The beauty and the bolshevist

72 1 0
  • Loading ...
1/72 trang

Thông tin tài liệu

Ngày đăng: 15/03/2020, 12:24

ProjectGutenberg'sTheBeautyandtheBolshevist,byAliceDuerMiller ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.net Title:TheBeautyandtheBolshevist Author:AliceDuerMiller ReleaseDate:August9,2004[EBook#13146] [Datelastupdated:October5,2004] Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHEBEAUTYANDTHEBOLSHEVIST*** ProducedbyMelissaEr-Raqabi,JoshuaHutchinsonandtheOnline DistributedProofreadingTeam 'IBegYourPardon IsThisaPrivateRaft?' 'IBegYourPardon IsThisaPrivateRaft?' THEBEAUTYANDTHE BOLSHEVIST ByALICEDUERMILLER Authorof"TheCharmSchool""LadiesmustLive""ComeoutoftheKitchen" etc Illustrated Harper&BrothersPublishers NewYorkandLondon PrintedintheUnitedStatesofAmerica PublishedOctober,1920 ILLUSTRATIONS "Ibegyourpardon Isthisaprivateraft?" "Mr Moreton,theNewportboatleavesatfive-thirty" "I'llbethereinfiveminutes,inalittlebluecar" "Supposeyoufindyoudohatebeingpoor?" CONTENTS ChapterI ChapterII ChapterIII ChapterI The editor of that much-abused New York daily, Liberty, pushed back his editorial typewriter and opened one letter in the pile which the office-boy—no respecterofpersons—hadjustlaiduponthedeskwhilewhistlingapiercingtune betweenhisteeth Thelettersaid: DEARBEN,—IhatetothinkwhatyourfeelingswillbeonlearningthatI am engaged to be married to a daughter of the capitalistic class Try to overcomeyourprejudices,however,andjudgeEugeniaasanindividualand notasamemberofaclass Shehasveryliberalideas,readsyourpaper,and is content to go with me to Monroe College and lead the life of an instructor's wife You will be glad to know that Mr Cord disapproves as muchasyoudo,andwillnotgivehisdaughteracent,sothatourlifewill beashardonthephysicalsideasyouinyourmostaffectionatemoments coulddesire Mr Cordisundertheimpressionthatlackofanincomewill coolmyardor Youseehecouldnotthinkworseofmeifheweremyown brother Yours, DAVID Thefinefaceoftheeditordarkened Itwasthefaceofanidealist—thedeep-set, slowlychangingeyes,thehighcheekbones,butthemouthclosedfirmly,almost obstinately,andcontradictedtherestofthefacewithatouchofaggressiveness, just as in Lincoln's face the dreamer was contradicted by the shrewd, practical mouth Hecrossedhisarmsabovetheelbowsothatonelonghanddangledon one side of his knees and one on the other—a favorite pose of his—and sat thinking The editor was often called a Bolshevist—as who is not in these days? For language is given us not only to conceal thought, but often to prevent it, and every now and then when the problems of the world become too complex and toovital,someonestopsallthoughtonasubjectbyinventingatag,like"witch" intheseventeenthcentury,or"Bolshevist"inthetwentieth Ben Moreton wasnota Bolshevist;indeed, he hadwrittenseveral editorialsto show that, in his opinion, their doctrines were not sound, but of course the people who denounced him never thought of reading his paper He was a socialist, a believer in government ownership, and, however equably he attemptedtoexamineanydisputebetweencapitalandlabor,healwaysfoundfor labor Hewasmuchdenouncedbyultraconservatives,andperhapstheirinstinct wassound,forhewaseducated,determined,andpossessedofapersonalitythat attached people warmly, so that he was more dangerous than those whose doctrinesweremoremilitant Hewasnotwhollytrustedbytheextremeradicals His views were not consistently agreeable to either group For instance, he believed that the conscientious objectors were really conscientious, a creed for which many people thought he ought to be deported On the other hand, he doubtedthatWallStreethadstartedthewarforitsownpurposes,askepticism whichmadesomeofhisfriendsthinkhimjustfitforabomb Thegreatproblemofhislifewashowtoholdtogetherabodyofliberalssothat they could be effective This problem was going to be immensely complicated bythemarriageofhisbrotherwiththedaughterofaconspicuouscapitalistlike WilliamCord Hepushedthebuzzeronhisdeskandwroteoutthefollowingtelegram: DavidMoreton,CareWilliamCord,Newport,R.I AmtakingboatNewportto-night Meetme Ben No one answered his buzzer, but presently a boy came in collecting copy, and Moretonsaidtohim: "Here,getthissent,andaskKleintocomehere He'sinthecomposingroom." And presently Mr Klein entered, in the characteristic dress of the newspaper man—namely,shirtsleevesandagreenshadeoverhiseyes "Lookhere,Ben!"heexclaimedinsomeexcitement "Here'sathousand-dollar checkjustcomeinforthestrikefund How'sthatforthesecondday?" "Good enough," said Ben, who would ordinarily have put in a good hour rejoicingoversuchunexpectedgoodfortune,butwhosemindwasnowonother things "Ihavetogooutoftownto-night You'llbehere,won'tyou,tolockthe presses?And,seehere,Leo,whatisthematterwithourbookpage?" "Prettyrottenpage,"repliedKlein "I should say it was—all about taxes and strikes and economic crises I told Greennevertotouchthosethingsinthebookreviews Ourreadersgetallthey wantofthatfromusinthenewsandtheeditorials—hotter,betterstuff,too I've toldhimnottotouch'eminthebookpage,andherunsnothingelse Heoughtto be beautiful—ought to talk about fairies, and poetry, and twelfth-century art What'sthematterwithhim?" "Hedoesn'tknowanything,"saidKlein "That'shistrouble He'sclever,buthe doesn't know much I guess he only began to read books a couple years ago They excite him too much He wouldn't read a fairy story He'd think he was wastingtime." "Getsomeonetohelphimout." "Who'dIget?" "Lookabout I'vegottogohomeandpackabag AskMissCoxwhattimethat Newportboatleaves." "Newport!Greatheavens,Ben!Whatisthis?Alittleweek-end?" "Alittleweakbrother,Leo." "Davidintroubleagain?" Moretonnodded "Hethinkshe'sgoingtomarryWilliamCord'sdaughter." Klein,whowasBen'sfriendaswellashisassistant,blanchedatthename "Cord's daughter!" he exclaimed, and if he had said Jack-the-ripper's, he could nothaveexpressedmorehorror "Nowisn'titqueer,"hewenton,musingly,"that David,broughtupashehasbeen,canseeanythingtoattracthiminagirllike that?" Ben was tidying his desk preparatory to departure—that is to say, he was pushingallthepapersfarenoughbacktoenablehimtoclosetherollertop,and heanswered,absently: "Oh,Isupposethey'reallprettymuchthesame—girls." "Why,whatdoyoumean?"saidLeo,reproachfully "Howcanagirlwho'sbeen broughtuptobeaparasite—todisplaythewealthofherfatherandhusband,and has never done a useful thing since she was born—Why, a woman was telling metheotherday—Igotcaughtinablockinthesubwayandshewasnextme— awfullyinteresting,shewas Shesewedinoneofthesefashionabledressmaking establishments—andthethingsshetoldmeaboutwhatthosewomenspendon their clothes—underclothes and furs and everything Now there must be somethingwrongwithawomanwhocanspendmoneyonthosethingswhenshe knows the agony of poverty right around her You can't compare that sort of womanwithaself-respecting,self-supportinggirl—" At this moment the door opened and Miss Cox entered She wore a shortsleeved, low-neck, pink-satin blouse, a white-satin skirt, open-work stockings, and slippers so high in the heels that her ankles turned inward Her hair was treated with henna and piled untidily on the top of her head She was exactly what Klein had described—a self-respecting, self-supporting girl, but, on a superficialacquaintance,menofCord'sgroupwouldhavethoughtquiteasbadly ofherasKleindidoffashionablewomen Theywouldhavebeenmistaken Miss Coxsupportedhermother,and,thoughonlyseventeen,deniedherselfallforms of enjoyment except dress and an occasional movie She was conscientious, hard-working, accurate, and virtuous She loved Ben, whom she regarded as wise,beautiful,andgenerous,butshewouldhavediedratherthanhavehimor anyoneknowit Sheundulatedintotheroom,droppedonehiplower thanthe other,placedher handuponitandsaid,withagooddealofenunciation: "Oh,Mr Moreton,theNewportboatleavesatfive-thirty." "Thankyouverymuch,MissCox,"saidBen,gravely,andshewentoutagain "ItwouldbeaterriblethingforDavetomakeamarriagelikethat,"Kleinwent onassoonasshehadgone,"gettingmixedupwiththosefellows Anditwould bebadforyou,Ben—" "Idon'tmeantogetmixedupwiththem,"saidBen "No,ImeanhavingDavedoit Itwouldkillthepaper;itwouldendangeryour wholeposition;andasforleadership,youcouldneverhope—" 'Mr Moreton,theNewportBoatLeavesatFive-thirty' 'Mr Moreton,theNewportBoatLeavesatFive-thirty' "Now,lookhere,Leo Youdon'tthinkIcanstopmybrother'smarryingbecause itmightbeapoorconnectionforme?Thepointisthatitwouldn'tbegoodfor Dave—to be a poorly tolerated hanger-on That's why I'm going hot-foot to Newport AndwhileI'mawaydotrytodosomethingaboutthebookpage Get me a culture-hound—get one of these Pater specialists from Harvard Or," he added, with sudden inspiration when his hand was already on the door, "get a woman—she'dhaveasenseofbeautyandwouldknowhowtojollyGreeninto agreeingwithher."Andwiththistheeditorwasgone It was the end of one of those burning weeks in August that New York often knows ThesunwentdownasredasbloodeveryeveningbehindthePalisades, andbeforethestreetsandroofshadceasedtoradiateheatthesunwasupagain above Long Island Sound, as hot and red as ever As Ben went uptown in the Sixth Avenue Elevated he could see pale children hanging over the railings of fireescapes,andbehindthemcatchglimpsesofdark,crowdedroomswhichhad all the disadvantages of caves without the coolness But to-day he was too concentratedonhisownproblemtonotice SinceBen'ssixteenthyearhisbrotherDavidhadbeendependentonhim Their father had been professor of economics in a college in that part of the United States which Easterners describe as the "Middle West." In the gay days when muck-raking was at its height Professor Moreton had lost his chair because he haddenouncedin hislectureroomfinancialoperationswhichto-daywould be againstthelaw Atthattimetheywerewellthoughtof,andevenpracticedbythe eminent philanthropist who had endowed the very chair which Moreton occupied The trustees felt that it was unkind and unnecessary to complicate theiralreadydifficultdutiesbysuchtactlessness,andtheirheartsbegantoturn againstMoreton,asmostofourheartsturnagainstthosewhomakelifetoohard forus Beforelongtheyaskedhimtoresignonaccountofhisage—hewasjust sixty and extremely vigorous; but immediately afterward, having been deeply surprisedandhurt,hedidwhatGoldsmithrecommendstolovelywomanunder 'SupposeYouFindYouDoHateBeingPoor?' 'SupposeYouFindYouDoHateBeingPoor?' Whentheyreachedthehousesheestablishedhiminthedrawing-roomandwent offtofindherfather Shewasatruewoman,bywhichismeantnowandalwaysthatshepreferredto allow a man to digest his dinner before she tried to bring him to a rational opinion But in this case her hands were tied The Cords dined at eight—or sometimesalittlelater,andBen'sboatleftforNewYorkathalfpastnine,sothat itwouldbeutterlyimpossibletopostponethediscussionofherfutureuntilafter dinner Ithadtobedoneatonce Crystal ran up and knocked at his bedroom door Loud splashings from the adjoiningbathroomwerealltheanswershegot Shesatdownonthestairsand waited Thosearethemomentsthattrymen'sandevenwomen'ssouls Forthe firsttimeherenterpriseseemedtoheralittlereckless Foraninstantshehadthe surprisingexperienceofrecognizingthefactthatBenwasatotalstranger She lookedatthegray-stonestairwayonwhichshewassittingandthoughtthather life had been as safe and sheltered as a cloister, and now, steered by this total stranger,sheproposedtolaunchherselfonanunchartedcourseofchange And to this program she was to bring her father's consent—for she knew very well that if she couldn't, Ben wouldn't be able to—in the comparatively short time betweennowanddinner Then,thesplashinghavingceased,thesoundofbureau drawerssucceeded,andCrystalsprangupandknockedagain "Thatyou,Peters?"saidanunencouragingvoice (PeterswasMr Cord'svalet.) "No,dear,it'sI,"saidCrystal "Oh,comein,"saidMr Cord Hewasstandinginthemiddleoftheroominhis shirt sleeves and gloomily contemplating the shirt he wore "What's this laundress,anyhow?ABolshevistorapastry-cook?"hesaid "Didyoueversee anythinglikethisshirt?" Crystalapproachedandstudiedtheshirt Itappearedtohertobeperfectlydone up, but she said: "Yes, dear, how terrible! I'll pack her off to-morrow, but you always look all right whatever you wear; that's some comfort." She saw that even this hadn't done much good, and, going to the heart of the problem, she asked,"Howdidyourgolfgo?" Mr Cord'sgloomgatheredasheanswered,withresignation,"Oh,allright." HismannerwasexactlysimilartoBen'sinhisrecentmomentofdepression,and notunlikeMcKellar'swhenhehadexplained whathesufferedunder the good Lord'sweather "IsEddie'sgameanybetter?"askedCrystal,feelingherway "No," cried her father, contemptuously "He's rotten, but I'm worse And golfclubs,Crystal!Noonecanmakeaclubanymore Haveyounoticedthat?But the truth of the matter is, I'm getting too old to play golf." And Mr Cord sat downwithagoodbutunconsciousimitationofabrokenoldman Of course Crystal swept this away She scolded him a little, pointed out his recentprowess,andspokeslightinglyofallyoungerathletes,butshereallyhad nottimetodothejobthoroughly,forthethoughtofBen,sittingsoanxiousin thedrawing-roomalone,hurriedheron "Anyhow, dear," she said, "I've come to talk to you about something terribly important Whatwouldyousay,father,ifItoldyouIwasengaged?" Mr Cordwassostartledthathesaid,whatwasrareforhim,thefirstthingthat cameintohishead: "NottoEddie?" Thetruediplomatist,wehavebeentold,simplytakesadvantageofchance,and Crystalwasdiplomatic "Andsupposeitis?"shereplied "Ishouldrefusemyconsent,"repliedherfather Crystal looked hurt "Is there anything against Eddie," she asked, "except his golf?" "Yes,"answeredherfather,"therearetwoofthemostseriousthingsintheworld againsthim—first,thathedoesn'tamounttoanything;andsecond,thatyoudon't lovehim." "No," Crystal admitted, "I don't, but then—love—father, isn't love rather a serious undertaking nowadays? Is it a particularly helpful adjunct to marriage? LookatpoorEugenia Isn'titreallymoresensibletomarryanicemanwhocan supportone,andthenifintimeonedoesfallinlovewithanotherman—" "Never let me hear you talk like that again, Crystal," said her father, with a severityandvigorheseldomshowedoutsideofboardmeetings "It'sonlyyour ignorance of life that saves you from being actually revolting I'm an old man andnotsentimental,you'llgrant,but,takemywordforit,loveistheonlyhope ofpullingoffmarriagesuccessfully,andeventhenit'snoteasy AsforEugenia,I thinkshe'smadeafoolofherselfandisgoingtobeunhappy,butI'dratherdo what she has done than what you're contemplating At least she cared for that fellow—" "I'm glad you feel like that, darling," said Crystal, "because it isn't Eddie I'm engagedto,butBenMoreton He'swaitingdownstairsnow." Mr Cordstartedup—hiseyesshininglikeblackflames "ByGod!Crystal,"hesaid,"yousha'n'tmarrythatfellow—Eugenia—perhaps— butnotyou." "But,father,yousaidyourself,youthoughthewasafine—" "Idon'tcarewhatIsaid,"repliedMr Cord,and,stridingtothedoor,heflungit open and called in a voice that rolled about the stone hall: "Mr Moreton, Mr Moreton!Comeuphere,willyou?" Ben came bounding up the stairs like a panther Cord beckoned him in with a sharpgestureandshutthedoor "Thiswon'tdoatall,Moreton,"hesaid "Youcan'thaveCrystal." Bendidnotanswer;helookedverysteadilyatCord,whowenton: "YouthinkIcan'tstopit—thatshe'sofageandthatyouwouldn'ttakeapennyof mymoney,anyhow That'stheidea,isn'tit?" "That'sit,"saidBen CordturnedsharplytoCrystal "DoeswhatIthinkmakeanydifferencetoyou?" heasked "Alot,dear,"sheanswered,"butIdon'tunderstand Youneverseemedsomuch opposedtotheradicaldoctrine." "No,it'stheradical,notthedoctrine,yourfatherobjectsto,"saidBen "Exactly,"answeredMr Cord "You'veputitinanutshell Crystal,I'mgoingto tell you what these radicals really are—they're failures—everyone of them Sincereenough—theywanttheworldchangedbecausetheyhaven'tbeenableto get along in it as it is—they want a new deal because theydon'tknow howto playtheircards;andwhentheygetanewhand,they'llplayitjustasbadly It's not their theories I object to, but them themselves You think if you married Moretonyou'dbegoingintoagreatnewworldofidealism Youwouldn't You'd be going into a world of failure—of the pettiest, most futile quarrels in the world Thechiefcharacteristicofthemanwhofailsisthathealwaysbelievesit's theotherfellow'sfault;andtheyhatethemanwhodifferswiththembyoneper cent more than they hate the man who differs by one hundred Has there ever beenarevolutionwheretheydidnotpersecutetheirfellowrevolutionistsworse thantheypersecutedtheoldorder,orwherethenewrulewasn'tmoretyrannical thantheold?" "Noonewoulddisputethat,"saidBen "Itistheonlywaytowinthroughto—" "Ah," said Cord, "I know what you're going to say, but I tell you, you win through to liberal practices when, and only when, the conservatives become convertedtoyourideas,andputthemthroughforyou That'swhyIsayIhave noquarrelwithradicaldoctrines—theyarecoming,alwayscoming,but"—Cord pausedtogivehiswordsfullweight—"Ihatetheradical." Therewasalittlepause Crystal,whohadsunkintoalowchair,raisedhereyes to Ben, as if she expected a passionate contradiction from him, but it did not come "Yes,"hesaid,afteramoment,"that'salltrue,Mr Cord—withlimitations;but, grantingit,you'veputmyside,too Whatarewetosayoftheconservative—the man who has no vision of his own—who has to go about stealing his beliefs fromtheotherside?He'sveryefficientatputtingthemintoeffect—butefficient asatool,asaservant Lookatthemesshemakesofhisowngamewhenhetries toactonhisown ideas He crushesdemocracywithanironefficiency,andhe creates communism He closes the door to trade-unionism and makes a revolution That'sefficiencyforyou Weradicalsarenotsodamnedinefficient, whilewelettheconservativesdoourworkforus." "Well,letitberevolution,then,"saidCord "Ibelieveyou'reright It'scoming, butdoyouwanttodragagirllikeCrystalintoit?Thinkofher!Sayyoutake her,asIsupposeayoungfellowlikeyoucando She'dhaveperhapstenyearsof anexcitingdivisionofallegiancebetweenyourideasandthewayshehadbeen broughtup,andtherestofherlife(for,believeme,aswegetolderweallreturn to our early traditions)—the rest of her life she'd spend regretting the ties and environmentofheryouth Ontheotherhand,ifshegivesyouupshewillhave regrets,too,Iknow,buttheywon'twreckherandembitterherthewaytheothers will." Ben'sfacedarkened Nomannotacolossalegotistcouldhearsuchaprophesy withindifference Hedidnotatonceanswer,andthenheturnedtoCrystal "Whatdoyouthinkofthat?"heasked Tothesurpriseofbothmen,Crystalrepliedwithalaugh "Iwaswondering,"she said,"wheneitherofyouwouldgetroundtoaskingwhatIthoughtofitall." "Well,whatdoyouthink?"saidCord,almostharshly Crystalrose,and,slippingherarmthroughhis,leanedherheadonthepointof herfather'sshoulder—hewasofagoodheight "Ithink,"shesaid,"youbothtalk beautifully Iwassoproudofyouboth—sayingsuchprofoundthingssoeasily, andkeepingyourtemperssoperfectly"(bothbrowssmoothedout),"anditwas all the more wonderful because, it seemed to me, you were both talking about thingsyouknewnothingabout." "Whatdoyoumean?"burstfrombothmenwithsimultaneousastonishment "Ben,dear,fatherdoesn'tknowanyradicals—exceptyou,andhe'sonlyseenyou twice Father dear, I don't believe Ben ever talked five minutes with an able, successfulconservativeuntilhecamehereto-day." "You'regoingtothrowmeover,Crystal?"saidBen,seeingherposemoreclearly thanheheardherwords "No,"saidMr Cord,bitterly,"she'sgoingtothrowoveranoldmaninfavorofa youngone." "Yousillycreatures,"saidCrystal,withasmilethatmadethewordsaffectionate andnotrude "HowcanIeverthroweitherofyouover?I'mgoingtobeBen's wife,andIammyfather'sdaughter I'mgoingtobethosetwothingsforallmy life." Bentookherhand Shepuzzledhim,butheadoredher "Butsomeday,Crystal," he said, "you will be obliged to choose between our views—mine or your father's Youmustseethat." "He'sright,"herfatherchimedin "Thisisnotatemporarydifferenceofopinion, youknow,Crystal Thiscleavageisasoldasmankind—theradicalagainstthe conservative Timedoesn'treconcilethem." Againtheideacametoher:"Theydolovetoformgangs,thepoordears."Aloud shesaid:"Yes,butthetwotypesarerarelypureones Why,father,youthinkBen isaradical,buthe'sthemosthideboundconservativeaboutsomethings—much worse than you—about free verse, for instance I read a long editorial about it notamonthago Hereallythinksanyonewhodefendsitoughttobedeportedto somepoeticlimbo Ben,youthinkmyfatherisconservative Butthere'sagreat scandalinhismentallife He'saBaconian—" "HethinksBaconwrotetheplays!"exclaimedBen,reallyshocked "CertainlyIdo,"answeredMr Cord "Everymanwhouseshismindmustthink so ThereisnothinginfavoroftheShakespearetheory,excepttradition—" Hewouldhavetalkedforseveralhoursuponthesubject,butCrystalinterrupted himbyturningtoBenandcontinuingwhatshehadmeanttosay: "WhenyousaidIshouldhavetochoosebetweenyourideas,youmeantbetween your political ideas Perhaps I shall, but I won't make my choice, rest assured, until I have some reason for believing that each of you knows something— honestlyknowssomethingabouttheotherone'spointofview." "Idon'tgetit,exactly,"saidBen SheaddressedMr Cord "Father,"shewenton,"BenhasalittleflatinCharlesStreet,andanoldservant, andthat'swhereI'mgoingtolive." Herfather,thoughbitterlywounded,hadregainedhissardoniccalm "Perhaps," hesaid,"you'llbringhimuptoSeventy-ninthStreetforSundaydinnernowand then." Crystalshookherhead "No,dear,"shesaid "Thatisn'tthewayit'sgoingtobe AssoonasIgetsettledandhavetimetolookaboutme,Ishalltakeanotherlittle flat for you You will live with us, for a few months in the winter, and get to know Ben's friends—his gang, as you would say—get to know them not as a philanthropist,oranemployer,oranobserver,butjustasoneofourfriends—see iftheyreallyarethewayyouthinktheyare Andthen,inMarchyoushallgooff toPalmBeachorVirginiajustasusual." "That's a fine idea," said Mr Cord, sarcastically "Do you realize that I shall hardlysurviveyourmarriagewiththeeditorofLiberty Ishallbekickedoff— requestedtoresignfromhalfadozenboardsforhavingsuchason-in-law—" "There'sfreedomforyou,"saidBen "And,"continuedMr Cord,"ifitwereknownthatIconsentedtothemarriage, andactuallyconsortedwithsuchfellows!Youmustrealize,Crystal,thatmostof the most influential men in the country think the way Eddie does Half my boardsarecomposedofolderEddies." "You'lldobettertoresignfromthem,then,"saidCrystal BenhadbeenverymuchstruckbyCrystal'ssuggestion "Really, Mr Cord," he said, "I believe that is a great idea of Crystal's I really believe if capital had more idea of the real views of labor—as you said, you eventually adopt all our ideas, why wouldn't an intimate knowledge of individualshurrythatprocess?" "Simply because I should lose all influence with my own people by merely investigatingyouinafriendlyspirit." "Glory!" exclaimed Ben, with open contempt for such people "Think of penalizingthefirsthonestattempttounderstand!" "Youseethepointofmyplan,don'tyou,Ben?"saidCrystal "YoubetIdo." "That's wonderful," she answered, "for you've only heard half of it In July, August, and September, we will come here to Newport, and you will get to understandfather's—" "Hold on," cried Ben, "just a moment That is absolutely impossible, Crystal Youdon'tunderstand Thepapercouldn'tkeepmeadayifIdidthat." "Ha!"criedMr Cord,comingsuddenlytolife "There'sfreedomforyou!" "Thatwouldbeverycrueloftheowners,Ben,butiftheydid—" "It wouldn't be cruel at all," said Moreton "They wouldn't have any choice I shouldhavelostallinfluencewithmyreaders,ifitwereknown—" "Glory!" said Mr Cord "Think of penalizing the first honest attempt to understandthecapitalisticclass!" Ben stood silent, caught in the grip of an intellectual dilemma which he felt everyinstantwoulddissolveitselfandwhichdidn't Crystalforthefirsttimemovedawayfromherfather "Thosearemyterms,"she said "Istaywiththemanwhoagreestothem,andifyoubothdeclinethem— well,I'llgooffandtryandopentheoysterbymyself." There was a long momentous pause, and then Tomes's discreet knock on the door "Mr Verrimanonthetelephone,madam." "Ican'tcome,"saidCrystal "Askhimtosendamessage." "Don't you see, Crystal, what your plan would do?" said her father "Either it wouldmakeMoretonaredrevolutionistandmeapersecutingBourbon,orelse itwouldjustruinusbothforeitherofourobjectives." "Itwon'truinyouformyobjectives,"saidCrystal,"andwomenaremorehuman, youknow,thanmen." Anotherknockatthedoor Tomes'svoiceagain: "Mr Verrimanwishestoknowifhemightdineherethisevening?" "No,"saidCord,lookingatCrystal Crystal raised her voice "Certainly, Tomes Say we shall be delighted to have him—ateight." Bothmenturnedtoher "Whydidyoudothat,Crystal?Verriman—here—to-night?" Crystal did not answer—the identity of their tones, their words, and their irritationwithhershouldhavetoldthemtheanswer,butdidn't SheknewthatonlyoppositiontoEddieandEddie'smanyprototypescouldweld hertwomensolidlytogether THEEND EndofProjectGutenberg'sTheBeautyandtheBolshevist,byAliceDuerMiller ***ENDOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHEBEAUTYANDTHEBOLSHEVIST*** *****Thisfileshouldbenamed13146-h.htmor13146-h.zip***** Thisandallassociatedfilesofvariousformatswillbefoundin: http://www.gutenberg.net/1/3/1/4/13146/ ProducedbyMelissaEr-Raqabi,JoshuaHutchinsonandtheOnline DistributedProofreadingTeam Updatededitionswillreplacethepreviousone theoldeditions willberenamed Creatingtheworksfrompublicdomainprinteditionsmeansthatno oneownsaUnitedStatescopyrightintheseworks,sotheFoundation (andyou!)cancopyanddistributeitintheUnitedStateswithout permissionandwithoutpayingcopyrightroyalties Specialrules, setforthintheGeneralTermsofUsepartofthislicense,applyto copyinganddistributingProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksto protectthePROJECTGUTENBERG-tmconceptandtrademark Project Gutenbergisaregisteredtrademark,andmaynotbeusedifyou chargefortheeBooks,unlessyoureceivespecificpermission Ifyou donotchargeanythingforcopiesofthiseBook,complyingwiththe rulesisveryeasy YoumayusethiseBookfornearlyanypurpose suchascreationofderivativeworks,reports,performancesand research Theymaybemodifiedandprintedandgivenaway youmaydo practicallyANYTHINGwithpublicdomaineBooks Redistributionis subjecttothetrademarklicense,especiallycommercial redistribution ***START:FULLLICENSE*** THEFULLPROJECTGUTENBERGLICENSE PLEASEREADTHISBEFOREYOUDISTRIBUTEORUSETHISWORK ToprotecttheProjectGutenberg-tmmissionofpromotingthefree distributionofelectronicworks,byusingordistributingthiswork (oranyotherworkassociatedinanywaywiththephrase"Project Gutenberg"),youagreetocomplywithallthetermsoftheFullProject Gutenberg-tmLicense(availablewiththisfileoronlineat http://gutenberg.net/license) Section1 GeneralTermsofUseandRedistributingProjectGutenberg-tm electronicworks 1.A ByreadingorusinganypartofthisProjectGutenberg-tm electronicwork,youindicatethatyouhaveread,understand,agreeto andacceptallthetermsofthislicenseandintellectualproperty (trademark/copyright)agreement Ifyoudonotagreetoabidebyall thetermsofthisagreement,youmustceaseusingandreturnordestroy allcopiesofProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksinyourpossession IfyoupaidafeeforobtainingacopyoforaccesstoaProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworkandyoudonotagreetobeboundbythe termsofthisagreement,youmayobtainarefundfromthepersonor entitytowhomyoupaidthefeeassetforthinparagraph1.E.8 1.B "ProjectGutenberg"isaregisteredtrademark Itmayonlybe usedonorassociatedinanywaywithanelectronicworkbypeoplewho agreetobeboundbythetermsofthisagreement Thereareafew thingsthatyoucandowithmostProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworks evenwithoutcomplyingwiththefulltermsofthisagreement See paragraph1.Cbelow TherearealotofthingsyoucandowithProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworksifyoufollowthetermsofthisagreement andhelppreservefreefutureaccesstoProjectGutenberg-tmelectronic works Seeparagraph1.Ebelow 1.C TheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation("theFoundation" orPGLAF),ownsacompilationcopyrightinthecollectionofProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworks Nearlyalltheindividualworksinthe collectionareinthepublicdomainintheUnitedStates Ifan individualworkisinthepublicdomainintheUnitedStatesandyouare locatedintheUnitedStates,wedonotclaimarighttopreventyoufrom copying,distributing,performing,displayingorcreatingderivative worksbasedontheworkaslongasallreferencestoProjectGutenberg areremoved Ofcourse,wehopethatyouwillsupporttheProject Gutenberg-tmmissionofpromotingfreeaccesstoelectronicworksby freelysharingProjectGutenberg-tmworksincompliancewiththetermsof thisagreementforkeepingtheProjectGutenberg-tmnameassociatedwith thework Youcaneasilycomplywiththetermsofthisagreementby keepingthisworkinthesameformatwithitsattachedfullProject Gutenberg-tmLicensewhenyoushareitwithoutchargewithothers 1.D Thecopyrightlawsoftheplacewhereyouarelocatedalsogovern whatyoucandowiththiswork Copyrightlawsinmostcountriesarein aconstantstateofchange IfyouareoutsidetheUnitedStates,check thelawsofyourcountryinadditiontothetermsofthisagreement beforedownloading,copying,displaying,performing,distributingor creatingderivativeworksbasedonthisworkoranyotherProject Gutenberg-tmwork TheFoundationmakesnorepresentationsconcerning thecopyrightstatusofanyworkinanycountryoutsidetheUnited States 1.E UnlessyouhaveremovedallreferencestoProjectGutenberg: 1.E.1 Thefollowingsentence,withactivelinksto,orotherimmediate accessto,thefullProjectGutenberg-tmLicensemustappearprominently wheneveranycopyofaProjectGutenberg-tmwork(anyworkonwhichthe phrase"ProjectGutenberg"appears,orwithwhichthephrase"Project Gutenberg"isassociated)isaccessed,displayed,performed,viewed, copiedordistributed: ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.net 1.E.2 IfanindividualProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworkisderived fromthepublicdomain(doesnotcontainanoticeindicatingthatitis postedwithpermissionofthecopyrightholder),theworkcanbecopied anddistributedtoanyoneintheUnitedStateswithoutpayinganyfees orcharges Ifyouareredistributingorprovidingaccesstoawork withthephrase"ProjectGutenberg"associatedwithorappearingonthe work,youmustcomplyeitherwiththerequirementsofparagraphs1.E.1 through1.E.7orobtainpermissionfortheuseoftheworkandthe ProjectGutenberg-tmtrademarkassetforthinparagraphs1.E.8or 1.E.9 1.E.3 IfanindividualProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworkisposted withthepermissionofthecopyrightholder,youruseanddistribution mustcomplywithbothparagraphs1.E.1through1.E.7andanyadditional termsimposedbythecopyrightholder Additionaltermswillbelinked totheProjectGutenberg-tmLicenseforallworkspostedwiththe permissionofthecopyrightholderfoundatthebeginningofthiswork 1.E.4 DonotunlinkordetachorremovethefullProjectGutenberg-tm Licensetermsfromthiswork,oranyfilescontainingapartofthis workoranyotherworkassociatedwithProjectGutenberg-tm 1.E.5 Donotcopy,display,perform,distributeorredistributethis electronicwork,oranypartofthiselectronicwork,without prominentlydisplayingthesentencesetforthinparagraph1.E.1with activelinksorimmediateaccesstothefulltermsoftheProject Gutenberg-tmLicense 1.E.6 Youmayconverttoanddistributethisworkinanybinary, compressed,markedup,nonproprietaryorproprietaryform,includingany wordprocessingorhypertextform However,ifyouprovideaccesstoor distributecopiesofaProjectGutenberg-tmworkinaformatotherthan "PlainVanillaASCII"orotherformatusedintheofficialversion postedontheofficialProjectGutenberg-tmwebsite(www.gutenberg.net), youmust,atnoadditionalcost,feeorexpensetotheuser,providea copy,ameansofexportingacopy,orameansofobtainingacopyupon request,oftheworkinitsoriginal"PlainVanillaASCII"orother form AnyalternateformatmustincludethefullProjectGutenberg-tm Licenseasspecifiedinparagraph1.E.1 1.E.7 Donotchargeafeeforaccessto,viewing,displaying, performing,copyingordistributinganyProjectGutenberg-tmworks unlessyoucomplywithparagraph1.E.8or1.E.9 1.E.8 Youmaychargeareasonablefeeforcopiesoforproviding accesstoordistributingProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksprovided that -Youpayaroyaltyfeeof20%ofthegrossprofitsyouderivefrom theuseofProjectGutenberg-tmworkscalculatedusingthemethod youalreadyusetocalculateyourapplicabletaxes Thefeeis owedtotheowneroftheProjectGutenberg-tmtrademark,buthe hasagreedtodonateroyaltiesunderthisparagraphtothe ProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation Royaltypayments mustbepaidwithin60daysfollowingeachdateonwhichyou prepare(orarelegallyrequiredtoprepare)yourperiodictax returns Royaltypaymentsshouldbeclearlymarkedassuchand senttotheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationatthe addressspecifiedinSection4,"Informationaboutdonationsto theProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation." -Youprovideafullrefundofanymoneypaidbyauserwhonotifies youinwriting(orbye-mail)within30daysofreceiptthats/he doesnotagreetothetermsofthefullProjectGutenberg-tm License Youmustrequiresuchausertoreturnor destroyallcopiesoftheworkspossessedinaphysicalmedium anddiscontinuealluseofandallaccesstoothercopiesof ProjectGutenberg-tmworks -Youprovide,inaccordancewithparagraph1.F.3,afullrefundofany moneypaidforaworkorareplacementcopy,ifadefectinthe electronicworkisdiscoveredandreportedtoyouwithin90days ofreceiptofthework -Youcomplywithallothertermsofthisagreementforfree distributionofProjectGutenberg-tmworks 1.E.9 IfyouwishtochargeafeeordistributeaProjectGutenberg-tm electronicworkorgroupofworksondifferenttermsthanareset forthinthisagreement,youmustobtainpermissioninwritingfrom boththeProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationandMichael Hart,theowneroftheProjectGutenberg-tmtrademark Contactthe FoundationassetforthinSection3below 1.F 1.F.1 ProjectGutenbergvolunteersandemployeesexpendconsiderable efforttoidentify,docopyrightresearchon,transcribeandproofread publicdomainworksincreatingtheProjectGutenberg-tm collection Despitetheseefforts,ProjectGutenberg-tmelectronic works,andthemediumonwhichtheymaybestored,maycontain "Defects,"suchas,butnotlimitedto,incomplete,inaccurateor corruptdata,transcriptionerrors,acopyrightorotherintellectual propertyinfringement,adefectiveordamageddiskorothermedium,a computervirus,orcomputercodesthatdamageorcannotbereadby yourequipment 1.F.2 LIMITEDWARRANTY,DISCLAIMEROFDAMAGES-Exceptforthe"Right ofReplacementorRefund"describedinparagraph1.F.3,theProject GutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation,theowneroftheProject Gutenberg-tmtrademark,andanyotherpartydistributingaProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworkunderthisagreement,disclaimall liabilitytoyoufordamages,costsandexpenses,includinglegal fees YOUAGREETHATYOUHAVENOREMEDIESFORNEGLIGENCE,STRICT LIABILITY,BREACHOFWARRANTYORBREACHOFCONTRACTEXCEPTTHOSE PROVIDEDINPARAGRAPHF3 YOUAGREETHATTHEFOUNDATION,THE TRADEMARKOWNER,ANDANYDISTRIBUTORUNDERTHISAGREEMENTWILLNOTBE LIABLETOYOUFORACTUAL,DIRECT,INDIRECT,CONSEQUENTIAL,PUNITIVEOR INCIDENTALDAMAGESEVENIFYOUGIVENOTICEOFTHEPOSSIBILITYOFSUCH DAMAGE 1.F.3 LIMITEDRIGHTOFREPLACEMENTORREFUND-Ifyoudiscovera defectinthiselectronicworkwithin90daysofreceivingit,youcan receivearefundofthemoney(ifany)youpaidforitbysendinga writtenexplanationtothepersonyoureceivedtheworkfrom Ifyou receivedtheworkonaphysicalmedium,youmustreturnthemediumwith yourwrittenexplanation Thepersonorentitythatprovidedyouwith thedefectiveworkmayelecttoprovideareplacementcopyinlieuofa refund Ifyoureceivedtheworkelectronically,thepersonorentity providingittoyoumaychoosetogiveyouasecondopportunityto receivetheworkelectronicallyinlieuofarefund Ifthesecondcopy isalsodefective,youmaydemandarefundinwritingwithoutfurther opportunitiestofixtheproblem 1.F.4 Exceptforthelimitedrightofreplacementorrefundsetforth inparagraph1.F.3,thisworkisprovidedtoyou'AS-IS'WITHNOOTHER WARRANTIESOFANYKIND,EXPRESSORIMPLIED,INCLUDINGBUTNOTLIMITEDTO WARRANTIESOFMERCHANTIBILITYORFITNESSFORANYPURPOSE 1.F.5 Somestatesdonotallowdisclaimersofcertainimplied warrantiesortheexclusionorlimitationofcertaintypesofdamages Ifanydisclaimerorlimitationsetforthinthisagreementviolatesthe lawofthestateapplicabletothisagreement,theagreementshallbe interpretedtomakethemaximumdisclaimerorlimitationpermittedby theapplicablestatelaw Theinvalidityorunenforceabilityofany provisionofthisagreementshallnotvoidtheremainingprovisions 1.F.6 INDEMNITY-YouagreetoindemnifyandholdtheFoundation,the trademarkowner,anyagentoremployeeoftheFoundation,anyone providingcopiesofProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksinaccordance withthisagreement,andanyvolunteersassociatedwiththeproduction, promotionanddistributionofProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworks, harmlessfromallliability,costsandexpenses,includinglegalfees, thatarisedirectlyorindirectlyfromanyofthefollowingwhichyoudo orcausetooccur:(a)distributionofthisoranyProjectGutenberg-tm work,(b)alteration,modification,oradditionsordeletionstoany ProjectGutenberg-tmwork,and(c)anyDefectyoucause Section InformationabouttheMissionofProjectGutenberg-tm ProjectGutenberg-tmissynonymouswiththefreedistributionof electronicworksinformatsreadablebythewidestvarietyofcomputers includingobsolete,old,middle-agedandnewcomputers Itexists becauseoftheeffortsofhundredsofvolunteersanddonationsfrom peopleinallwalksoflife Volunteersandfinancialsupporttoprovidevolunteerswiththe assistancetheyneed,iscriticaltoreachingProjectGutenberg-tm's goalsandensuringthattheProjectGutenberg-tmcollectionwill remainfreelyavailableforgenerationstocome In2001,theProject GutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationwascreatedtoprovideasecure andpermanentfutureforProjectGutenberg-tmandfuturegenerations TolearnmoreabouttheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation andhowyoureffortsanddonationscanhelp,seeSections3and4 andtheFoundationwebpageathttp://www.pglaf.org Section3 InformationabouttheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchive Foundation TheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationisanonprofit 501(c)(3)educationalcorporationorganizedunderthelawsofthe stateofMississippiandgrantedtaxexemptstatusbytheInternal RevenueService TheFoundation'sEINorfederaltaxidentification numberis64-6221541 Its501(c)(3)letterispostedat http://pglaf.org/fundraising ContributionstotheProjectGutenberg LiteraryArchiveFoundationaretaxdeductibletothefullextent permittedbyU.S federallawsandyourstate'slaws TheFoundation'sprincipalofficeislocatedat4557MelanDr S Fairbanks,AK,99712.,butitsvolunteersandemployeesarescattered throughoutnumerouslocations Itsbusinessofficeislocatedat 809North1500West,SaltLakeCity,UT84116,(801)596-1887,email business@pglaf.org Emailcontactlinksanduptodatecontact informationcanbefoundattheFoundation'swebsiteandofficial pageathttp://pglaf.org Foradditionalcontactinformation: Dr GregoryB Newby ChiefExecutiveandDirector gbnewby@pglaf.org Section4 InformationaboutDonationstotheProjectGutenberg LiteraryArchiveFoundation ProjectGutenberg-tmdependsuponandcannotsurvivewithoutwide spreadpublicsupportanddonationstocarryoutitsmissionof increasingthenumberofpublicdomainandlicensedworksthatcanbe freelydistributedinmachinereadableformaccessiblebythewidest arrayofequipmentincludingoutdatedequipment Manysmalldonations ($1to$5,000)areparticularlyimportanttomaintainingtaxexempt statuswiththeIRS TheFoundationiscommittedtocomplyingwiththelawsregulating charitiesandcharitabledonationsinall50statesoftheUnited States Compliancerequirementsarenotuniformandittakesa considerableeffort,muchpaperworkandmanyfeestomeetandkeepup withtheserequirements Wedonotsolicitdonationsinlocations wherewehavenotreceivedwrittenconfirmationofcompliance To SENDDONATIONSordeterminethestatusofcomplianceforany particularstatevisithttp://pglaf.org Whilewecannotanddonotsolicitcontributionsfromstateswherewe havenotmetthesolicitationrequirements,weknowofnoprohibition againstacceptingunsoliciteddonationsfromdonorsinsuchstateswho approachuswithofferstodonate Internationaldonationsaregratefullyaccepted,butwecannotmake anystatementsconcerningtaxtreatmentofdonationsreceivedfrom outsidetheUnitedStates U.S lawsaloneswampoursmallstaff PleasechecktheProjectGutenbergWebpagesforcurrentdonation methodsandaddresses Donationsareacceptedinanumberofother waysincludingincludingchecks,onlinepaymentsandcreditcard donations Todonate,pleasevisit:http://pglaf.org/donate Section5 GeneralInformationAboutProjectGutenberg-tmelectronic works ProfessorMichaelS HartistheoriginatoroftheProjectGutenberg-tm conceptofalibraryofelectronicworksthatcouldbefreelyshared withanyone Forthirtyyears,heproducedanddistributedProject Gutenberg-tmeBookswithonlyaloosenetworkofvolunteersupport ProjectGutenberg-tmeBooksareoftencreatedfromseveralprinted editions,allofwhichareconfirmedasPublicDomainintheU.S unlessacopyrightnoticeisincluded Thus,wedonotnecessarily keepeBooksincompliancewithanyparticularpaperedition MostpeoplestartatourWebsitewhichhasthemainPGsearchfacility: http://www.gutenberg.net ThisWebsiteincludesinformationaboutProjectGutenberg-tm, includinghowtomakedonationstotheProjectGutenbergLiterary ArchiveFoundation,howtohelpproduceourneweBooks,andhowto subscribetoouremailnewslettertohearaboutneweBooks ... because,applyinglateonaFridayevening,hehadnotbeenabletogetaroom, but partly because the moon and the southerly breeze and the silver shores of LongIsland and the red and whitelighthouseshadbeentoobeautifultoleave... performshismagiconit Here and there the hugeheadlightsofacarshoneon the roadway,magnifyingeveryrutin the asphalt, and bringingoutstrange,vivid shades in the grass and the hydrangea bushes They were... Benwonderedifitwerepossiblethattheywere contentwith the presentarrangement, and whethertheirwives and childrenwere notstiflingin the cityatthatverymoment Hecaughtasentencehere and there ashepassed "And, believeme,"onewassaying,"assoonashegotinto the box
- Xem thêm -

Xem thêm: The beauty and the bolshevist , The beauty and the bolshevist

Gợi ý tài liệu liên quan cho bạn