The fortunes of the farrells

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TheProjectGutenbergEBookofTheFortunesoftheFarrells,by Mrs GeorgedeHorneVaizey ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:TheFortunesoftheFarrells Author:Mrs GeorgedeHorneVaizey ReleaseDate:April17,2007[EBook#21120] Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHEFORTUNESOFTHEFARRELLS*** ProducedbyNickHodsonofLondon,England MrsGeorgedeHorneVaizey "TheFortunesoftheFarrells" ChapterOne FromPretencetoReality “Berengaria,whatdoyougenerallydowithyouroldcourttrains?Howdo youusethemup?” Thefirehaddieddowntoadullredglow;onlyonetinyflameremained, which, flickering to and fro, showed a wide expanse of floor, and two easy-chairs drawn up before the fender, on which reclined vague, femininefigures Thevoicewhichhadaskedthequestionwasslowand languid, and breathed a wearied indifference to the world in general, whichwasmorethanequalledinthetoneofthereply— “Really, don’t you know, I can’t say! I put them away, meaning to use them for cloaks or evening-dresses; but I forget, or they get mislaid, or themaidconfiscatesthemforherownpurposes Iexpect,asamatterof fact,shemakesthemupintoSundayblouses.” “You spoil that woman, dear! You are so absurdly easy-going that she robsyourightandleft Dotakemyadvice,andgivehernoticeatonce!” “I couldn’t, darling, even to please you! It bores me so to deal with strangers,andnooneelsecoulddomyhairlikeElsie Ifitpleasesherto use up a few of my garments, why shouldn’t the poor soul have her pleasure like the rest? That reminds me, Lucille—are you going to the duchess’s ball to-night? I suppose it is superfluous to ask, since no entertainmentiscompletewithoutyounowadays.” “Oh, I suppose so! If I am not too fagged, that is to say But I have a dinnerfirst,andtwoAt-homes,andpeoplemakesuchafussifyoudon’t put in an appearance One hardly feels up to dancing after struggling through two of the asphyxiating mobs dignified by the name of entertainments; still, I promised Arthur the cotillion, and he will be desolated if I play him false; and I have a new frock for the occasion which is really rather a dream Silver tissue over satin, and shoulderstrapsofdiamonds Ihadthemresetonpurpose Ispendquiteafortune onresettingjewelsnowadays;butonemustbeoriginal,ordie!” “Mydear,youwillbetoobewitching!LordArthurwillbemoredesperate thanever Mypoorlittleselfwillbenowherebesideyou!I’mgoingtobe sweetandsimpleinchiffonandpearls Paquinmadethegown Don’task what it cost! I tore up the bill and threw it in the fire Really, don’t you know,itmademequitedepressed!Soperishable,too!IexpectIshallbe in rags before the evening is over But it’s quite sweet at present—all frilly-willys from top to toe I love to be fluffy and feminine, and my pearls really are unique! The princess examined them quite carefully whenImetherlastwinter,andsaidshehadrarelyseenfinerspecimens I wouldn’t wear them at all unless they were good I cannot endure inferiorjewels!” Thespeakerlolledstillmoreluxuriouslyinherchair,thenstartedforward, as the door opened with a bang, and a harsh voice accosted her by name— “MissMollie,yourmotherwantstoknowifyouhavefinisheddarningthe socks? She is putting away the clean clothes, and wants to sort them withtherest.” TheLadyLucille—otherwiseMollieFarrell,thepennilessdaughterofan impoverishedhouse—jumpedupfromherchair,andclaspedherhands in dismay In blissful contemplation of imagining chiffons and cotillions, the prosaic duties of reality had slipped from her mind, and recollection broughtwithitapangofremorse “Misery me! I forgot the very existence of the wretched things! Never mind Tell mother, Annie, that I’ll set to work this minute, and put them awaymyselfassoonastheyaredone TellherI’msorry;tellherI’llbeas quickasIpossiblycan!” Annie stood for a moment in eloquent silence then shut the door and descendedthestairs;whileMolliegropedherwayacrosstheroom,and Berengarialiftedherselffromherchairwithasigh,andslippedherhand alongthemantelpiece “I’lllightthegas Howhorriditis,beingdraggedbacktoearthbythese sordid interruptions! It’s always the way—as soon as I begin to forget myself,andenjoyatasteofluxury,backI’mdraggedtothesamedullold life Ireallysawthatsilvertissue,andfeltthecoldnessofthediamonds against my shoulder; and then—socks! Those wretched, thick, ugly socks, with the heels all out, and the toes in rags! I think schoolboys ought to be obliged to darn their own clothes, just to teach them a little care!” “Well,beaisy;youhaven’ttodarnthem,anyway It’smywork,whichis the best of reasons why it is left undone Hurry with the gas, there’s a dear There’snotimeforconundrums,ifIamtofinishto-night!” Another sigh, the striking of a match, and the light sprang up, and showed a tall, girlish figure, clad in a blue serge skirt, and a flannel blouse, faded from repeated washing, and showing signs of a decided shortageofmaterial Considered as a costume, it was a painful contrast to the silver and diamonds of the fair Berengaria; but the shabby garments looked their best on Ruth Farrell’s slight form, and the face reflected in the strip of mirrorabovethemantelpiecehadadistinctcharmofitsown Alowbrow belowmassesofbrownhair;aflushofcarmineonthecheeks;softlips, drooping pathetically at the corners; and—most striking feature of all— thicklymarkedeyebrowsofalmostjettyblack,stretchinginlong,straight lines above the grey eyes A pretty, almost a beautiful face, full of character,fullofthought,fullofarestless,unsatisfiedyearning She threw the burnt-out match on to the fire, and turned to survey the room—surely the most motley and curious apartment that could be imagined! The sloping roof proved at a glance the position under the leads,andapeepattheoutsideofthedoorwouldhaveshowntheword “Attica”paintedinboldwhitelettersonthetoppanel Attica—or the land of attic—constituted the boudoirs of the Ladies Berengaria and Lucille, the work-rooms and play-rooms, dens and havensofrefuge,ofRuthandMollieFarrell,andtheiryoungstepsisters, Trix and Betty Connor; for it was of generous proportions, measuring a square eight yards or more, and the floor was divided into four equal sectionsbylinesofwhitepaintagainstthebrownoftheoriginalstaining Eachsisterheldanexclusiverighttoherowndomain,andforanotherto enter therein without special invitation was held as an outrage against decencyandgoodtaste In the beginning of things, Ruth, as the eldest, had claimed the right of first choice, and, being a young woman who liked her comforts, had instantlyandunhesitatinglyappropriatedthefireside Mollie,comingnextinorder,plumpedforthewindow,itbeinghersunny habit to look forward to an endless summer; Trix, grumbling vigorously, appropriatedtheanglemadebytheblankwallsnearestthefire;andpoor Betty made her lair in the direct draught of the doorway, and enjoyed a permanentcoldintheheadfromNovembertoMarch Aglanceatthefourcornersoftheroomaffordedaveryfairideaofthe charactersofitsinhabitants Ruth’s“Fireland”domainhadanairofluxury of its own, though the draperies were of simple turkey-red, and the pictures mounted on home-made frames of brown paper There was a rowofshelvesagainstthewall,holdingquiteagoodlyshowofvolumes, rangedneatlysidebyside,whileacurtainedrecessatoneendcontained tea-cupsandcanister,andasmallmetalkettle,asscrupulouslybrightas onthedaywhenithadlefttheshop An old folding-chair had been painted green, and supplied with frilled cushions Therewasasensiblelittletable,holdingahand-machine,and a work-basket—yawning apart, it is true, but neatly strapped to prevent accident; and on the mantelpiece a crowd of photographs, and a few oddmentsofbluechina,allcarefullydustedbytheowner’shand,andset outwithartisticeffect Last, and crowning luxury of all, a screen stood behind the low chair, manufacturedoutofaclothes-horseflouncedwithturkey-red,whichwas at once the comfort and distraction of Ruth’s soul; for while, from her pointofview,itwasanindispensablecomfort,shuttingoutdraughtsfrom windowanddoor,andgivingtoherlittlenookthelastblessingofprivacy, Trix denounced the innovation as the incarnation of selfishness, Betty’s teethchatteredwithanoiselikecastanets,andMolliepeeredroundthe corner with her shoulders huddled in a shawl, and her face at once so cheerful, so unreproving, and so bleached with cold, that it was not in humannaturetorefusethedesiredinvitation Mollie’s domain of “Bellevue” comprised the square-shaped window, on the sill of which she cultivated nasturtiums and mignonette in summer, andintheembrasurestoodawindow-seatcoveredwithbluecloth,that wasreallytheremainsofanoldwinterskirt Visitors to “Bellevue” always paused to admire the sprays of flowers which were embroidered here and there on this blue background; and thenMollie“dissembled,”asshecalledit,smilingsweetrecognitionofthe praise, but never once breathing the secret that the whole being and intentoftheseflowerswastohidethejoinsbeneath She also possessed a table and a work-basket; but the former was decidedly ancient and insecure as to legs, while the basket made no pretence of shutting, but looked on unabashed while its contents lay scatteredovertherug A dressmaker’s stand stood in the corner, on which a blouse, more or lesscomplete,wasinvariablypinned,waitingforthemomentwhenMollie had time to devote to her favourite occupation There were no bookshelves,butalitterofmagazinesbehindacushiononthewindow-seat, andinnumerablephotographsweresecuredtothewallbyblack-headed pins,tofadeslowlybutsurelyintounrecognitionintheunbrokenglareof light Mollieherselfpinedforcurtainstomitigatethedraughtduringthewinter months, but the three other inmates of Attica loudly declared that they could not spare a fraction of light, so she gave way smiling, as her customwas Mollienevergrumbled;itwassodull,asshesaid,andshe loved to be gay An invincible cheeriness of heart carried her gallantly over the quicksands in which Ruth was submerged by reason of her moodiness, and Trix by her quick temper, and made it a physical impossibilitytorepineovertheinevitable Fifteen-year-old Trix was in that stage when the Oxford examination seems the end-all and be-all of existence Her section of Attica was proudlydubbed“TheStudy,”andhaditswallscoveredwithmaps,class lists,and“memos”ofgreatvariety Thedeskwasstrewnwithpapersand exercise-books, and there lingered in the air that indescribable scent of sponge, slate, indiarubber, and freshly sharpened pencils which seem inseparablefromyouthfulstudy Trixconfessedtooneweakness,—onlyone!—anoverwhelminggreedfor pencil-boxes and sharpeners, and the contents of the wooden shelf abovethedesktestifiedtoherindulgenceinthiscraving “Thegirlsgave themtome!”sheusedtosaywhenstrangersexclaimedatthenumberof the piled-up boxes, but she blushed even as she spoke, knowing well that to keep sixpence in her pocket and pass a pencil-box of a new design,wasafeatofself-denialbeyondimagination Dear,chubby,placidBettywasonlythirteen,andcaredfornothinginthe world but her relations, chocolate-creams, and scrambling through the day’s classes with as little exertion as possible She shivered in her corner, poor mite, sucking audibly, to the distraction of her elders, the while she skimmed over her lessons, and looked forward to the time whenshewouldbefreetodevoteherselftothehobbyofthehour Sometimesitwaspostcards;sometimesitwasstamps;sometimesitwas pennytoyscollectedfromstreetvendors Ithadoncesoaredashighas autographs,andapromisingbeginningofthreesignatureswerealready pasted into the remaining leaves of an exercise-book Whatever the collection might be, it lived in heaps on the uncarpeted floor; and when Bettyhadatidyfit,wascoveredwithacrochetantimacassarwhichhad knownbetterdays,andhadgrowndecidedlymellowintint Onthisparticularafternoon,thetwoyoungersistersweretakingteawith school friends, while their elders enjoyed an uninterrupted tête-à-tête, whentheycouldindulgeinafavouritegame Whenlifewasunusuallyflat andprosaic,whentheweatherwaswet,invitationsconspicuousbytheir absence, and the want of pocket-money particularly poignant, Mollie wouldcryardently:“Let’sbeBerengariaandLucille!”and,presto!thetwo girlsweretransplantedtoanotherworld—aworldwiththemagicletterW addedtoitsaddress,whereemptypursesanddyeddressesexistednot, andallwasjoy,jewellery,andjunketing Lucillehadlatelybecomethebrideofamillionaireandadoringduke;the peerless Berengaria wrought havoc with the peace of Lord Arthur, and had more suitors than she could count on the fingers of both hands It wasafascinatingmake-believe;but,asRuthplaintivelyremarked,itdid comewithsomewhatofashocktobedraggedbacktoearthby—socks! She stood leaning against the mantelpiece, looking on with frowning browswhilehersistercollectedtogetherscatteredmaterials,andcarried themandtheyawningbasketbacktothecosycornerinFireland,where, forthehour,shewasaninvitedguest “Quick’sthewordandsharp’stheaction!”criedMolliecheerily “Nowfora grand old cobble; and if there are any heels out to-day, my fine young gentlemen,don’tblameme if you have to tread on knots for the rest of the week! It’s the strangest thing on earth that I can remember nice thingsyearafteryearwithoutaneffort,andyetforgetthishorridmending everySaturdayasregularlyasthedaycomesround.” “Carelessness!” replied Ruth shortly, and with the candour of near relations “Icouldn’tforgetifItried FirstthingwhenIwakeinthemorning IthinkofallthebothersomedutiesIhavetodointheday,andthelast thingatnightIamthinkingofthemstill Butyouaresofrivolous,Mollie!” “Andyouaresomorbid,mydear!Youdon’toffertohelpme,Iobserve; andsinceyouaresoconscientiousasallthat,Ishouldthinkyoumight lend me a hand in my extremity There! I’ll give you Ransome’s for a treat; he breaks out at the toes, but his heels are intact It’s playwork mendingforhimcomparedwiththeotherboys.” Shetossedacollectionofbrownwoollenstockingsintohersister’slap, andRuthtookthemup,frowningheavilywithherblackbrows,butnever dreamingofrefusingtherequest,thoughherownshareofthehousehold mendinghadkeptheremployedduringtheearlierpartoftheafternoon, whileMolliewasamusingherselfelsewhere Shetookadarning-eggout of her basket, threaded a needle daintily, and set to work in the painstakingmannerwhichcharacterisedallherefforts;butshesighedas sheworked,andMolliesang,andthatwasthedifferencebetweenthem brave-hearted;sosheresolutelyblinkedawaytherisingtears,and,rising toherfeet,lightedthecrimson-shadedlamponthewriting-table Itsrosy lighthadawonderfullybeautifyingeffectonthelittleroom,givinganairof luxury to the commonplace furnishings; and when the curtains were drawn, and the easy-chair drawn up to the fire, it was as bright and cheerfulalittleinteriorasoneneedwishtosee Mollie looked round with a glance of satisfaction, then suddenly rushed intothehallatthesoundofaloudknockatthedoor Sosoon!Shehad not expected the next delivery for another half-hour at least No letter appearedinthebox;so,withwildvisionsofalegalmissive,registeredfor greatersafety,shethrewopenthedoorandpeeredoutintothenight A man’s tall figure stood on the step; but it was not the figure of a postman Mollie leant forward—the light from above shining on cheeks flushedfromcontactwiththefire,andruffledgoldenhead—leantforward, andstaredintohisfacewithincredulouseyes “Mollie!” cried a well-remembered voice, which broke into an eloquent tremoroverthename “You!”criedMollie!“MrMelland!Itcan’tbe!Whatdoesitmean?Youcan’t reallybehere!” He laughed at that, and took a step forward, like the masterful Jack of old “Iamhere;itismyself,andnobodyelse!I’lltellyouallaboutitifyouwill letmein It’srathercoldto-night,youknow.” Sheheldthedoorwideopenatthat,andhurriedhimacrossthehallinto the little, pink-lighted room, which she had just prepared for another’s reception There they stood face to face, staring at each other for a breathlessmoment “IthoughtyouwereinRaby—” “SoIwasyesterday Ileftthismorning,andcamedownbythefirsttrain.” “Mrs Thornton promised to write I thought you were the postman just now;and,ofcourse,onecannothelpbeingcurious.—Haveyoucometo tellusanythingnice?DidUncleBernardrememberusatall?” “He has left your sister his wife’s rubies They are very beautiful, I am told,andofconsiderablevalue.” “Oh,Iamglad!Ruthwillbepleased;andshewillbeabletowearthem whensheismarried Howbeautifulshewilllook!And—andme?” Jackshookhishead “Nothing?Notevenawordtosayheforgavemeforcomingaway?” “There is a letter You will see it later on What I meant was that your namewasnotmentionedinthewill Heleftyounolegacy.” Mollie sat down in the easy-chair, and leant her head against the cushions Inspiteofallthathadpassed,inspiteofeverydeterminationto be prepared for the worst, the blow fell with crushing weight She was conscious of a feeling of physical weakness, as if the body shared with the mind in grieving over the vanished dream; but she tried bravely to smileandlookunconcerned “ThenIsupposehe—VictorDruce—inheritsall?” Jacklookedatherwithanxiouseyes “You expected it, didn’t you? You are not surprised? It seems to have beengenerallytakenforgrantedforthelastsixmonths.” “Yes; so Mrs Thornton said If it had been anyone else I should not grudgeitsomuch Andyouareleftouttoo!Iwish—oh,Iwishithadbeen different!” JackMellandtookastepforward,andbentoverherchair “Mollie,”hesaidsoftly,“shallweconsoleeachother?Ihavebeenwaiting until this question was settled before coming to see you It seemed an endlesstimetowait,butIcouldn’tcometillIknewthetruth Howcoulda poor fellow, with a few beggarly hundreds a year, approach a girl who mightbeoneofthebiggestheiressesinthekingdom?ButIdidn’tforget you—Icouldn’tforget Ihavebeenthinkingofyounightandday Itwas allthehardertobesilentwhenyouwereintrouble;butitwasthestraight thing to You can’t tell what it means to me to see you again! When you opened the door just now, and the lamp-light showed me your little goldenhead—” Hebrokeoff,withthesamestrangequiverinhisvoicewhichhadmarked hisfirstutteranceofhername;butMollieshrankbackstillfurtherinher chair,staringathimwithtroubledeyes “Whatdoyoumean?Idon’tunderstand!” “It’s simple enough—only that I love you, and want you to love me in return!” “But—don’t you remember?—you told me about her—the girl you met, and loved at first sight Suppose you met her again, and felt the same; thenyouwouldbesorryifI—” “Oh,Mollie,doyoumeantosayyouhaverememberedallthistime,and never guessed! It was yourself, darling; there never was anyone else! I thinkImusthavecaredforyoufromthefirst,thoughIdidnotrealiseit, forIwasirritatedthatIcouldnevergetyoutobeserious Youwerelikea child out for a holiday—full of fun and mischief—and I wanted to talk of deeperthings Thenonedayforamomentyoushowedmeaglimpseof yourrealself—thesweet,womanlyheartthatlaybeneaththegaiety;and as I looked at your face I recognised it, Mollie It was something I had dreamed of when I did not know I was dreaming, and wanted, without knowingwhatIwanted!IsawthatlookagainfiveminutesafterIhadtold youofmylostlove,asyoulookedatmeandwishedmehappiness Why didyoulooksad,Mollie?Wereyou—wereyousorryatall?” Mollie put her hand to her side with a gesture as natural as it was charming “Ithurt,”shesaidsimply “Inever,neverdreamtthatyoumeantme,andI have tried hard not to think of you ever since; but I didn’t succeed very well WhydidyoualwayswritetoRuthinsteadoftome?” Jack laughed happily, and with a lover’s privilege seated himself on the armoftheeasy-chair,andtookMollie’shandsinhis “Because, as I told you before, you darling, I was waiting And you reallythinkyoucouldmakeupyourmindtomarrymeonnexttonothing, and live in a tiny house, and wrestle with the household bills? Do you thinkIamworththesacrifice?” Molliesmiledathim,shylyconfident “I’m so improvident that I’m afraid I’d marry you on nothing I haven’t a copperofmyown,remember Youwillhaveapennilessbride Oh,Iwish morethaneverthatUncleBernardhadleftmesomething,sothatImight help you! It does seem hard, doesn’t it, that Victor Druce should get it all?” Jackhesitatedamoment,tuggingathismoustachewithhisunoccupied hand “Ididn’tsaythat,youknow Inevertoldyouthathedid.” “Jack!” The name slipped out so naturally on the surprise of the moment that there was a prolonged interval in the conversation, while Jack acknowledged the compliment Then Mollie returned to the attack, laughingandrosy “You asked if I were surprised You said everyone had taken it for granted!” “Exactly; so I did But for once everyone was mistaken Druce has not comeinfortheproperty.” “Then,who—who—” “Someone equally unworthy—an ungracious rascal of a fellow called Melland Itisallmine,Mollie—allthatthereistoleave!” AndthenJackdidaprettything—athingthathewouldhavesneeredat as high-flown and sentimental a few months before; but no man really knowshimselforhiscapabilitiestillhelovesandisbeloved Heslipped offhisseat,andkneltontheflooratMollie’sfeet “AndIhavecometoyou,”hesaidgravely,“toaskyoutoshareitwithme, for it’s worth nothing, and worse than nothing, if I have not you by my side!” He held out his hand as he spoke, and Mollie laid hers in it, while her faceconfrontedhim,whiteandtensewithexcitement “Ican’t—Ican’tbelieveit!”shegasped “Itistoowonderful!Youandme! Thatlovely,lovelyplace;andwethemastersofit,abletodoaswelike— just as we like, all the summer days, and the winter days, and the beautifulspring,andnomoreanxietyandtrouble!Jack—Jack!” Herheadwentdownonhisshoulder,andheheldherfastwhilesheshed afewnaturaltearsofjoyandthankfulness “Mypoorgirl—mydeargirl!Yes,itisallover,andthemoneyisasmuch yoursasmine IfeelsureMrFarrellmeantittobeso,andthatyouwill findsomethingtothateffectinthisletterhehasleftyou Hediscovered my secret before I left Raby, and said plainly how much he wished it success There,darling,readyourletter!Ihopeyoumayfindsomekind wordstocomfortyourheart.” Molliebrokeopentheenvelope,whichhehandedtoher Itwasasolemn business, reading a message from the dead, and her big eyes looked quiteawestruckastheyscannedthepage Therewereonlyafewwords, writteninasmall,tremuloushand:— “MydearMollie,—Ileaveyounothing,hopingthatyoumayshareall Thatismystrongwish,andIbelieveIamhelpingonyourhappiness by an apparent neglect Try to forgive me for refusing your last request Itwouldhavebeeneasiertoconsent,butIconsideredthat ashortperiodofanxietywouldbeablessingindisguise,ifitshowed youwhowereyourtruefriends Ifamancomesforwardandoffers youhisloveinthedaysofobscurityandpoverty,thatman’sloveis worthhaving Ihopeandbelieveitwillcometoyou Ithankyoufor your kindness to an old man Forgive him for all his offences, foremost among them an unfounded suspicion.—Your friend and kinsman,BernardFarrell.” “There!YouseehowrightIwas?”criedJackintriumph “Ineffect,weare jointheirs,andhaveequallyfreehandsinthedisposalofthemoney You must settle an income on your mother which will ensure her against anxiety,andthenyoucancomeawaywithaneasymind,andhelpmeto turnintoacountrysquireandlearnmydutiestothetenants Youtoldme oncethathewouldbehard-workedifhewereconscientious,andIwant todothethingwellwhileIamaboutit ThisisDecember Imeantobe marriedinJanuary,atlatest!” Mollie laughed, but with a somewhat tremulous sound The change of scene which had taken place within the last quarter of an hour was so complete,soextraordinary,thatshefeltdazedbytheshock Notonlyhad undreamed-ofhappinesscometoherself,butwithitsuchreliefandease forallbelongingtoher,thattheywouldrejoiceequallywithherself Itdid indeedseemmorelikeadreamthanareality,as,withJack’sarmround her waist and her head resting contentedly upon Jack’s shoulder, they driftedoffintooneofthosedelightfulconversationswhichfollowallhappy betrothals “Doyouremember?”queriedJack “Doyouremember?”echoedMollie “Whatdidyoumeanwhenyousaid?” “Howdidyoufeelwhenyouheard?” “Whendidyoufirstbegin?” “Andareyouquitesureyouwillnever,never—”Itisallasoldasthehills, and as new as to-morrow morning, though each separate pair of lovers imagineintheirinnocencethattheyowntheexclusivemonopoly “Jack!” cried Mollie at last, sitting suddenly upright and clasping her handsinamaze “Jack,imagineit!AllthistimeIhaveforgottenthemost thrillingpartofall Thecondition—themysteriouscondition!Whatwasit? Whatdidyoudo,orleaveundone,whichmadeyoudifferentfromtherest ofus?” ChapterThirtyEight Conclusion “Aha!” cried Jack “I wondered when you were coming to that! It was indeedsomethingofwhichwecouldneverhavethought!MrFarrellhad learnt by sad experience that real happiness cannot be purchased by money,sohaddeterminedtoleavehisfortunetotheonewhocaredforit least—thatistosay,totheonewhoputotherthingsfirst—love—wholehearted, disinterested love, such as he himself had felt for his beautiful wife;andhonestwork,enjoyedforitsownsakemorethanforwhatitwill bring! Ruth was out of the running from the start, for she showed so plainly that, to her, money meant happiness There must have been a time when he wavered in favour of Druce, who played his part remarkably well; but on the whole, it was my obstinate, ungracious self whichapproachednearesttohisideal HeknewthatIlovedyou,butthat I should never venture to ask you to be my wife if you were a great heiress; so as he himself writes, he left you nothing, hoping that you would share all I want you literally to realise that, darling—and to feel thatthemoneybelongsasmuchtoyouastome!” Molliesmiledathiminhersunny,candidfashion “Oh,Ishall!”shesaidsimply “Imeanto TherearesomanythingsthatI want to for the dear people here, and they would like them better if they came from me Uncle Bernard was a dear, sweet old thing to scheme for our happiness, and I adore him for it I certainly put love before money, for I would marry you if we had to play an organ in the streetsorsingsentimentaldittiesoutoftune,butitwillbelikeafairytale toliveintheCourt—withyou!” “Itwill,indeed!Idon’tfeelindifferenttofortuneanylongernowthatithas brought us together When the Will was read aloud yesterday, I did not knowwhetherIwasstandingonmyheadormyheels Irusheddownto the vicarage, and good little Mrs Thornton cried upon my neck, literally shedid,Mollie!” Molliesmiledathimwithlove-liteyes “Butoh,Jack,there’ssomethingelse—Victor?Whatabouthim?Washe terriblydisappointed?Didhegetnothing?” “No!notacent!” “DidUncleBernardleavenowordofexplanationorgood-bye?” “Therewasnonote,buttherewasanenvelopeandan—anenclosure,” saidJackgravely He put his hand in his waistcoat-pocket and drew from his pocket-book anunmountedphotograph “DruceopenedthisinthelibraryaftertheWillwasread,staredatitfora moment,thenthrewitinthefire,anddashedoutoftheroom Itfellonthe grateandthelawyerpickeditupandgaveittome.” Heheldoutthephotographashespoke,andMolliebenteagerlyoverit It was Ruth’s missing picture of the library at the Court—one of the longtime exposures which she had taken on the eventful morning when the desk had been opened in the squire’s absence The nearer part of the interior was clear and distinct, but the further half was blurred as if something had moved while the plate was still exposed, while leaning over the open desk was a man’s figure, dim and blurred indeed, but recognisableinaflashasthatofVictorDruce! Mollie’sfacewaswhitetothelipsassheraisedittomeetJack’sglance, andheputhisarmroundherprotectingly “Yes; I knew you would be shocked! It is easy to see what happened AfterDrucewentout,ostensiblyfortheday,heslunkbackunseen,and entered the library by the window The blur across the picture shows in which direction he crossed to the desk Meantime, Ruth had put her camerainposition,andastheexposurewouldbealongoneinsucha darkroom,shehadgoneawayandleftitthere Drucewouldnevernotice the little camera perched on a side-table, and when he heard Ruth returninghe,nodoubt,hidhimselfhastilybehindthecurtains;buthehad remainedsufficientlylongatthedesktogiveadefiniteimpressionofhis figure Thecamerawasdiscoveredafteryouleft,andthesquirehadthe plates developed in the village He must have had the curiosity to examinethembeforesendingthemon,andonecanimaginehisfeelings uponfindingthesolutionofthemysterywhichhadtroubledhimsomuch I have no sympathy for Mr Victor Druce; I am only profoundly thankful that Ruth escaped his clutches Don’t let us talk of him any more We wantonlypleasantsubjectsonthisgreatnight,sweetheart!” “And there are so many pleasant subjects to think of It will be such a lovelyexperiencetoplayfairygodmothertopeoplewhohavehadabad time;thefirstofallcomesthedearpater There’shiskeyinthelatch!Be nicetohim,Jack;hehasbeensogoodtous!” “Come, then!” said Jack, rising, and holding out his hand towards her “Letusgotomeethimtogether,andyoushalltellhimthathehasanew son,andthatallhistroublesareatanend?” TheEnd |Chapter1||Chapter2||Chapter3||Chapter4||Chapter5||Chapter6||Chapter7|| Chapter8||Chapter9||Chapter10||Chapter11||Chapter12||Chapter13||Chapter 14||Chapter15||Chapter16||Chapter17||Chapter18||Chapter19||Chapter20|| Chapter21||Chapter22||Chapter23||Chapter24||Chapter25||Chapter26||Chapter 27||Chapter28||Chapter29||Chapter30||Chapter31||Chapter32||Chapter33|| Chapter34||Chapter35||Chapter36||Chapter37||Chapter38| EndoftheProjectGutenbergEBookofTheFortunesoftheFarrells,by Mrs GeorgedeHorneVaizey ***ENDOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHEFORTUNESOFTHEFARRELLS*** *****Thisfileshouldbenamed21120-h.htmor21120-h.zip***** 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Language:English ***START OF THISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOK THE FORTUNES OF THE FARRELLS *** ProducedbyNickHodson of London,England MrsGeorgedeHorneVaizey "The Fortunes of the Farrells" ChapterOne... pile of books, which she droppedupon the tablewithabang,whichmade the otheroccupants of the roomstartintheirseats,andfor the nexthour the twogirlswrestled with the difficulties of. .. Molliepursedherlipsdisapprovingly “I’d miss them horribly They are naughty, of course, and noisy and tiresome,andmakenoend of work,butthat’s the nature of boys;on the other hand, they are full of fun and good-humour,
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