The story of the volsungs

199 2 0
  • Loading ...
1/199 trang
Tải xuống

Thông tin tài liệu

Ngày đăng: 14/03/2020, 18:30

ProjectGutenberg'sTheStoryoftheVolsungs,(VolsungaSaga),byAnonymous ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:TheStoryoftheVolsungs,(VolsungaSaga) WithExcerptsfromthePoeticEdda Author:Anonymous ReleaseDate:August7,2008[EBook#1152] LastUpdated:January15,2013 Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHESTORYOFTHEVOLSUNGS*** ProducedbyDouglasB Killings,andDavidWidger THESTORYOFTHEVOLSUNGS, (VOLSUNGASAGA) WITHEXCERPTSFROMTHEPOETICEDDA ByAnonymous Originally written in Icelandic (Old Norse) in the thirteenth century A.D., by an unknown hand However, most of the material is based substantially on previous works, some centuries older A few of these workshavebeenpreservedinthecollectionofNorsepoetryknownas the"PoeticEdda" The text of this edition is based on that published as "The Story of the Volsungs", translated by William Morris and Eirikr Magnusson (WalterScottPress,London,1888) DouglasB Killings SELECTEDBIBLIOGRAPHY:RECOMMENDEDREADING— Anonymous: "Kudrun", Translated by Marion E Gibbs & Sidney Johnson(GarlandPub.,NewYork,1992) Anonymous: "Nibelungenlied", Translated by A.T Hatto (Penguin Classics,London,1962) Saxo Grammaticus: "The First Nine Books of the Danish History", Translated by Oliver Elton (London, 1894; Reissued by the Online MedievalandClassicalLibraryasE-TextOMACL#28,1997) CONTENTS INTRODUCTION TRANSLATORS'PREFACE THESTORYOFTHEVOLSUNGSANDNIBLUNGS CHAPTERI OfSigi,theSonofOdin CHAPTERII Of the Birth of Volsung, the Son of Rerir, who wastheSonofSigi CHAPTERIII OftheSwordthatSigmund,Volsung'sson,drew fromtheBranstock CHAPTERIV HowKingSiggeirweddedSigny,andbadeKing VolsungandhissontoGothland CHAPTERV OftheSlayingofKingVolsung CHAPTER VI Of how Signy sent the Children of her and SiggeirtoSigmund CHAPTERVII OftheBirthofSinfjotlitheSonofSigmund CHAPTERVIII TheDeathofKingSiggeirandofSigny CHAPTER IX How Helgi, the son of Sigmund, won King HodbrodandhisRealm,andweddedSigrun CHAPTERX TheendingofSinfjotli,Sigmund'sSon CHAPTERXI Of King Sigmund's last Battle, and of how he mustyielduphisSwordagain CHAPTER XII Of the Shards of the Sword Gram, and how HjordiswenttoKingAlf CHAPTERXIII Of the Birth and Waxing of Sigurd Fafnir'sbane CHAPTERXIV Regin's tale of his Brothers, and of the Gold calledAndvari'sHoard CHAPTERXV Of the Welding together of the Shards of the SwordGram CHAPTERXVI TheprophecyofGrifir CHAPTERXVII OfSigurd'sAvengingofSigmundhisFather CHAPTERXVIII OftheSlayingoftheWormFafnir CHAPTERXIX OftheSlayingofRegin,SonofHreidmar CHAPTER XX Of Sigurd's Meeting with Brynhild on the Mountain CHAPTERXXI MoreWiseWordsofBrynhild CHAPTER XXII Of the Semblance and Array of Sigurd Fafnir's-bane CHAPTERXXIII SigurdcomestoHlymdale CHAPTERXXIV SigurdseesBrynhildatHlymdale CHAPTERXXV OftheDreamofGudrun,Giuki'sdaughter CHAPTERXXVI SigurdcomestotheGiukingsandiswedded toGudrun CHAPTERXXVII TheWooingofBrynhild CHAPTER XXVIII How the Queens held angry converse togetherattheBathing CHAPTERXXIX OfBrynhild'sgreatGriefandMourning CHAPTERXXX OftheSlayingofSigurdFafnir's-bane CHAPTERXXXI Of the Lamentation of Gudrun over Sigurd dead,asitistoldtoldinancientSongs CHAPTERXXXII OftheEndingofBrynhild CHAPTERXXXIII GudrunweddedtoAtli CHAPTERXXXIV AtlibidstheGiukingstohim CHAPTERXXXV TheDreamsoftheWivesoftheGiukings CHAPTERXXXVI OftheJourneyoftheGiukingstoKingAtli CHAPTERXXXVII TheBattleintheBurgofKingAtli CHAPTERXXXVIII OftheslayingoftheGiukings CHAPTERXXXIX TheEndofAtliandhisKinandFolk CHAPTERXL HowGudruncastherselfintotheSea,butwas broughtashoreagain CHAPTERXLI OftheWeddingandSlayingofSwanhild CHAPTERXLII GudrunsendsherSonstoavengeSwanhild CHAPTERXLIII TheLatterEndofalltheKinoftheGiukings APPENDIX:EXCERPTSFROMTHEPOETICEDDA PART OF THE SECOND LAY OF HELGI HUNDINGS-BANE(1) PARTOFTHELAYOFSIGRDRIFA(1) THELAYCALLEDTHESHORTLAYOFSIGURD THEHELL-RIDEOFBRYNHILD FRAGMENTSOFTHELAYOFBRYNHILD THESECONDORANCIENTLAYOFGUDRUN THESONGOFATLI THEWHETTINGOFGUDRUN THELAYOFHAMDIR THELAMENTOFODDRUN INTRODUCTION ItwouldseemfittingforaNorthernfolk,derivingthegreaterandbetterpart oftheirspeech,laws,andcustomsfromaNorthernroot,thattheNorthshouldbe tothem,ifnotaholyland,yetatleastaplacemoretoberegardedthananypart oftheworldbeside;thathowsoevertheirknowledgewidenedofothermen,the faithanddeedsoftheirforefatherswouldneverlackinterestforthem,butwould alwaysbekeptinremembrance Onecauseafteranotherhas,however,aidedin turningattentiontoclassicmenandlandsatthecostofourownhistory Among battles, "every schoolboy" knows the story of Marathon or Salamis, while it wouldbehardindeedtofindonewhodidmorethanrecognisethename,ifeven that,ofthegreatfightsofHafrsfirthorSticklestead Thelanguageandhistoryof Greece and Rome, their laws and religions, have been always held part of the learningneedfultoaneducatedman,butnotroublehasbeentakentomakehim familiarwithhisownpeopleortheirtongue EventhatEnglishmanwhoknew Alfred, Bede, Caedmon, as well as he knew Plato, Caesar, Cicero, or Pericles, would be hard bestead were he asked about the great peoples from whom we sprang;thewarringofHaroldFairhairorSaintOlaf;theViking(1)kingdomsin these(theBritish)WesternIsles;thesettlementofIceland,orevenofNormandy Theknowledgeofallthesethingswouldnowbeevensmallerthanitisamong uswereitnotthattherewasonelandleftwheretheoldenlearningfoundrefuge andwaskeptinbeing InEngland,Germany,andtherestofEurope,whatisleft ofthetraditionsofpagantimeshasbeenalteredinathousandwaysbyforeign influence, even as the peoples and their speech have been by the influx of foreign blood; but Iceland held to the old tongue that was once the universal speechofnorthernfolk,andheldalsothegreatstoresoftaleandpoemthatare slowly becoming once more the common heritage of their descendants The truth, care, and literary beauty of its records; the varied and strong life shown alike in tale and history; and the preservation of the old speech, character, and tradition—apeopleplacedapartastheIcelandershavebeen—combinetomake valuable what Iceland holds for us Not before 1770, when Bishop Percy translated Mallet's "Northern Antiquities", was anything known here of Icelandic,oritsliterature Onlywithinthelatterpartofthiscenturyhasitbeen studied,andinthebriefbook-listattheendofthisvolumemaybeseenthelittle that has been done as yet It is, however, becoming ever clearer, and to an increasingnumber,howsupremelyimportantisIcelandicasaword-hoardtothe English-speakingpeoples,andthatinitslegend,song,andstorythereisavery mine of noble and pleasant beauty and high manhood That which has been done, one may hope, is but the beginning of a great new birth, that shall give backtoourlanguageandliteratureallthatheedlessnessandignorancebidfair forawhiletodestroy The Scando-Gothic peoples who poured southward and westward over Europe, to shake empires and found kingdoms, to meet Greek and Roman in conflict, and levy tribute everywhere, had kept up their constantly-recruited wavesofincursion,untiltheyhadraisedabarrieroftheirownblood Itwastheir own kin, the sons of earlier invaders, who stayed the landward march of the NorthmeninthetimeofCharlemagne TotheSouthlandstheirroadbylandwas henceforth closed Then begins the day of the Vikings, who, for two hundred yearsandmore,"heldtheworldatransom."Undermanyandbraveleadersthey first of all came round the "Western Isles" (2) toward the end of the eighth century; soon after they invaded Normandy, and harried the coasts of France; gradually they lengthened their voyages until there was no shore of the then knownworlduponwhichtheywereunseenorunfelt AglanceatEnglishhistory willshowthelargepartofittheyfill,andhowtheytooktributefromtheAngloSaxons,who,bytheway,werefarnearerkintothemthanisusuallythought In Ireland,wheretheoldcivilisationwasfallingtopieces,theyfoundedkingdoms atLimerickandDublinamongotherplaces;(3)thelastnamed,ofwhichthefirst king, Olaf the White, was traditionally descended of Sigurd the Volsung, (4) endured even to the English invasion, when it was taken by men of the same Vikingbloodalittlealtered Whateffecttheyproduceduponthenativesmaybe seen from the description given by the unknown historian of the "Wars of the GaedhilwiththeGaill":"Inaword,althoughtherewereanhundredhard-steeled ironheadsononeneck,andanhundredsharp,ready,cool,never-rustingbrazen tongues in each head, and an hundred garrulous, loud, unceasing voices from eachtongue,theycouldnotrecount,ornarrate,orenumerate,ortellwhatallthe Gaedhil suffered in common—both men and women, laity and clergy, old and young, noble and ignoble—of hardship, and of injury, and of oppression, in every house, from these valiant, wrathful, purely pagan people Even though greatwerethiscruelty,oppression,andtyranny,thoughnumerousweretheoftvictorious clans of the many-familied Erinn; though numerous their kings, and their royal chiefs, and their princes; though numerous their heroes and champions,andtheirbravesoldiers,theirchiefsofvalourandrenownanddeeds ofarms;yetnotoneofthemwasabletogiverelief,alleviation,ordeliverance from that oppression and tyranny, from the numbers and multitudes, and the cruelty and the wrath of the brutal, ferocious, furious, untamed, implacable hordesbywhomthatoppressionwasinflicted,becauseoftheexcellenceoftheir polished, ample, treble, heavy, trusty, glittering corslets; and their hard, strong, valiantswords;andtheirwell-rivetedlongspears,andtheirready,brilliantarms ofvalourbesides;andbecauseofthegreatnessoftheirachievementsandoftheir deeds,theirbravery,andtheirvalour,theirstrength,andtheirvenom,andtheir ferocity,andbecauseoftheexcessoftheirthirstandtheirhungerforthebrave, fruitful, nobly-inhabited, full of cataracts, rivers, bays, pure, smooth-plained, sweetgrassylandofErinn"—(pp 52-53) Somepartofthis,however,mustbe abated,becausethechroniclerisexaltingtheterror-strikingenemythathemay still further exalt his own people, the Dal Cais, who did so much under Brian BoroimhetochecktheinroadsoftheNorthmen Whenabookdoes(5)appear, whichhasbeenannouncedthesetenyearspast,weshallhavemorematerialfor the reconstruction of the life of those times than is now anywhere accessible VikingearldomsalsoweretheOrkneys,Faroes,andShetlands Solateas1171, inthereignofHenryII.,theyearafterBeckett'smurder,EarlSweynAsleifsson ofOrkney,whohadlongbeentheterrorofthewesternseas,"faredasea-roving" andscouredthewesterncoastofEngland,Man,andtheeastofIreland,butwas killedinanattackonhiskinsmenofDublin Hehadusedtogouponaregular plan that may be taken as typical of the homely manner of most of his like in their cruising: "Sweyn had in the spring hard work, and made them lay down verymuchseed,andlookedmuchafterithimself Butwhenthattoilwasended, he fared away every spring on a viking-voyage, and harried about among the southern isles and Ireland, and came home after midsummer That he called spring-viking Thenhewasathomeuntilthecorn-fieldswerereapeddown,and thegrainseentoandstored Thenhefaredawayonaviking-voyage,andthenhe did not come home till the winter was one month off, and that he called his autumn-viking."(6) Toward the end of the ninth century Harold Fairhair, either spurred by the example of Charlemagne, or really prompted, as Snorri Sturluson tells us, resolved to bring all Norway under him As Snorri has it in "Heimskringla": "KingHaroldsenthismentoagirlhightGyda Thekingwantedherforhis leman;forshewaswondrousbeautifulbutofhighmoodwithal Nowwhenthe messengerscamethereandgavetheirmessagetoher,shemadeanswerthatshe wouldnotthrowherselfawayeventotakeakingforherhusband,whoswayed nogreaterkingdomthanafewdistricts;'Andmethinks,'saidshe,'itisamarvel thatnokinghereinNorwaywillputallthelandunderhim,afterthefashionthat GormtheOlddidinDenmark,orEricatUpsala.'Themessengersdeemedthisa WhentheywokeupSigurd Fromoutofslumber, Andinbedthousat'stup 'Midthebanes-men'slaughter "Thenwhenthybed=gear, Blue-white,wellwoven Byartofcraftsmen Allswamwiththyking'sblood; TheSigurddied, O'erhisdeadcorpsethousattest, Notheedingaughtgladsome, SinceGunnarsowilledit "GreatgriefforAtli GatstthoubyErp'smurder, AndtheendofthineEitil, Butworsegriefforthyself Goodtousesword Fortheslayingofothers Insuchwisethatitsedge Shallnotturnonourselves!" ThenwellspakeSorli Fromaheartfullofwisdom: "NowordswillI Makewithmymother, Thoughbothyetwain Needwordsbelike— Whataskestthou,Gudrun, Tolettheegogreeting? "Weepforthybrethren, Weepforthysweetsons, Andthynighestkinsfolk Laidbythefight-side! Yea,andthouGudrun, May'stgreetforustwain Sittingfeyonoursteeds Doomedinfarlandstodie." Fromthegarthforththeywent Withheartsfulloffury, SorliandHamdir, ThesonsofGudrun, Andtheymetontheway Thewiseinallwiles: "AndthoulittleErp, Whathelpingfromthee?" Heofalienwomb Spakeoutinsuchwise: "Goodhelpformykin, Suchasfootgivestofoot, Orflesh-coveredhand Givesuntohand!" "Whathelpingforfoot Thathelpthatfootgiveth, Orforflesh-coveredhand Thehelpingofhand?" ThenspakeErp Yetonceagain Mockspaketheprince Ashesatonhissteed: "Fool'sdeedtoshow Thewaytoadastard!" "Boldbeyondmeasure," Quoththey,"isthebase-born!" Outfromthesheath Drewtheythesheath-steel, Andtheglaives'edgesplayed Forthepleasureofhell; Bythethirdparttheyminished Themightthattheyhad, Theiryoungkintheyletlie A-coldontheearth Thentheirfur-cloakstheyshook Andboundfasttheirswords, Inwebsgoodlywoven Thosegreatoneswereclad; Youngtheywento'erthefells Wherethedewwasnew-fallen Swift,onsteedsoftheHuns, Heavyvengeancetowreak Forthstretchedtheways, Andanillwaytheyfound, Yea,theirsister'sson(1) Hangingslainupontree— Wolf-treesbythewindmadecold Atthetown'swestward Loudwithcranes'clatter— Illabidingtherelong! Dinintheking'shall Ofmenmerrywithdrink, Andnonemighthearken Thehorses'tramping Oreverthewarders Theirgreathornwinded Thenmenwentforth ToJormunrek Totelloftheheeding Ofmenunderhelm: "Giveyegoodcounsel! Greatonesarecomehither, Forthewrongofmenmighty Wasthemaytodeathtrodden." "LoudJormunreklaughed, Andlaidhandtohisbeard, Norbadebringhisbyrny, Butwiththewinefighting, Shookhisredlocks, Onhiswhiteshieldsatstaring, Andinhishand Swungthegoldcuponhigh "Sweetsightforme Thosetwaintoseteyeson, SorliandHamdir, Hereinmyhall! Thenwithbowstrings WouldIbindthem, AndhangthegoodGiukings Aloftonthegallows!" ThenspakeHrothglod Fromoffthehighsteps, Spaketheslim-fingered Untoherson,— —Forathreatwascastforth Ofwhatne'ershouldfall— "Shalltwomenalone TwohundredGothfolk Bindorbeardown Inthemidstoftheirburg?" Strifeanddininthehall, Cupssmittenasunder Menlaylowinblood FromthebreastsofGothsflowing ThenspakeHamdir, Thehigh-hearted: "Thoucravedst,Oking, Fromthecomingofus, Thesonsofonemother, Amidmostthinehall— Lookonthesehandsofthine, Lookonthesefeetofthine, Castbyus,Jormunrek, Ontotheflame!" Thencriedaloud ThehighGods'kinsman(2) Boldunderbyrny,— Roaredheasbearsroar; "Stonestothestoutones Thatthespearsbitenot, Northeedgesofsteel, ThesesonsofJonakr!" QUOTHSORLI: "Bale,brother,wroughtstthou Bythatbag's(3)opening, Oftfromthatbag Redeofbalecometh! Hearthastthou,Hamdir, Ifthouhadstheart'swisdom Greatlackinaman Wholackswisdomandlore!" HAMDIRSAID: "Yes,offwerethehead IfErpwerealiveyet, Ourbrotherthebold Whomweslewbytheway; Thefar-famedthroughtheworld— Ah,thefaresdravemeon, Andthemanwarmadeholy, TheremustIslay!" SORLISAID: "Unmeetweshoulddo Asthedoingsofwolvesare, Raisingwrongeach'gainstother AsthedogsoftheNorns, Thegreedyonesnourished Inwastesteadsoftheworld Instrongwisehavewefought, OnGoths'corpseswestand, Beatdownbyouredges, E'enasernesonthebough Greatfameourmightwinneth, Diewenow,orto-morrow,— Nomanlivestilleve Whomthefatesdoomatmorning." Atthehall'sgable-end FellSorlitoearth, ButHamdirlaylow Atthebackofthehouses NowthisiscalledtheAncientLayofHamdir ENDNOTES: (1) Randver,thesonoftheirsister'shusband (2) Odin,namely (3) "Bag",hismouth THELAMENTOFODDRUN TherewasakinghightHeidrik,andhisdaughterwascalledBorgny,andthe name of her lover was Vilmund Now she might nowise be made lighter of a childshetravailedwith,beforeOddrun,Atil'ssister,cametoher,—shewhohad beentheloveofGunnar,Giuki'sson Butoftheirspeechtogetherhasthisbeen sung: Ihaveheartell Inancienttales Howamaytherecame ToMorna-land, Becausenoman Onmouldabiding ForHeidrik'sdaughter Mightwinhealing AllthatheardOddrun, Atil'ssister, Howthatthedamsel Hadheavysickness, Sosheledfromstall Herbridledsteed, Andontheswartone Laidthesaddle Shemadeherhorsewend O'ersmoothwaysofearth, Untiltoahigh-built Hallshecame; Thenthesaddleshehad Fromthehungryhorse, Andherwayswended Inalongthewidehall, Andthiswordfirst Spakeforththerewith: "Whatismostfamed, AfieldinHunland, Orwhatmaybe BlithestinHunland?" QUOTHTHEHANDMAID: "HereliethBorgny, Bornedownbytrouble, Thysweetfriend,OOddrun, Seetoherhelping!" ODDRUNSAID: "Whoofthelords Hathlaidthisgriefonher, Whyistheanguish OfBorgnysoweary?" THEHANDMAIDSAID: "HeishightVilmund, Friendofhawk-bearers, Hewrappedthedamsel Inthewarmbed-gear Fivewinterslong Withoutherfather'swotting." Nomorethanthis Theyspakemethinks; Kindsatshedown Bythedamsel'sknee; MightilysandOddrun, Sharppiercingsongs ByBorgny'sside: Tillamaidandaboy Mighttreadontheworld'sways, Blithebabesandsweet OfHogni'sbane: Thenthedamselforewearied Thewordtookup, Thefirstwordofall Thathadwonfromher: "Somayhelpthee Allhelpfulthings, FeyandFreyia, AndallthefairGods, Asthouhastthrust Thistormentfromme!" ODDRUNSAID: "YetnohearthadI Forthyhelping, Sinceneverwertthou Worthyofhelping, ButmywordIheldto, Thatofoldwasspoken Whenthehighlords Dealtouttheheritage, Thateverysoul Iwouldeverhelp." BORGNYSAID: "Rightmadartthou,Oddrun, Andreftofthywits, Whereasthouspeakest Hardwordstome Thyfellowever Upontheearth Asofbrotherstwain, Wehadbeenborn." ODDRUNSAID: "WellImindmeyet, Whatthousaidstthatevening, WhenasIboreforth FairdrinkforGunnar; Suchathing,saidstthou, Shouldfalloutnever, Foranymay Saveformealone." Mindhadthedamsel Ofthewearyday Whenasthehighlords Dealtouttheheritage, Andshesatherdown, Thesorrowfulwoman, Totellofthebale, Andtheheavytrouble "NourishedwasI Inthehallofkings— Mostfolkwereglad— 'Midthecouncilofgreatones: InfairlifelivedI, Andthewealthofmyfather Forfivewintersonly, Whileyethehadlife "Suchwerethelastwords Thateverhespake, Thekingforewearied, Erehiswayshewent; Forhebadefolkgiveme Thegoldred-gleaming, AndgivemeinSouthlands TothesonofGrimhild "ButBrynhildhebade Tothehelmtobetakeher, AndsaidthatDeath-chooser Sheshouldbecome; Andthatnobetter Mighteverbeborn Intotheworld, Iffatewouldnotspoilit "Brynhildinbower Sewedatherbroidery, Folkshehad Andfairlandsabouther; Earthlaya-sleeping, Slepttheheavensaloft WhenFafnir's-bane Theburgfirstsaw "Thenwaswarwaged WiththeWelsh-wroughtsword Andtheburgallbroken ThatBrynhildowned; Norworelongspace, E'enaswellmightbe, Ereallthosewiles Fullwellsheknew "Hardanddreadful Wasthevengeanceshedrewdown, Sothatallwe Havewoeenow Throughalllandsoftheworld Shallthatstoryfareforth Howshedidhertodeath ForthedeathofSigurd "ButtherewithalGunnar Thegold-scatterer DidIfalltoloving Andshouldhavelovedhim Ringsofredgold WouldtheygivetoAtli, Wouldgivetomybrother Thingsgoodlyandgreat "Yea,fifteensteads Wouldtheygiveforme, AndtheloadofGrani Tohaveasagift; ButthenspakeAtli, Thatsuchwashiswill, Nevergifttotake FromthesonsofGiuki "Butweinnowise Mightlovewithstand, AndmineheadmustIlay Onmylove,thering-breaker; Andmanytherewere Amongmykin, Whosaidthatthey Hadseenustogether "ThenAtlisaid ThatIsurelynever Wouldfalltocrime Orshamefulfolly: Butnowletnoone Foranyother, Thatshamedeny Wherelovehasdealing "ForAtlisent Hisserving-folk Widethroughthemurkwood Prooftowinofme, Andthithertheycame Wheretheyne'ershouldhavecome, Whereonebedwetwain Haddightbetwixtus "Tothosemenhadwegiven Ringsofredgold, Naughttotell ThereoftoAtli, Butstraighttheyhastened Hometothehouse, Andallthetale ToAtlitold 'WhereasfromGudrun Welltheyhidit, Thoughbetterbyhalf Hadshehaveknownit "Dinwastheretohear Ofthehoofsgold-shod, Whenintothegarth RodethesonsofGiuki "TherefromHogni Thehearttheycut, Butintotheworm-close Casttheother Theretheking,thewise-hearted, Swepthisharp-strings, Forthemightking Hadevermind ThatItohishelping Soonshouldcome "ButnowwasIgone Yetonceagain UntoGeirmund, Goodfeasttomake; YethadIhearing, E'enoutfromHlesey, Howofsoretrouble Theharp-stringssang "SoIbadethebondmaids Bereadyswiftly, ForIlistedtosave Thelifeoftheking, Andweletourship Swimoverthesound, TillAtli'sdwelling Wesawallclearly Thencamethewretch(1) Crawlingout, E'enAtli'smother, Allsorrowuponher! Agravegathersting IntheheartofGunnar, Sothatnohelping Wasleftformyhero "Ogold-cladwoman, FulloftIwonder HowImylife Stillholdthereafter, FormethoughtIloved Thatlightinbattle, Theswiftwiththesword, Asmyveryself "Thouhastsatandhearkened AsIhavetoldthee Ofmanyanill-fate, Mineandtheirs— Eachmanliveth E'enashemaylive— Nowhathgoneforth ThegreetingofOddrun." ENDNOTES: (1) Atli'smothertooktheformoftheonlyadderthatwasnot lulledtosleepbyGunnar'sharp-playing,andwhoslewhim EndoftheProjectGutenbergEBookofTheStoryoftheVolsungs,(Volsunga Saga),byAnonymous ***ENDOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHESTORYOFTHEVOLSUNGS*** *****Thisfileshouldbenamed1152-h.htmor1152-h.zip***** Thisandallassociatedfilesofvariousformatswillbefoundin: http://www.gutenberg.org/1/1/5/1152/ ProducedbyDouglasB Killings,andDavidWidger Updatededitionswillreplacethepreviousone theoldeditions willberenamed Creatingtheworksfrompublicdomainprinteditionsmeansthatno oneownsaUnitedStatescopyrightintheseworks,sotheFoundation (andyou!)cancopyanddistributeitintheUnitedStateswithout permissionandwithoutpayingcopyrightroyalties Specialrules, setforthintheGeneralTermsofUsepartofthislicense,applyto copyinganddistributingProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksto protectthePROJECTGUTENBERG-tmconceptandtrademark Project Gutenbergisaregisteredtrademark,andmaynotbeusedifyou chargefortheeBooks,unlessyoureceivespecificpermission Ifyou donotchargeanythingforcopiesofthiseBook,complyingwiththe rulesisveryeasy YoumayusethiseBookfornearlyanypurpose suchascreationofderivativeworks,reports,performancesand research Theymaybemodifiedandprintedandgivenaway youmaydo practicallyANYTHINGwithpublicdomaineBooks Redistributionis subjecttothetrademarklicense,especiallycommercial redistribution ***START:FULLLICENSE*** THEFULLPROJECTGUTENBERGLICENSE PLEASEREADTHISBEFOREYOUDISTRIBUTEORUSETHISWORK ToprotecttheProjectGutenberg-tmmissionofpromotingthefree distributionofelectronicworks,byusingordistributingthiswork (oranyotherworkassociatedinanywaywiththephrase"Project Gutenberg"),youagreetocomplywithallthetermsoftheFullProject Gutenberg-tmLicense(availablewiththisfileoronlineat http://gutenberg.org/license) Section1 GeneralTermsofUseandRedistributingProjectGutenberg-tm electronicworks 1.A ByreadingorusinganypartofthisProjectGutenberg-tm electronicwork,youindicatethatyouhaveread,understand,agreeto andacceptallthetermsofthislicenseandintellectualproperty (trademark/copyright)agreement Ifyoudonotagreetoabidebyall thetermsofthisagreement,youmustceaseusingandreturnordestroy allcopiesofProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksinyourpossession IfyoupaidafeeforobtainingacopyoforaccesstoaProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworkandyoudonotagreetobeboundbythe termsofthisagreement,youmayobtainarefundfromthepersonor entitytowhomyoupaidthefeeassetforthinparagraph1.E.8 1.B "ProjectGutenberg"isaregisteredtrademark Itmayonlybe usedonorassociatedinanywaywithanelectronicworkbypeoplewho agreetobeboundbythetermsofthisagreement Thereareafew thingsthatyoucandowithmostProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworks evenwithoutcomplyingwiththefulltermsofthisagreement See paragraph1.Cbelow TherearealotofthingsyoucandowithProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworksifyoufollowthetermsofthisagreement andhelppreservefreefutureaccesstoProjectGutenberg-tmelectronic works Seeparagraph1.Ebelow 1.C TheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation("theFoundation" orPGLAF),ownsacompilationcopyrightinthecollectionofProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworks Nearlyalltheindividualworksinthe collectionareinthepublicdomainintheUnitedStates Ifan individualworkisinthepublicdomainintheUnitedStatesandyouare locatedintheUnitedStates,wedonotclaimarighttopreventyoufrom copying,distributing,performing,displayingorcreatingderivative worksbasedontheworkaslongasallreferencestoProjectGutenberg areremoved Ofcourse,wehopethatyouwillsupporttheProject Gutenberg-tmmissionofpromotingfreeaccesstoelectronicworksby freelysharingProjectGutenberg-tmworksincompliancewiththetermsof thisagreementforkeepingtheProjectGutenberg-tmnameassociatedwith thework Youcaneasilycomplywiththetermsofthisagreementby keepingthisworkinthesameformatwithitsattachedfullProject Gutenberg-tmLicensewhenyoushareitwithoutchargewithothers 1.D Thecopyrightlawsoftheplacewhereyouarelocatedalsogovern whatyoucandowiththiswork Copyrightlawsinmostcountriesarein aconstantstateofchange IfyouareoutsidetheUnitedStates,check thelawsofyourcountryinadditiontothetermsofthisagreement beforedownloading,copying,displaying,performing,distributingor creatingderivativeworksbasedonthisworkoranyotherProject Gutenberg-tmwork TheFoundationmakesnorepresentationsconcerning thecopyrightstatusofanyworkinanycountryoutsidetheUnited States 1.E UnlessyouhaveremovedallreferencestoProjectGutenberg: 1.E.1 Thefollowingsentence,withactivelinksto,orotherimmediate accessto,thefullProjectGutenberg-tmLicensemustappearprominently wheneveranycopyofaProjectGutenberg-tmwork(anyworkonwhichthe phrase"ProjectGutenberg"appears,orwithwhichthephrase"Project Gutenberg"isassociated)isaccessed,displayed,performed,viewed, copiedordistributed: ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org 1.E.2 IfanindividualProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworkisderived fromthepublicdomain(doesnotcontainanoticeindicatingthatitis postedwithpermissionofthecopyrightholder),theworkcanbecopied anddistributedtoanyoneintheUnitedStateswithoutpayinganyfees orcharges Ifyouareredistributingorprovidingaccesstoawork withthephrase"ProjectGutenberg"associatedwithorappearingonthe work,youmustcomplyeitherwiththerequirementsofparagraphs1.E.1 through1.E.7orobtainpermissionfortheuseoftheworkandthe ProjectGutenberg-tmtrademarkassetforthinparagraphs1.E.8or 1.E.9 1.E.3 IfanindividualProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworkisposted withthepermissionofthecopyrightholder,youruseanddistribution mustcomplywithbothparagraphs1.E.1through1.E.7andanyadditional termsimposedbythecopyrightholder Additionaltermswillbelinked totheProjectGutenberg-tmLicenseforallworkspostedwiththe permissionofthecopyrightholderfoundatthebeginningofthiswork 1.E.4 DonotunlinkordetachorremovethefullProjectGutenberg-tm Licensetermsfromthiswork,oranyfilescontainingapartofthis workoranyotherworkassociatedwithProjectGutenberg-tm 1.E.5 Donotcopy,display,perform,distributeorredistributethis electronicwork,oranypartofthiselectronicwork,without prominentlydisplayingthesentencesetforthinparagraph1.E.1with activelinksorimmediateaccesstothefulltermsoftheProject Gutenberg-tmLicense 1.E.6 Youmayconverttoanddistributethisworkinanybinary, compressed,markedup,nonproprietaryorproprietaryform,includingany wordprocessingorhypertextform However,ifyouprovideaccesstoor distributecopiesofaProjectGutenberg-tmworkinaformatotherthan "PlainVanillaASCII"orotherformatusedintheofficialversion postedontheofficialProjectGutenberg-tmwebsite(www.gutenberg.org), youmust,atnoadditionalcost,feeorexpensetotheuser,providea copy,ameansofexportingacopy,orameansofobtainingacopyupon request,oftheworkinitsoriginal"PlainVanillaASCII"orother form AnyalternateformatmustincludethefullProjectGutenberg-tm Licenseasspecifiedinparagraph1.E.1 1.E.7 Donotchargeafeeforaccessto,viewing,displaying, performing,copyingordistributinganyProjectGutenberg-tmworks unlessyoucomplywithparagraph1.E.8or1.E.9 1.E.8 Youmaychargeareasonablefeeforcopiesoforproviding accesstoordistributingProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksprovided that -Youpayaroyaltyfeeof20%ofthegrossprofitsyouderivefrom theuseofProjectGutenberg-tmworkscalculatedusingthemethod youalreadyusetocalculateyourapplicabletaxes Thefeeis owedtotheowneroftheProjectGutenberg-tmtrademark,buthe hasagreedtodonateroyaltiesunderthisparagraphtothe ProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation Royaltypayments mustbepaidwithin60daysfollowingeachdateonwhichyou prepare(orarelegallyrequiredtoprepare)yourperiodictax returns Royaltypaymentsshouldbeclearlymarkedassuchand senttotheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationatthe addressspecifiedinSection4,"Informationaboutdonationsto theProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation." -Youprovideafullrefundofanymoneypaidbyauserwhonotifies youinwriting(orbye-mail)within30daysofreceiptthats/he doesnotagreetothetermsofthefullProjectGutenberg-tm License Youmustrequiresuchausertoreturnor destroyallcopiesoftheworkspossessedinaphysicalmedium anddiscontinuealluseofandallaccesstoothercopiesof ProjectGutenberg-tmworks -Youprovide,inaccordancewithparagraph1.F.3,afullrefundofany moneypaidforaworkorareplacementcopy,ifadefectinthe electronicworkisdiscoveredandreportedtoyouwithin90days ofreceiptofthework -Youcomplywithallothertermsofthisagreementforfree distributionofProjectGutenberg-tmworks 1.E.9 IfyouwishtochargeafeeordistributeaProjectGutenberg-tm electronicworkorgroupofworksondifferenttermsthanareset forthinthisagreement,youmustobtainpermissioninwritingfrom boththeProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationandMichael Hart,theowneroftheProjectGutenberg-tmtrademark Contactthe FoundationassetforthinSection3below 1.F 1.F.1 ProjectGutenbergvolunteersandemployeesexpendconsiderable efforttoidentify,docopyrightresearchon,transcribeandproofread publicdomainworksincreatingtheProjectGutenberg-tm collection Despitetheseefforts,ProjectGutenberg-tmelectronic works,andthemediumonwhichtheymaybestored,maycontain "Defects,"suchas,butnotlimitedto,incomplete,inaccurateor corruptdata,transcriptionerrors,acopyrightorotherintellectual propertyinfringement,adefectiveordamageddiskorothermedium,a computervirus,orcomputercodesthatdamageorcannotbereadby yourequipment 1.F.2 LIMITEDWARRANTY,DISCLAIMEROFDAMAGES-Exceptforthe"Right ofReplacementorRefund"describedinparagraph1.F.3,theProject GutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation,theowneroftheProject Gutenberg-tmtrademark,andanyotherpartydistributingaProject Gutenberg-tmelectronicworkunderthisagreement,disclaimall liabilitytoyoufordamages,costsandexpenses,includinglegal fees YOUAGREETHATYOUHAVENOREMEDIESFORNEGLIGENCE,STRICT LIABILITY,BREACHOFWARRANTYORBREACHOFCONTRACTEXCEPTTHOSE PROVIDEDINPARAGRAPHF3 YOUAGREETHATTHEFOUNDATION,THE TRADEMARKOWNER,ANDANYDISTRIBUTORUNDERTHISAGREEMENTWILLNOTBE LIABLETOYOUFORACTUAL,DIRECT,INDIRECT,CONSEQUENTIAL,PUNITIVEOR INCIDENTALDAMAGESEVENIFYOUGIVENOTICEOFTHEPOSSIBILITYOFSUCH DAMAGE 1.F.3 LIMITEDRIGHTOFREPLACEMENTORREFUND-Ifyoudiscovera defectinthiselectronicworkwithin90daysofreceivingit,youcan receivearefundofthemoney(ifany)youpaidforitbysendinga writtenexplanationtothepersonyoureceivedtheworkfrom Ifyou receivedtheworkonaphysicalmedium,youmustreturnthemediumwith yourwrittenexplanation Thepersonorentitythatprovidedyouwith thedefectiveworkmayelecttoprovideareplacementcopyinlieuofa refund Ifyoureceivedtheworkelectronically,thepersonorentity providingittoyoumaychoosetogiveyouasecondopportunityto receivetheworkelectronicallyinlieuofarefund Ifthesecondcopy isalsodefective,youmaydemandarefundinwritingwithoutfurther opportunitiestofixtheproblem 1.F.4 Exceptforthelimitedrightofreplacementorrefundsetforth inparagraph1.F.3,thisworkisprovidedtoyou'AS-IS'WITHNOOTHER WARRANTIESOFANYKIND,EXPRESSORIMPLIED,INCLUDINGBUTNOTLIMITEDTO WARRANTIESOFMERCHANTIBILITYORFITNESSFORANYPURPOSE 1.F.5 Somestatesdonotallowdisclaimersofcertainimplied warrantiesortheexclusionorlimitationofcertaintypesofdamages Ifanydisclaimerorlimitationsetforthinthisagreementviolatesthe lawofthestateapplicabletothisagreement,theagreementshallbe interpretedtomakethemaximumdisclaimerorlimitationpermittedby theapplicablestatelaw Theinvalidityorunenforceabilityofany provisionofthisagreementshallnotvoidtheremainingprovisions 1.F.6 INDEMNITY-YouagreetoindemnifyandholdtheFoundation,the trademarkowner,anyagentoremployeeoftheFoundation,anyone providingcopiesofProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworksinaccordance withthisagreement,andanyvolunteersassociatedwiththeproduction, promotionanddistributionofProjectGutenberg-tmelectronicworks, harmlessfromallliability,costsandexpenses,includinglegalfees, thatarisedirectlyorindirectlyfromanyofthefollowingwhichyoudo orcausetooccur:(a)distributionofthisoranyProjectGutenberg-tm work,(b)alteration,modification,oradditionsordeletionstoany ProjectGutenberg-tmwork,and(c)anyDefectyoucause Section InformationabouttheMissionofProjectGutenberg-tm ProjectGutenberg-tmissynonymouswiththefreedistributionof electronicworksinformatsreadablebythewidestvarietyofcomputers includingobsolete,old,middle-agedandnewcomputers Itexists becauseoftheeffortsofhundredsofvolunteersanddonationsfrom peopleinallwalksoflife Volunteersandfinancialsupporttoprovidevolunteerswiththe assistancetheyneed,iscriticaltoreachingProjectGutenberg-tm's goalsandensuringthattheProjectGutenberg-tmcollectionwill remainfreelyavailableforgenerationstocome In2001,theProject GutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationwascreatedtoprovideasecure andpermanentfutureforProjectGutenberg-tmandfuturegenerations TolearnmoreabouttheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundation andhowyoureffortsanddonationscanhelp,seeSections3and4 andtheFoundationwebpageathttp://www.pglaf.org Section3 InformationabouttheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchive Foundation TheProjectGutenbergLiteraryArchiveFoundationisanonprofit 501(c)(3)educationalcorporationorganizedunderthelawsofthe stateofMississippiandgrantedtaxexemptstatusbytheInternal RevenueService TheFoundation'sEINorfederaltaxidentification numberis64-6221541 Its501(c)(3)letterispostedat http://pglaf.org/fundraising ContributionstotheProjectGutenberg LiteraryArchiveFoundationaretaxdeductibletothefullextent permittedbyU.S federallawsandyourstate'slaws TheFoundation'sprincipalofficeislocatedat4557MelanDr S Fairbanks,AK,99712.,butitsvolunteersandemployeesarescattered throughoutnumerouslocations Itsbusinessofficeislocatedat 809North1500West,SaltLakeCity,UT84116,(801)596-1887,email business@pglaf.org Emailcontactlinksanduptodatecontact informationcanbefoundattheFoundation'swebsiteandofficial pageathttp://pglaf.org Foradditionalcontactinformation: Dr GregoryB Newby ChiefExecutiveandDirector gbnewby@pglaf.org Section4 InformationaboutDonationstotheProjectGutenberg LiteraryArchiveFoundation ProjectGutenberg-tmdependsuponandcannotsurvivewithoutwide spreadpublicsupportanddonationstocarryoutitsmissionof increasingthenumberofpublicdomainandlicensedworksthatcanbe freelydistributedinmachinereadableformaccessiblebythewidest arrayofequipmentincludingoutdatedequipment Manysmalldonations ($1to$5,000)areparticularlyimportanttomaintainingtaxexempt statuswiththeIRS TheFoundationiscommittedtocomplyingwiththelawsregulating charitiesandcharitabledonationsinall50statesoftheUnited States Compliancerequirementsarenotuniformandittakesa considerableeffort,muchpaperworkandmanyfeestomeetandkeepup withtheserequirements Wedonotsolicitdonationsinlocations wherewehavenotreceivedwrittenconfirmationofcompliance To SENDDONATIONSordeterminethestatusofcomplianceforany particularstatevisithttp://pglaf.org Whilewecannotanddonotsolicitcontributionsfromstateswherewe havenotmetthesolicitationrequirements,weknowofnoprohibition againstacceptingunsoliciteddonationsfromdonorsinsuchstateswho approachuswithofferstodonate Internationaldonationsaregratefullyaccepted,butwecannotmake anystatementsconcerningtaxtreatmentofdonationsreceivedfrom outsidetheUnitedStates U.S lawsaloneswampoursmallstaff PleasechecktheProjectGutenbergWebpagesforcurrentdonation methodsandaddresses Donationsareacceptedinanumberofother waysincludingchecks,onlinepaymentsandcreditcarddonations Todonate,pleasevisit:http://pglaf.org/donate Section5 GeneralInformationAboutProjectGutenberg-tmelectronic works ProfessorMichaelS HartistheoriginatoroftheProjectGutenberg-tm conceptofalibraryofelectronicworksthatcouldbefreelyshared withanyone Forthirtyyears,heproducedanddistributedProject Gutenberg-tmeBookswithonlyaloosenetworkofvolunteersupport ProjectGutenberg-tmeBooksareoftencreatedfromseveralprinted editions,allofwhichareconfirmedasPublicDomainintheU.S unlessacopyrightnoticeisincluded Thus,wedonotnecessarily keepeBooksincompliancewithanyparticularpaperedition MostpeoplestartatourWebsitewhichhasthemainPGsearchfacility: http://www.gutenberg.org ThisWebsiteincludesinformationaboutProjectGutenberg-tm, includinghowtomakedonationstotheProjectGutenbergLiterary ArchiveFoundation,howtohelpproduceourneweBooks,andhowto subscribetoouremailnewslettertohearaboutneweBooks ... TRANSLATORS'PREFACE THE STORY OF THE VOLSUNGS ANDNIBLUNGS CHAPTERI Of Sigi, the Son of Odin CHAPTERII Of the Birth of Volsung, the Son of Rerir, who was the Son of Sigi CHAPTERIII Of the SwordthatSigmund,Volsung'sson,drew... CHAPTERXIII Of the Birth and Waxing of Sigurd Fafnir'sbane CHAPTERXIV Regin's tale of his Brothers, and of the Gold calledAndvari'sHoard CHAPTERXV Of the Welding together of the Shards of the SwordGram... FRAGMENTS OF THE LAY OF BRYNHILD THE SECONDORANCIENTLAY OF GUDRUN THE SONG OF ATLI THE WHETTING OF GUDRUN THE LAY OF HAMDIR THE LAMENT OF ODDRUN INTRODUCTION ItwouldseemfittingforaNorthernfolk,deriving the greaterandbetterpart
- Xem thêm -

Xem thêm: The story of the volsungs , The story of the volsungs

Mục lục

Xem thêm

Gợi ý tài liệu liên quan cho bạn