” he said “And now, Muster Ruvnshaw, I cameheretosayawordformypoy YouknowitissnaturalthatIanwill pe getting anxious apout the wedding It iss impatient he will pe, whatever He is a little shy to speak to you himself, and he will pe botherin’meto—” “All right, Angus, I understand,” interrupted Mr Ravenshaw “You know bothheandLambertarebusyremovingyourbarnfrommylawn When thatisfinishedweshallhavetheweddings Myoldwomanwants’emto beonthesameday,butnothingcanbedonetillthebarnisremoved,for I mean to have the dance on that lawn on the double-wedding day So youcantellthemthat.” Angus did tell them that, and it is a remarkable fact which every one in the establishment observed, that the unsightly barn, which had so long disfiguredthelawnatWillowCreek,disappeared,asifbymagic,inone night,asCoraputit,“likethebaselessfabricofavision!” Time passed, and changed the face of nature entirely Wrecks were swept away; houses sprang up; fences were repaired; crops waved on the fields of Red River as of yore, and cattle browsed on the plains; so that if a stranger had visited that outlying settlement there would have beenlittletoinformhiseyesofthegreatdisasterwhichhadsorecently swept over the place But there would have been much to inform his ears,foritwasmanyadaybeforetheinterestandexcitementaboutthe greatfloodwentdown Infact,foralongtimeafterwardsthefloodwasso much in the thoughts and mouths of the people that they might have been mistaken for the immediate descendants of those who had swarmedontheslopesofArarat Letusnowpresentaseriesofpicturesforthereader’sinspection Thefirstisalittlelog-hutembosomedinbushes,withastatelytreerising close beside it Flowers and berries bedeck the surrounding shrubbery, pleasant perfumes fill the air A small garden, in which the useful and ornamental are blended, environs the hut The two windows are filled with glass, not parchment A rustic porch, covered with twining plants, conceals the door, and a general air of tidiness marks all the surroundings Need we say more to convince the intelligent reader that thisisthehutofoldLiz?Itoccupiesthespotwhereitwasdepositedby theflood,thefamilyhavingbeenallowedtoremainthere UnderthegeniusofHerrWinklemannandMichelRollintheoldhuthas displayed some characteristics of the cactus in sending forth offshoots fromitsownbody Anoffshootintherearisthekitchen;anotheronthe right is a mansion, as large nearly as the parent, in which Winklemann hasplacedhismother,tothegreatreliefofDaddy,whoneverforgot,and with difficulty forgave, the old woman’s kicking habits when their legs reposed together on the table It must be added, however, that the old people live on good terms, and that Mrs Winklemann frequently visits Daddy,andsmokeswithhim Theoffshootontheleft,builtbyMichel,isa stable,andanexcrescencebeyondisacow-house There,arefowlsin front of the hut, and flour, sugar, pork, and tea within, so it may be concludedthatthefamiliesarenowincomfort When the improvements just mentioned were completed, Michel Rollin, unabletosettledown,hadarrangedwithPeegwishandWildcattogooff onafishingexpedition Before starting he entered the hut, and said to Winklemann, who was fillinghis“moder’s”pipeforher— “YouvillbeherevenIcomeback?Youvillnotleavetheol’peepil?” “No;Ivillstopetillyouretoorns BesureIvilltakecareofzeeoldvons Butdereisnotmuchfearofanodorfloodjoostnow.” “What says he, Liz?” asked old Daddy, with a hand to his ear “Speak oot.” “Oh,he’sjisthaverin’aboottheflood Hesaysthere’snaefearo’anither flood,an’Ithinkhe’sabootright.” “I’mnosaesureo’that,”returnedDaddy,whosememoryforthepastwas much stronger than for current events “It’s been said, on the best authority, that there was a seemilar flood i’ the year seeventeen hunner an’ seeventy-sax, anither in seeventeen ninety, an’ anither in aughteen hunneran’nine.” “Hoots!haudyergab Whatdivyekenabootfloods?” Daddy, hearing nothing, and believing from the pleasant expression of Liz’s countenance that she appreciated his remarks, nodded to Mrs Winklemanncheerily,andsmiled “Ha!”laughedherson;“youisvonstranchbeing,oldLiz—verstranch.” Havingfinishedthefillingofhis“moder’s”pipeandlighteditforher,Herr WinklemannaroseandfollowedhisfriendMicheloutofthehut Letuslookatanotherpicture Itisapairofcottagesclosetoeachother,andaboutastone’scastfrom thefarmatWillowCreek Thebuildingsarenew,andmuchalikeinform and size There are well-tilled fields around, and fat cattle and a few sheep Theinsidesofthesemansionshavenotmuchtoboastofinthe wayofornament,butthereisenoughtodisplaytheinfluence,thegood taste,andtherefinementofwoman Immediately after the abating of the waters Ian Macdonald and Louis Lambert set to work to build these houses, and you may be sure they were not long about it, for the tyrannical old father-in-law elect not only compelledthemtotakedownthebarnonthelawnbeforetheweddings, butalsotobuildhousesfortheirbrides AndaftertheknotsweretiedandthedanceonthelawnatWillowCreek was over, and the happy couples were fairly established in their own homes, they kept open house for a long time, and interchanged innumerable visits between Bearclaw Cottage, (that was Ian’s), and Hunter’s Lodge, (that was Lambert’s), and the Ark on Ararat, (that was the house of Angus), and Willow Creek, insomuch that Tony was heard onedaytoinformMissTrimconfidentiallythathefounditdifficulttotell wherehelived,orwhichwashisproperhome—andMissTrimconfessed thatshewasinmuchthesameconditionofmind “What an amazing time we have passed through!” said Miss Trim, referringtotheflood,atoneoftheirsocialgatherings “Yes,”saidVictorhastily,forheknewthatMissTrimwasonthepointof deliveringoneofherparentheticalandpointlessorations,“itwasindeed anamazingtime!Suchboatingontheplains,andsuchcampingout!To saynothingoftumblingintothewaterandbeinghalfdrowned.” “Bytheway,”askedIan,“wasnotpoorJohnFlettnearlydrownedabout thebeginningoftheflood?” “Ofcoursehewas,”saidMrRavenshaw,“andifithadnotbeenforyour fatherheandhisfamilywouldhavebeenlostaltogether Isnotthatso, Angus?” “Well, it iss droont he would have been in all probabeelity,” said Angus, “for he was on the wrong road when I met him, an’ he couldn’t find the right wan, whatever Shon Flett iss a good man, but he iss also foolish Yousee,whenthewattercameonhimsostrongthathishoosebeganto slupaway,hetooktwoofhisoxenan’hetiedthemtogetherwi’ropes,an’ putplanksontheirbacks,whichhealsotied;ay!an’sohemadeasortof livin’stage,onwhichhesathiswifeandfourchildren;twoofthemwass poysandtheothertwowassgirls,whatever Thefrightenedcraterswent about the best way they could, sometimes wadin’ an’ sometimes sweemin’,an’Shon,hewassleadin’themwi’alineroondtheirhorns,an’ he wass wadin’ an’ sweemin’ also I came across them wi’ my post an’ tookthemin Thatwasjustpeforewesawthehooseonfirefloatin’down theriver.” “Thehouseonfire!”exclaimedCora;“Ididnothearofthat.” “Nowonder,”saidLambert “Therehavebeensomanystrangeincidents andhairbreadthescapesduringthefloodthatwewon’tlikelyhearabout themallformanyadaytocome.” “Butwhataboutthehouseonfire?”askedVictor;“wasanyoneinit?” “No, it was only a house that had been left somewhat hastily by its owners,whomusthaveforgottoputoutthefireorcapsizedsomething overit Atalleventsthehousewasseenfloatingdownstreamatnight, andasplendidsightitwas,burningfuriously,withtheflamesglitteringin thewaterthatsweptitaway.” “How sad!” said Elsie, whose mind dwelt on the evil rather than on the picturesqueaspectoftheincident “I can’t imagine what ever was the cause of the flood,” remarked Mrs Ravenshaw “Well,mydear,”saidherhusband,inasomewhatoraculartone,“noone cancertainlytellwhatcausedit,butmyownopinionisthatitwascaused by the unusual wetness of the fall You remember how it rained; well, whenthelakesandriverswereasfullastheycouldhold,andtheground wassoakinglikeafullsponge,thewintercameonussuddenlyandset all fast, thus preventing the water getting away Then came the snow, also unusually heavy Then came a late spring with a sudden burst of warmweather,andasouthwindforseveraldaysinsuccession,turning all this accumulation into water Red Lake, Otter-tail Lake, and Lake Traversoverflowed,asyouknow;theRedRivericeburstupandjammed against the solid ice of Lake Winnipeg, which stopped the current, and thuscausedtheoverflow That’smynotionabouttheflood Whetherit’s rightorno,whocantell?” “Your observations, sir, are fery goot, whatever,” said Angus, taking an unusuallylongdrawathispipe Turn we now to look upon one more picture It is on the shores of the great lake—Lake Winnipeg There among a tangled but picturesque massofreedsandbushes,acanoeisrestingonthereeds,and,notfar fromit,arudestructureofboughsandbarkhasbeensetup Itisopenin front, and before it burns a large fire, whose light, however, is paled by theeffulgenceoftheglorioussunasitdipsintothelake Petawanaquatisthere,seatedwithabookonhisknee,andadignified, yetslightlyperplexedexpressiononhisface HisfriendSinclairisthere too,teachinghimtoreadtheWordofGod Meekeye,faithfulpartnerand sympathiserwiththeredman,isalsothere;andbesidethemreclinesour friend Tony That child’s taste for hunting is strong Having been— accordingtoMissTrim’sreport—averygoodboyandremarkablydiligent at his lessons, he has been granted a holiday and permission to go ahunting with his red father He is tired after the day’s hunt, and reclines placidlyawaitingsupper,whichMeekeyewithdowncastlookprepares Having spent two hours over the Book that evening, Petawanaquat closeditslowlyandlookedup “You find it rather difficult to understand,” said Sinclair, with a pleasant smile Theredmanrose,drewhimselfup,and,turninghisblackeyes,likethe eagle,ontheflashingsun,stretchedouthishand “Mybrother,”hesaid,“beholdsthesun Canhetellwhereitcomesfrom, orwhitheritgoes?No;butheunderstandsthattheGreatSpiritguidesits course, and he is satisfied When Petawanaquat was a child he understood very little He is a man now, and understands a little more When the Great Spirit takes him up yonder, no doubt his mind shall be madebigger,anditshallbefilled ThebookthattheGreatSpirithassent is very big Some things in it are hard to understand, but the greatest thing of all is not hard There is but onethingneedful Is not Jesus the onething?Petawanaquatwishestoliveforever ToknowtheGreatSpirit and Jesus is to live for ever Petawanaquat has lived long and seen much Hehasseenmentorturemenlikeevilspirits Hehasseenscalps torn from men and women He has seen little ones dashed against the stones ThespiritofPetawanaquathasgroanedwithinhim—heknewnot why—perhaps the Great Spirit was speaking to him in his heart ‘Shall these deeds of evil never have an end?’ he asked, but there was no answer Now, an answer has come Jesus is the Saviour from sin All thingsshallbeputunderHim Whenthattimecomesallthingsshallbe good Atpresentgoodandevilaremixed.” The red man paused a moment, with a slightly troubled look, but the shadowpassedlikeafleetingcloudashedroppedhisarm,and,withan airofsimplehumility,satdownagainbesidehisfriend “Petawanaquatisonlyachild,”headded;“atpresentheisonlylearning Ingoodtimeheshallknowall.” The sun’s last rays were still gilding the horizon and flickering on the wavesofWinnipegwhenthetiredhunterslaydowntorest 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GeneralInformationAboutProjectGutenberg-tmelectronic works ProfessorMichaelS HartistheoriginatoroftheProjectGutenberg-tm conceptofalibraryofelectronicworksthatcouldbefreelyshared withanyone Forthirtyyears,heproducedanddistributedProject Gutenberg-tmeBookswithonlyaloosenetworkofvolunteersupport ProjectGutenberg-tmeBooksareoftencreatedfromseveralprinted editions,allofwhichareconfirmedasPublicDomainintheU.S unlessacopyrightnoticeisincluded Thus,wedonotnecessarily keepeBooksincompliancewithanyparticularpaperedition MostpeoplestartatourWebsitewhichhasthemainPGsearchfacility: http://www.gutenberg.org ThisWebsiteincludesinformationaboutProjectGutenberg-tm, includinghowtomakedonationstotheProjectGutenbergLiterary ArchiveFoundation,howtohelpproduceourneweBooks,andhowto subscribetoouremailnewslettertohearaboutneweBooks ... ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOK THE RED MAN'S REVENGE *** ProducedbyNickHodsonofLondon,England R.M Ballantyne "The Red Man's Revenge" ChapterOne ATaleof the Red RiverFlood Opens the Ball Ifevertherewasamanwhopossessedagemin the formofadaughter... with the scalping-knife, when Cora, who entered the room at the moment, sprang forward and wrenched the weaponfromhisgrasp “We’ll give them dinner after the shooting is over, shan’t we, father?”... war-whoop as he scampered up the trackwhichledto the house,anddisappearedover the browof the river’sbank The imp was joking!” exclaimed Mr Ravenshaw, as he stopped and wiped the coldperspirationfromhisbrow
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