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TheProjectGutenbergEBookofASimpleStory,byMrs Inchbald ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:ASimpleStory Author:Mrs Inchbald Editor:G L Strachey ReleaseDate:July5,2007[EBook#22002] Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKASIMPLESTORY*** ProducedbyDavidEdwards,MarciaBrooks,andtheOnlineDistributed ProofreadingTeamathttp://www.pgdp.net(Thisfilewasproduced fromimagesgenerouslymadeavailablebyTheInternetArchive/American Libraries.) ASIMPLESTORY BY MRS INCHBALD WITHANINTRODUCTIONBY G L STRACHEY LONDON HENRYFROWDE 1908 OXFORD:HORACEHART PRINTERTOTHEUNIVERSITY Transcriber'sNote:TableofContentsAdded LeftArchaicspellings,butmademinorchangestopunctuation CONTENTS INTRODUCTION PREFACE VOLUMEI CHAPTERI CHAPTERII CHAPTERIII CHAPTERIV CHAPTERV CHAPTERVI CHAPTERVII CHAPTERVIII CHAPTERIX CHAPTERX CHAPTERXI CHAPTERXII CHAPTERXIII CHAPTERXIV CHAPTERXV CHAPTERXVI CHAPTERXVII VOLUMEII CHAPTERI CHAPTERII CHAPTERIII CHAPTERIV CHAPTERV CHAPTERVI CHAPTERVII CHAPTERVIII CHAPTERIX CHAPTERX CHAPTERXI CHAPTERXII VOLUMEIII CHAPTERI CHAPTERII CHAPTERIII CHAPTERIV CHAPTERV CHAPTERVI CHAPTERVII CHAPTERVIII CHAPTERIX CHAPTERX CHAPTERXI CHAPTERXII CHAPTERXIII CHAPTERXIV VOLUMEIV CHAPTERI CHAPTERII CHAPTERIII CHAPTERIV CHAPTERV CHAPTERVI CHAPTERVII CHAPTERVIII CHAPTERIX CHAPTERX CHAPTERXI CHAPTERXII PlayswrittenbyMrs Inchbald INTRODUCTION ASimpleStoryisoneofthosebookswhich,forsomereasonorother,have failedtocomedowntous,astheydeserved,alongthecurrentoftime,buthave driftedintoaliterarybackwaterwhereonlytheprofessionalcriticorthecurious discoverer can find them out "The iniquity of oblivion blindly scattereth her poppy;"andnowheremoreblindlythanintherepublicofletters Ifwewereto inquirehowithashappenedthatthetruevalueofMrs Inchbald'sachievement haspassedoutofgeneralrecognition,perhapstheanswertoourquestionwould be found to lie in the extreme difficulty with which the mass of readers detect andappreciatemerequalityinliterature Theirjudgmentisswayedbyahundred side-considerations which have nothing to with art, but happen easily to impresstheimagination,ortofitinwiththefashionofthehour Thereputation ofMrs Inchbald'scontemporary,FannyBurney,isacaseinpoint Everyonehas heard of Fanny Burney's novels, and Evelina is still widely read Yet it is impossibletodoubtthat,sofarasqualityaloneisconcerned,Evelinadeservesto be ranked considerably below A Simple Story But its writer was the familiar friendofthegreatestspiritsofherage;shewastheauthorofoneofthebestof diaries; and her work was immediately and immensely popular Thus it has happenedthatthenameofFannyBurneyhasmaintaineditsplaceupontheroll ofEnglishnovelists,whilethatofMrs Inchbaldisforgotten ButtheobscurityofMrs Inchbald'scareerhasnot,ofcourse,beentheonly reasonforthe neglect ofherwork Themeritsof ASimpleStoryareofakind peculiarlycalculatedtoescapethenoticeofagenerationofreadersbroughtup on the fiction of the nineteenth century That fiction, infinitely various as it is, possesses at least one characteristic common to the whole of it—a breadth of outlookuponlife,whichcanbeparalleledbynootherbodyofliteratureinthe worldsavethatoftheElizabethans Butthecomprehensivenessofviewshared by Dickens and Tolstoy, by Balzac and George Eliot, finds no place in Mrs Inchbald's work Compared with A Simple Story even the narrow canvases of JaneAustenseemspaciouspicturesofdiversifiedlife Mrs Inchbald'snovelis notconcernedwiththeworldatlarge,orwithanysectionofsociety,hardlyeven with the family; its subject is a group of two or three individuals whose interactionformsthewholebusinessofthebook Thereisnolocalcolourinit, no complexity of detail nor violence of contrast; the atmosphere is vague and neutral,theactionpassesamongill-definedsitting-rooms,andthemostpoignant sceneinthestorytakesplaceuponastaircasewhichhasneverbeendescribed Thus the reader of modern novels is inevitably struck, in ASimple Story, by a sense of emptiness and thinness, which may well blind him to high intrinsic merits Thespiritoftheeighteenthcenturyiscertainlypresentinthebook,butit is the eighteenth century of France rather than of England Mrs Inchbald no doubtowedmuchtoRichardson;herviewoflifeistheindoorsentimentalview ofthegreatauthorofClarissa;buthertreatmentofithasverylittleincommon withhismethodofmicroscopicanalysisandvastaccumulation Ifshebelongsto any school, it is among the followers of the French classical tradition that she mustbeplaced ASimpleStoryis,initssmallway,adescendantoftheTragedies ofRacine;andMissMilnermayclaimrelationshipwithMadamedeClèves Besideshernarrownessofvision,Mrs Inchbaldpossessesanotherquality,no less characteristic of her French predecessors, and no less rare among the novelists of England She is essentially a stylist—a writer whose whole conceptionofherartisdominatedbystylisticintention Herstyle,itistrue,ison thewholepoor;itisoftenheavyandpompous,sometimesclumsyandindistinct; compared with the style of such a master as Thackeray it sinks at once into insignificance Butthe interest ofherstyledoes not liein its intrinsicmeritso much as in the use to which she puts it Thackeray's style is mere ornament, existingindependentlyofwhathehastosay;Mrs Inchbald'sispartandparcel ofhermatter Theresultisthatwhen,inmomentsofinspiration,sherisestothe height of her opportunity, when, mastering her material, she invests her expression with the whole intensity of her feeling and her thought, then she achieveseffectsoftherarestbeauty—effectsofakindforwhichonemaysearch throughThackerayinvain Themosttriumphantofthesepassagesisthescene on the staircase of Elmwood House—a passage which would be spoilt by quotation and which no one who has ever read it could forget But the same qualityistobefoundthroughoutherwork "Oh,MissWoodley!"exclaimsMiss Milner,forcedatlasttoconfesstoherfriendwhatshefeelstowardsDorriforth, "I love him with all the passion of a mistress, and with all the tenderness of a wife."Noyounglady,evenintheeighteenthcentury,evergaveutterancetosuch asentenceasthat Itisthesentence,notofaspeaker,butofawriter;andyet,for thatveryreason,itisdelightful,andcomestouschargedwithacurioussenseof emotion,whichisnonethelessrealforitselaboration InNatureandArt,Mrs Inchbald's second novel, the climax of the story is told in a series of short paragraphs, which, for bitterness and concentration of style, are almost reminiscentofStendhal: Thejuryconsultedforafewminutes Theverdictwas"Guilty" Shehearditwithcomposure ButwhenWilliamplacedthefatalvelvetonhisheadandrosetopronounce sentence, she started with a kind of convulsive motion, retreated a step or two back,and,liftingupherhandswithascream,exclaimed— "Oh,notfromyou!" The piercing shriek which accompanied these words prevented their being heardbypartoftheaudience;andthosewhoheardthemthoughtlittleoftheir meaning,morethanthattheyexpressedherfearofdying Serene and dignified, as if no such exclamation had been uttered, William deliveredthefatalspeech,endingwith"Dead,dead,dead" She fainted as he closed the period, and was carried back to prison in a swoon;whileheadjournedthecourttogotodinner Here,nodoubt,thereisatouchofmelodrama;butitisthemelodramaofa rhetorician,and,inthatfine"Shehearditwithcomposure",geniushasbrushed aside the forced and the obvious, to express, with supreme directness, the anguishofasoul For,inspiteofMrs Inchbald'sartificialities,inspiteofherlackofthatkind ofrealisticdescriptionwhichseemstomodernreaderstheverybloodandbreath of a good story, she has the power of doing what, after all, only a very few indeedofherfellowcraftsmenhaveeverbeenabletodo—shecanbringintoher pagesthelivingpressureofahumanpassion,shecaninvest,ifnotwithrealism, withsomethinggreaterthanrealism—withthesenseofrealityitself—thepains, thetriumphs,andtheagitationsofthehumanheart "Theheart,"tousetheoldfashioned phrase—there is Mrs Inchbald's empire, there is the sphere of her gloryandhercommand Outsideofit,herpowersareweakandfluctuating She hasnofirmgraspofthemasculineelementsincharacter:shewishestodrawa rough man, Sandford, and she draws a rude one; she tries her hand at a hero, Rushbrook, and she turns out a prig Her humour is not faulty, but it is exceedingly slight What an immortal figure the dim Mrs Horton would have becomeinthe handsofJaneAusten!In NatureandArt, her attempts at social satire are superficial and overstrained But weaknesses of this kind—and it wouldbeeasytoprolongthelist—arewhateveryreaderofthefollowingpages willnoticewithoutdifficulty,andwhatnowiseonewillregard "Ilnefautpoint juger des hommes par ce qu'ils ignorent, mais par ce qu'ils savent;" and Mrs Inchbald'sknowledgewasasprofoundasitwaslimited HerMissMilnerisan originalandbrilliantcreation,compactofcharmandlife Sheisaflirt,andaflirt not only adorable, but worthy of adoration Did Mrs Inchbald take the suggestionofaheroinewithimperfectionsfromthelittlemasterpiecewhich,on moresidesthanone,closelytouchesher's—ManonLescaut?Perhaps;andyet,if thiswasso,theborrowingwasoftheslightest,foritisonlyinthefactthatsheis imperfectthatMissMilnerbearstoManonanyresemblanceatall Ineveryother respect, the English heroine is the precise contrary of the French one: she is a creatureoffierywill,ofhighbearing,ofnobledisposition;andhershortcomings areborn,notofweakness,butofexcessofstrength Mrs Inchbaldhastakenthis character, she has thrown it under the influence of a violent and absorbing passion, and, upon that theme, she has written her delicate, sympathetic, and artificialbook As one reads it, one cannot but feel that it is, if not directly and circumstantially, at least in essence, autobiographical One finds oneself speculatingovertheauthor,wonderingwhatwasherhistory,andhowmuchofit wasMissMilner's Unfortunatelythegreaterpartofwhatweshouldmostliketo know of Mrs Inchbald's life has vanished beyond recovery She wrote her Memoirs, and she burnt them; and who can tell whether even there we should havefoundaself-revelation?Confessionsaresometimescuriouslydiscreet,and, inthecaseofMrs Inchbald,wemaybesurethatitisonlywhatwasindiscreet thatwouldreallybeworththehearing Yetherlifeisnotdevoidofinterest A briefsketchofitmaybewelcometoherreaders ElizabethInchbaldwasbornonthe15thofOctober,1753,atStandingfield, nearBurySt EdmundsinSuffolk;[1]oneofthenumerousoffspringofJohnand Mary Simpson The Simpsons, who were Roman Catholics, held a moderate farm in Standingfield, and ranked among the gentry of the neighbourhood In Elizabeth'seighthyear,herfatherdied;butthefamilycontinuedatthefarm,the elderdaughtersmarryingandsettlinginLondon,whileElizabethgrewupintoa beautiful and charming girl One misfortune, however, interfered with her happiness—a defect of utterance which during her early years rendered her speech so indistinct as to be unintelligible to strangers She devoted herself to reading and to dreams of the great world At thirteen, she declared she would ratherdiethanlivelongerwithoutseeingtheworld;shelongedtogotoLondon; shelongedtogouponthestage When,in1770,oneofherbrothersbecamean them "Come," said he, "this kiss is a token you have nothing to fear." And he kissed her affectionately "I shall send for Miss Woodley too immediately," continuedhe "Oh!Ishallbeoverjoyedtoseeher,myLord—andtoseeMr Sandford—and evenMr Rushbrook." "Doyouknowhim?"saidLordElmwood "Yes,"shereplied,"Ihaveseenhimtwoorthreetimes." TheEarlhopingtheairmightbeameansofre-establishingherstrengthand spirits, now left the room, and ordered his carriage to be prepared: while she arose,attendedbyoneofhisfemaleservants,forwhomhehadsenttotown,to bringsuchchangesofapparelaswererequisite WhenMatildawasreadytojoinherfatherinthenextroom,shefeltatremor seize her, that made it almost impossible to appear before him No other circumstance now impending to agitate her heart, she felt more forcibly its embarrassmentatmeetingontermsofeasyintercourse,him,ofwhomshehad never been used to think, but with that distant reverence and fear, which his severityhadexcited;andsheknewnothowsheshoulddaretospeakto,orlook onhim,withthatfreedomheraffectionwarranted After several efforts to conquer these nice and refined sensations, but to no purpose,sheatlastwenttohisapartment Hewasreading;butassheentered,he putouthishandanddrewhertohim Hertearswhollyovercameher Hecould have intermingled his—but assuming a grave countenance, he commanded her to desist from exhausting her spirits; and, after a few powerful struggles, she obeyed Beforethemorningwasover,sheexperiencedtheextremejoyofsittingby herfather'ssideastheydrovetotown,andofreceiving,duringhisconversation, athousandproofsofhislove,andtokensofherlastinghappiness ItwasnowthemiddleofNovember;andyet,asMatildapassedalong,never to her, did the sun shine so bright as upon this morning—never did her imagination comprehend, that the human heart could feel happiness true and genuineashers! On arriving at the house, there was no abatement of her felicity: all was respect and duty on the part of the domestics—all paternal care on the part of Lord Elmwood; and she would have been at that summit of her wishes which annihilates hope, but that the prospect of seeing Miss Woodley and Mr Sandford,stillkeptthispassioninexistence CHAPTERXII Top RushbrookwasdetainedatElmwoodHouseduringallthistime,morefrom thepersuasions,nayprayers,ofSandford,thanthecommandsofLordElmwood Hehad,butforSandford,followedhisuncle,andexposedhimselftohisanger, soonerthanhaveenduredthemostpiercinginquietude,whichhewasdoomedto suffer,tillthenewsarrivedofLadyMatilda'ssafety Heindeedhadlittleelseto fearfromtheknownfirm,courageouscharacterofherfather,andtheexpedition withwhichheundertookhisjourney;butlovers'fearsarelikethoseofwomen, obstinate, and no argument could persuade either him or Miss Woodley (who hadnowventuredtocometoElmwoodHouse)butthatMatilda'speaceofmind mightbeforeverdestroyed,beforeshewassetatliberty ThesummonsfromLordElmwoodfortheircomingtotown,wasreceivedby eachofthispartywithdelight;buttheimpatiencetoobeyit,wasinRushbrook so violent, it was painful to himself, and extremely troublesome to Sandford; who wished, from his regard to Lady Matilda, rather to delay, than hurry their journey "You are to blame," said he to him and Miss Woodley, "to wish by your arrival,todividewithLordElmwoodthattenderbond,whichtiesthegoodwho conferobligations,totheobjectoftheirbenevolence Atpresentthereisnoone withhimtoshareinthecareandprotectionofhisdaughter,andheisunderthe necessityofdischargingthatdutyhimself;thishabitmaybecomesopowerful, thathecannotthrowitoff,evenifhisformerresolutionsshouldurgehimtoit While we remain here, therefore, Lady Matilda is safe with her father; but it would not surprise me, if on our arrival (especially if we are precipitate) he shouldplaceheragainwithMissWoodleyatadistance." To this forcible conjecture, they submitted for a few days, and then most gladlysetoutfortown Ontheirarrival,theyweremet,evenatthestreet-door,byLadyMatilda;and with an expression of joy, they did not suppose her features could have worn SheembracedMissWoodley!hunguponSandford!andtoMr Rushbrook,who fromhisconsciousloveonlybowedatanhumbledistance,sheheldoutherhand witheverylookandgestureofthetenderestesteem When Lord Elmwood joined them, he welcomed them all sincerely; but Sandfordthemost,withwhomhehadnotspokenformanydaysbeforeheleft the country, for his allusion to the wretched situation of his daughter.—And Sandford (with his fellow-travellers) now saw him treat that daughter with an easy, a natural fondness, as if she had lived with him from her infancy He appeared,however,attimes,undertheapprehension,thatthepropensityofman tojealousy,mightgiveRushbrookapangatthisdangerousrivalinhisloveand fortune—for though Lord Elmwood remembered well the hazard he had once ventured to befriend Matilda, yet the present unlimited reconciliation was something so unlooked for, it might be a trial too much for his generosity, to remain wholly disinterested on the event Slight as was this suspicion, it did Rushbrookinjustice HelovedLadyMatildatoosincerely,helovedherfather's happiness, and her mother's memory too faithfully, not to be rejoiced at all he witnessed;norcouldthesecrethopethatwhisperedhim,"Theirblessingsmight onedaybemutual,"increasethepleasurehefound,inbeholdingMatildahappy Unexpected affairs, in which Lord Elmwood had been for some time engaged,haddivertedhisattentionforawhilefromthemarriageofhisnephew; nordidheatthistimefindhisdispositionsufficientlysevere,toexactfromthe young man a compliance with his wishes, at so cruel an alternative as that of being for ever discarded He felt his mind, by the late incident, too much softenedforsuchharshness;heyetwishedforthealliancehehadproposed;for he was more consistent in his character than to suffer the tenderness his daughter's peril had awakened, to derange those plans which he had long projected Neverevennow,foramomentdidheindulge—forperhapsitwould havebeenanindulgence—theideaofreplacingherexactlyintherightsofher birth,tothedisappointmentofallhisnephew'sexpectations Yet,milderatthiscrisisinhistemperthanhehadbeenforyearsbefore,and knowinghecouldbenolongerirritateduponthesubjectofhisdaughter,heonce moreresolvedtotrusthimselfinaconferencewithRushbrookonthesubjectof marriage; meaning at the same time to mention Matilda as an opponent from whomhehadnothingtofear ButforsometimebeforeRushbrookwascalledto thisprivateaudience,hehad,byhisunweariedattention,endeavouredtoimpress uponMatilda'smind,thesoftestsentimentsinhisfavour Hesucceeded—butnot ashewished Shelovedhimasherfriend,hercousin,herfoster-brother,butnot as a lover The idea of love never once came to her thoughts; and she would sport with Rushbrook like the most harmless child, while he, all impassioned, couldwithdifficultyresisttellingher,whatshemadehimsuffer AtthemeetingbetweenhimandLordElmwood,towhichhewascalledfor his final answer on that subject which had once nearly proved so fatal to him; afterathousandfears,muchconfusionandembarrassment,heatlengthfrankly confessed his "Heart was engaged, and had been so, long before his uncle offeredtodirecthischoice." LordElmwooddesiredtoknow,"Onwhomhehadplacedhisaffections." "I dare not tell you, my Lord," returned he, infinitely confused; "but Mr Sandfordcanwitnesstheirsincerityandhowlongtheyhavebeenfixed." "Fixed!"criedtheEarl "Immoveablyfixed,myLord;andyettheobjectisasunconsciousofmylove tothismoment,asyouyourselfhavebeen;andIswearevershallbeso,without yourpermission." "Nametheobject,"saidLordElmwood,anxiously "MyLord,Idarenot.—ThelasttimeInamedhertoyou,youthreatenedto abandonmeformyarrogance." LordElmwoodstarted.——"Mydaughter!Wouldyoumarryher?" "Butwithyourapprobation,myLord;andthat——" Beforehecouldproceedawordfurther,hisunclelefttheroomhastily—and leftRushbrookallterrorforhisapproachingfate Lord Elmwood went immediately into the apartment where Sandford, Miss Woodley,andMatilda,weresitting,andcriedwithanangryvoice,andwithhis countenancedisordered, "Rushbrook has offended me beyond forgiveness.—Go, Sandford, to the library,whereheis,andtellhimthisinstanttoquitmyhouse,andneverdareto return." MissWoodleyliftedupherhandsandsighed Sandfordroseslowlyfromhisseattoexecutetheoffice While Lady Matilda, who was arranging her music books upon the instrument, stopped from her employment suddenly, with her face bathed in tears Ageneralsilenceensued,tillLordElmwood,resuminghisangrytone,cried, "Didyouhearme,Mr Sandford?" Sandfordnow,withoutawordinreply,madeforthedoor—butthereMatilda impededhim,andthrowingherarmsabouthisneck,cried, "DearMr Sandford,donot." "How!"exclaimedherfather She saw the impending frown, and rushing towards him, took his hand fearfully, and knelt at his feet "Mr Rushbrook is my relation," she cried in a patheticvoice,"mycompanion,myfriend—beforeyoulovedmehewasanxious formyhappiness,andoftenvisitedmetolamentwith,andconsoleme Icannot seehimturnedoutofyourhousewithoutfeelingforhim,whatheoncefeltfor me." LordElmwoodturnedasidetoconcealhissensations—thenraisingherfrom thefloor,hesaid,"Doyouknowwhathehasaskedofme?" "No,"answeredsheintheutmostignorance,andwiththeutmostinnocence paintedonherface;"butwhateveritis,myLord,thoughyoudonotgrantit,yet pardonhimforasking." "Perhapsyouwouldgranthimwhathehasrequested?"saidherfather "Mostwillingly—wasitinmygift." "Itis,"repliedhe "Gotohiminthelibrary,andhearwhathehastosay;for onyourwillhisfateshalldepend." Like lightning she flew out of the room; while even the grave Sandford smiledattheideaoftheirmeeting Rushbrook,withhisfearsallverifiedbythemannerinwhichhisunclehad lefthim,satwithhisheadreclinedagainstabookcase,andeverylimbextended withthedespairthathadseizedhim Matilda nimbly opened the door and cried, "Mr Rushbrook, I am come to comfortyou." "Thatyouhavealwaysdone,"saidhe,risinginrapturetoreceiveher,evenin themidstofallhissadness "Whatisityouwant?"saidshe "Whathaveyouaskedofmyfatherthathe hasdeniedyou?" "Ihaveaskedforthat,"repliedhe,"whichisdearertomethanmylife." "Besatisfiedthen,"returnedshe,"foryoushallhaveit." "DearMatilda!itisnotinyourpowertobestow." "Buthehastoldmeitshallbeinmypower;andhasdesiredmetogive,orto refuseityou,atmyownpleasure." "OHeavens!"criedRushbrookintransport,"Hashe?" "Hehasindeed—beforeMr SandfordandMissWoodley Nowtellmewhat youpetitionedfor?" "Iaskedhim,"criedRushbrook,trembling,"forawife." Herhand,whichhadjustthentakenholdofhis,inthewarmthofherwishto serve him, now dropped down as with the stroke of death—her face lost its colour—andsheleanedagainstthedeskbywhichtheywere standing,without utteringaword "Whatmeansthischange?"saidhe;"Doyounotwishmehappy?" "Yes," she exclaimed: "Heaven is my witness But it gives me concern to thinkwemustpart." "Thenletusbejoined,"criedhe,fallingatherfeet,"tilldeathalonecanpart us." All the sensibility—the reserve—the pride, with which she was so amply possessed, returned to her that moment She started and cried, "Could Lord Elmwoodknowforwhathesentme?" "Hedid,"repliedRushbrook—"Iboldlytoldhimofmypresumptuouslove, andhehasgiventoyoualone,thepowerovermyhappinessormisery Oh!do notdoommetothelatter." Whethertheheart ofMatilda,suchasithas beendescribed,couldsentence himtomisery,thereaderislefttosurmise—andifhesupposesthatitcouldnot, hehaseveryreasontosupposethattheirweddedlife,was—alifeofhappiness Hehasbeheldtheperniciouseffectsofanimpropereducationinthedestiny which attended the unthinking Miss Milner.—On the opposite side, what may not be hoped from that school of prudence—though of adversity—in which Matildawasbred? AndMr Milner,Matilda'sgrandfather,hadbetterhavegivenhisfortunetoa distantbranchof hisfamily—asMatilda'sfatheroncemeanttodo—sothat he hadgiventohisdaughter APROPEREDUCATION Top PLAYSwrittenbyMRS INCHBALD,andpublished byG G andJ ROBINSON,PaternosterRow LOVER'SVOWS; APlayinfiveActs,fromtheGermanof KOTZEBUE WIVESASTHEYWERE,ANDMAIDS ASTHEYARE E V E RY O N E H A S H I S FA U LT I ' L L T E L L Y O U W H AT, ComediesinfiveActs SUCHTHINGSARE, APlayinfiveActs THEMARRIEDMAN, AComedy,Price1s 6d each T H E C H I L D O F N AT U R E APPEARANCEISAGAINSTTHEM T H E W I D O W ' S V O W THEMIDNIGHTHOUR, AComedy T H E W E D D I N G D AY, PriceOneShillingeach N AT U R E A N D A RT, TheSecondEdition,inTwoVolumes,Price 7s sewed Top EndoftheProjectGutenbergEBookofASimpleStory,byMrs Inchbald ***ENDOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKASIMPLESTORY*** *****Thisfileshouldbenamed22002-h.htmor22002-h.zip***** Thisandallassociatedfilesofvariousformatswillbefoundin: http://www.gutenberg.net/2/2/0/0/22002/ ProducedbyDavidEdwards,MarciaBrooksandtheOnlineDistributed ProofreadingTeamathttp://www.pgdp.net(Thisfilewasproduced fromimagesgenerouslymadeavailablebyTheInternetArchive/American Libraries.) 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herlivelyeleganceanddignifiedsimplicity,theygazedather,andateachother alternately,withastonishment!—andMrs Horton,asshesatattheheadofher tea-table,feltherselfbutas a menialservant:suchcommandhasbeautyifunited... 1797 Afteranalterationinmyteeth,andthedeathofDr Warren—yetfarfromunhappy 1798 Happy,butforsuspicionamountingalmosttocertaintyof a rapidappearanceofageinmyface 1802 AfterfeelingwhollyindifferentaboutDr... the French classical tradition that she mustbeplaced A Simple Story is,initssmallway, a descendantoftheTragedies ofRacine;andMissMilnermayclaimrelationshipwithMadamedeClèves
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