The marble faun vol 2

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ProjectGutenberg'sTheMarbleFaun,VolumeII.,byNathanielHawthorne ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:TheMarbleFaun,VolumeII TheRomanceofMonteBeni Author:NathanielHawthorne ReleaseDate:February25,2006[EBook#2182] LastUpdated:December15,2016 Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHEMARBLEFAUN,VOLUMEII *** ProducedbyMichaelPullenandDavidWidger THEMARBLEFAUN, orTheRomanceofMonteBeni BYNATHANIELHAWTHORNE VolumeII InTwoVolumes Contents THEMARBLEFAUN,VOLUMEII CHAPTERXXIV THETOWERAMONGTHEAPENNINES CHAPTERXXV SUNSHINE CHAPTERXXVI THEPEDIGREEOFMONTEBENI CHAPTERXXVII MYTHS CHAPTERXXVIII THEOWLTOWER CHAPTERXXIX ONTHEBATTLEMENTS CHAPTERXXX DONATELLO’SBUST CHAPTERXXXI THEMARBLESALOON CHAPTERXXXII SCENESBYTHEWAY CHAPTERXXXIII PICTUREDWINDOWS CHAPTERXXXIV MARKET-DAYINPERUGIA CHAPTERXXXV THEBRONZEPONTIFF’SBENEDICTION CHAPTERXXXVI HILDA’STOWER CHAPTERXXXVII THEEMPTINESSOFPICTUREGALLERIES CHAPTERXXXVIII ALTARSANDINCENSE CHAPTERXXXIX THEWORLD’SCATHEDRAL CHAPTERXL HILDAANDAFRIEND CHAPTERXLI SNOWDROPSANDMAIDENLYDELIGHTS CHAPTERXLII REMINISCENCESOFMIRIAM CHAPTERXLIII THEEXTINCTIONOFALAMP CHAPTERXLIV THEDESERTEDSHRINE CHAPTERXLV THEFLIGHTOFHILDA’SDOVES CHAPTERXLVI AWALKONTHECAMPAGNA CHAPTERXLVII THEPEASANTANDCONTADINA CHAPTERXLVIII ASCENEINTHECORSO CHAPTERXLIX AFROLICOFTHECARNIVAL CHAPTERL MIRIAM,HILDA,KENYON,DONATELLO CONCLUSION THEMARBLEFAUN VolumeII CHAPTERXXIV THETOWERAMONGTHEAPENNINES ItwasinJunethatthesculptor,Kenyon,arrivedonhorsebackatthegateofan ancientcountryhouse(which,fromsomeofitsfeatures,mightalmostbecalled acastle)situatedinapartofTuscanysomewhatremotefromtheordinarytrack of tourists Thither we must now accompany him, and endeavor to make our storyflowonward,likeastreamlet,pastagraytowerthatrisesonthehillside, overlooking a spacious valley, which is set in the grand framework of the Apennines ThesculptorhadleftRomewiththeretreatingtideofforeignresidents For,as summerapproaches,theNiobeofNationsismadetobewailanew,anddoubtless with sincerity, the loss of that large part of her population which she derives fromotherlands,andonwhomdependsmuchofwhateverremnantofprosperity she still enjoys Rome, at this season, is pervaded and overhung with atmospheric terrors, and insulated within a charmed and deadly circle The crowdofwanderingtouristsbetakethemselvestoSwitzerland,totheRhine,or, from this central home of the world, to their native homes in England or America,whichtheyareaptthenceforwardtolookuponasprovincial,afteronce havingyieldedtothespelloftheEternalCity Theartist,whocontemplatesan indefinitesuccessionofwintersinthishomeofart(thoughhisfirstthoughtwas merely toimprovehimselfby abriefvisit),goesforth,inthesummertime,to sketch scenery and costume among the Tuscan hills, and pour, if he can, the purple air of Italy over his canvas He studies the old schools of art in the mountaintownswheretheywereborn,andwheretheyarestilltobeseeninthe fadedfrescosofGiottoandCimabue,onthewallsofmanyachurch,orinthe darkchapels,inwhichthesacristandrawsasidetheveilfromatreasuredpicture ofPerugino Thence,thehappypaintergoestowalkthelong,brightgalleriesof Florence,ortostealglowingcolorsfromthemiraculousworks,whichhefinds inascoreofVenetianpalaces Suchsummersasthese,spentamidwhateveris exquisite in art, or wild and picturesque in nature, may not inadequately repay him for the chill neglect and disappointment through which he has probably languished,inhisRomanwinter Thissunny,shadowy,breezy,wanderinglife,in which he seeks for beauty as his treasure, and gathers for his winter’s honey what is but a passing fragrance to all other men, is worth living for, come afterwardswhatmay Evenifhedieunrecognized,theartisthashadhisshareof enjoymentandsuccess Kenyonhadseen,atadistanceofmanymiles,theoldvillaorcastletowards whichhisjourneylay,lookingfromitsheightoverabroadexpanseofvalley As he drew nearer, however, it had been hidden among the inequalities of the hillside, until the winding road brought him almost to the iron gateway The sculptorfoundthissubstantialbarrierfastenedwithlockandbolt Therewasno bell,norotherinstrumentofsound;and,aftersummoningtheinvisiblegarrison withhisvoice,insteadofatrumpet,hehadleisuretotakeaglanceattheexterior ofthefortress Aboutthirtyyardswithinthegatewayroseasquaretower,loftyenoughtobe averyprominentobjectinthelandscape,andmorethansufficientlymassivein proportion to its height Its antiquity was evidently such that, in a climate of more abundant moisture,the ivywouldhave mantleditfromhead tofoot in a garmentthatmight, bythistime,havebeencenturiesold, thoughevernew In the dry Italian air, however, Nature had only so far adopted this old pile of stonework as to cover almost every hand’s-breadth of it with close-clinging lichens and yellow moss; and the immemorial growth of these kindly productionsrenderedthegeneralhueofthetowersoftandvenerable,andtook awaytheaspectofnakednesswhichwouldhavemadeitsagedrearierthannow Up and down the height of the tower were scattered three or four windows, the lower ones grated with iron bars, the upper ones vacant both of window frames and glass Besides these larger openings, there were several loopholes andlittle square apertures, which mightbesupposed to lightthestaircase,that doubtless climbed the interior towards the battlemented and machicolated summit Withthislast-mentionedwarlikegarnitureuponitssternoldheadand brow, the tower seemed evidently a stronghold of times long past Many a crossbowmanhadshothisshaftsfromthosewindowsandloop-holes,andfrom thevantageheightofthosegraybattlements;manyaflightofarrows,too,had hit all round about the embrasures above, or the apertures below, where the helmetofadefenderhadmomentarilyglimmered Onfestalnights,moreover,a hundredlampshadoftengleamedafaroverthevalley,suspendedfromtheiron hooks that were ranged for the purpose beneath the battlements and every window Connectedwiththetower,andextendingbehindit,thereseemedtobeavery spacious residence, chiefly of more modern date It perhaps owed much of its fresherappearance,however,toacoatofstuccoandyellowwash,whichisasort of renovation very much in vogue with the Italians Kenyon noticed over a doorway,intheportionoftheedificeimmediatelyadjacenttothetower,across, which, with a bell suspended above the roof, indicated that this was a consecratedprecinct,andthechapelofthemansion Meanwhile, the hot sun so incommoded the unsheltered traveller, that he shouted forth another impatient summons Happening, at the same moment, to lookupward,hesawafigureleaningfromanembrasureofthebattlements,and gazingdownathim “Ho, Signore Count!” cried the sculptor, waving his straw hat, for he recognized the face, after a moment’s doubt “This is a warm reception, truly! Praybidyourporterletmein,beforethesunshrivelsmequiteintoacinder.” “Iwillcomemyself,”respondedDonatello,flingingdownhisvoiceoutofthe clouds,asitwere;“oldTomasoandoldStellaarebothasleep,nodoubt,andthe rest of the people are in the vineyard But I have expected you, and you are welcome!” The young Count—as perhaps we had better designate him in his ancestral tower—vanished from the battlements; and Kenyon saw his figure appear successivelyateachofthewindows,ashedescended On everyreappearance, heturnedhisfacetowardsthesculptorandgaveanodandsmile;forakindly impulsepromptedhimthustoassurehisvisitorofawelcome,afterkeepinghim solongataninhospitablethreshold Kenyon, however (naturally and professionally expert at reading the expressionofthehumancountenance),hadavaguesensethatthiswasnotthe young friend whom he had known so familiarly in Rome; not the sylvan and untutored youth, whom Miriam, Hilda, and himself had liked, laughed at, and sported with; not the Donatello whose identity they had so playfully mixed up withthatoftheFaunofPraxiteles Finally, when his host had emerged from a side portal of the mansion, and approachedthegateway,thetravellerstillfeltthattherewassomethinglost,or something gained (he hardly knew which), that set the Donatello of to-day irreconcilablyatoddswithhimofyesterday Hisverygaitshowedit,inacertain gravity, a weight and measure of step, that had nothing in common with the irregular buoyancy which used to distinguish him His face was paler and thinner,andthelipslessfullandlessapart “I have looked for you a long while,” said Donatello; and, though his voice soundeddifferently,andcutoutitswordsmoresharplythanhadbeenitswont, still there was a smile shining on his face, that, for the moment, quite brought backtheFaun “Ishallbemorecheerful,perhaps,nowthatyouhavecome Itis CHAPTERL MIRIAM,HILDA,KENYON,DONATELLO The gentle reader, we trust, would not thank us for one of those minute elucidations,whicharesotedious,and,afterall,sounsatisfactory,inclearingup theromanticmysteriesofastory Heistoowisetoinsistuponlookingcloselyat thewrongsideofthetapestry,aftertherightonehasbeensufficientlydisplayed tohim,wovenwiththebestoftheartist’sskill,andcunninglyarrangedwitha viewtotheharmoniousexhibitionofitscolors Ifanybrilliant,orbeautiful,or even tolerable effect have been produced, this pattern of kindly readers will accept it at its worth, without tearing its web apart, with the idle purpose of discoveringhowthethreadshavebeenknittogether;forthesagacitybywhich he is distinguished will long ago have taught him that any narrative of human action and adventure whether we call it history or romance—is certain to be a fragilehandiwork,moreeasilyrentthanmended Theactualexperienceofeven the most ordinary life is full of events that never explain themselves, either as regardstheiroriginortheirtendency Itwouldbeeasy,fromconversationswhichwehaveheldwiththesculptor,to suggestaclewtothemysteryofHilda’sdisappearance;although,aslongasshe remained in Italy, there was a remarkable reserve in her communications upon this subject, even to her most intimate friends Either a pledge of secrecy had beenexacted,oraprudentialmotivewarnedhernottorevealthestratagemsofa religiousbody,orthesecretactsofadespoticgovernment—whichevermightbe responsible in the present instance—while still within the scope of their jurisdiction Possibly,shemightnotherselfbefullyawarewhatpowerhadlaid its grasp upon her person What has chiefly perplexed us, however, among Hilda’sadventures,isthemodeofherrelease,inwhichsomeinscrutabletyranny orotherseemedtotakepartinthefrolicoftheCarnival Wecanonlyaccount for it, by supposing that the fitful and fantastic imagination of a woman— sportive,becauseshemustotherwisebedesperate—hadarrangedthisincident, andmadeittheconditionofastepwhichherconscience,ortheconscienceof another,requiredhertotake A few days after Hilda’s reappearance, she and the sculptor were straying togetherthroughthestreetsofRome Beingdeepintalk,itsohappenedthatthey foundthemselvesnearthemajestic,pillaredportico,andhuge,blackrotundityof thePantheon Itstandsalmostatthecentralpointofthelabyrinthineintricacies ofthemoderncity,andoftenpresentsitselfbeforethebewilderedstranger,when he is in search of other objects Hilda, looking up, proposed that they should enter “Ineverpassitwithoutgoingin,”shesaid,“topaymyhomageatthetombof Raphael.” “NorI,”saidKenyon,“withoutstoppingtoadmirethenoblestedificewhich thebarbarismoftheearlyages,andthemorebarbarouspontiffsandprincesof laterones,havesparedtous.” They went in accordingly, and stood in the free space of that great circle, around which are ranged the arched recesses and stately altars, formerly dedicated to heathengods, butChristianized through twelve centuriesgoneby TheworldhasnothingelselikethePantheon Sogranditis,thatthepasteboard statues over the lofty cornice not disturb the effect, any more than the tin crownsandhearts,thedustyartificialflowers,andallmanneroftrumperygewgaws, hanging at the saintly shrines The rust and dinginess that have dimmed thepreciousmarbleonthewalls;thepavement,withitsgreatsquaresandrounds ofporphyryandgranite,crackedcrosswiseandinahundreddirections,showing how roughly the troublesome ages have trampled here; the gray dome above, withitsopeningtothesky,asifheavenwerelookingdownintotheinteriorof thisplaceofworship,leftunimpededforprayerstoascendthemorefreely;all these things make an impression of solemnity, which St Peter’s itself fails to produce “Ithink,”saidthesculptor,“itistotheapertureinthedome—thatgreatEye, gazingheavenwardthatthePantheonowesthepeculiarity ofitseffect Itisso heathenish, as it were,—so unlike all the snugness of our modern civilization! Look,too,atthepavement,directlybeneaththeopenspace!Somuchrainhas fallenthere,inthelasttwothousandyears,thatitisgreenwithsmall,finemoss, suchasgrowsovertombstonesinadampEnglishchurchyard.” “I like better,” replied Hilda, “to look at the bright, blue sky, roofing the edificewherethebuildersleftitopen Itisverydelightful,inabreezyday,tosee the masses of white cloud float over the opening, and then the sunshine fall throughitagain,fitfully,asitdoesnow Woulditbeanywonderifwewereto seeangelshoveringthere,partlyinandpartlyout,withgenial,heavenlyfaces, notinterceptingthelight,butonlytransmutingitintobeautifulcolors?Lookat that broad, golden beam—a sloping cataract of sunlight—which comes down fromtheapertureandrestsupontheshrine,attherighthandoftheentrance!” “There is a dusky picture over that altar,” observed the sculptor “Let us go andseeifthisstrongilluminationbringsoutanymeritinit.” Approaching the shrine, they found the picture little worth looking at, but couldnotforbearsmiling,toseethataveryplumpandcomfortabletabby-cat— whom we ourselves have often observed haunting the Pantheon—had established herself on the altar, in the genial sunbeam, and was fast asleep amongtheholytapers Theirfootstepsdisturbingher,sheawoke,raisedherself, andsatblinkinginthesun,yetwithacertaindignityandself-possession,asif consciousofrepresentingasaint “Ipresume,”remarkedKenyon,“thatthisisthefirstofthefelineracethathas eversetherselfupasanobjectofworship,inthePantheonorelsewhere,since thedaysofancientEgypt See;thereisapeasantfromtheneighboringmarket, actuallykneelingtoher!Sheseemsagraciousandbenignantsaintenough.” “Donotmakemelaugh,”saidHildareproachfully,“buthelpmetodrivethe creature away It distresses me to see that poor man, or any human being, directinghisprayerssomuchamiss.” “Then, Hilda,” answered the sculptor more seriously, “the only Place in the Pantheon for you and me to kneel is on the pavement beneath the central aperture Ifweprayatasaint’sshrine,weshallgiveutterancetoearthlywishes; butifweprayfacetofacewiththeDeity,weshallfeelitimpioustopetitionfor aughtthatisnarrowandselfish MethinksitisthisthatmakestheCatholicsso delightintheworshipofsaints;theycanbringupalltheirlittleworldlywants and whims, their individualities and human weaknesses, not as things to be repentedof,buttobehumoredbythecanonizedhumanitytowhichtheypray Indeed,itisverytempting!” WhatHildamighthaveansweredmustbelefttoconjecture;forassheturned from the shrine, her eyes were attracted to the figure of a female penitent, kneeling on the pavement just beneath the great central eye, in the very spot which Kenyon had designated as the only one whence prayers should ascend Theupturnedfacewasinvisible,behindaveilormask,whichformedapartof thegarb “Itcannotbe!”whisperedHilda,withemotion “No;itcannotbe!” “Whatdisturbsyou?”askedKenyon “Whydoyoutrembleso?” “If it were possible,” she replied, “I should fancy that kneeling figure to be Miriam!” “Asyousay,itisimpossible,”rejoinedthesculptor;“Weknowtoowellwhat has befallen both her and Donatello.” “Yes; it is impossible!” repeated Hilda Hervoicewasstilltremulous,however,andsheseemedunabletowithdrawher attention from the kneeling figure Suddenly, and as if the idea of Miriam had openedthewholevolumeofHilda’sreminiscences,sheputthisquestiontothe sculptor:“WasDonatelloreallyaFaun?” “Ifyouhadeverstudiedthepedigreeofthefar-descendedheirofMonteBeni, as I did,” answered Kenyon, with an irrepressible smile, “you would have retainedfewdoubtsonthatpoint Faunornot,hehadagenialnature,which,had the rest of mankind been in accordance with it, would have made earth a paradisetoourpoorfriend Itseemsthemoralofhisstory,thathumanbeingsof Donatello’scharacter,compoundedespeciallyforhappiness,havenolongerany businessonearth,orelsewhere Lifehasgrownsosadlyserious,thatsuchmen must change their nature, or else perish, like the antediluvian creatures that required, as the condition of their existence, a more summer-like atmosphere thanours.” “Iwillnotacceptyourmoral!”repliedthehopefulandhappy-naturedHilda “Thenhereisanother;takeyourchoice!”saidthesculptor,rememberingwhat Miriamhadrecentlysuggested,inreferencetothesamepoint “Heperpetrateda greatcrime;andhisremorse,gnawingintohissoul,hasawakenedit;developing athousandhighcapabilities,moralandintellectual,whichwenevershouldhave dreamed of asking for, within the scanty compass of the Donatello whom we knew.” “Iknownotwhetherthisisso,”saidHilda “Butwhatthen?” “Herecomesmyperplexity,”continuedKenyon “SinhaseducatedDonatello, andelevatedhim Issin,then,—whichwedeemsuchadreadfulblacknessinthe universe,—is it, like sorrow, merely an element of human education, through which we struggle to a higher and purer state than we could otherwise have attained? Did Adam fall, that we might ultimately rise to a far loftier paradise than his?” “O hush!” cried Hilda, shrinking from him with an expression of horror which wounded the poor, speculative sculptor to the soul “This is terrible;andIcouldweepforyou,ifyouindeedbelieveit Donotyouperceive what a mockery your creed makes, not only of all religious sentiments, but of morallaw?AndhowitannulsandobliterateswhateverpreceptsofHeavenare writtendeepestwithinus?Youhaveshockedmebeyondwords!” “Forgive me, Hilda!” exclaimed the sculptor, startled by her agitation; “I never did believe it! But the mind wanders wild and wide; and, so lonely as I liveandwork,Ihaveneitherpole-starabovenorlightofcottagewindowshere below,tobringmehome Wereyoumyguide,mycounsellor,myinmostfriend, withthatwhitewisdomwhichclothesyouasacelestialgarment,allwouldgo well OHilda,guidemehome!” “We are both lonely; both far from home!” said Hilda, her eyes filling with tears “Iamapoor,weakgirl,andhavenosuchwisdomasyoufancyinme.” Whatfurthermayhavepassedbetweentheselovers,whilestandingbeforethe pillared shrine, and the marble Madonna that marks Raphael’s tomb; whither theyhadnowwandered,weareunabletorecord Butwhenthekneelingfigure beneath the open eye of the Pantheon arose, she looked towards the pair and extended her hands with a gesture of benediction Then they knew that it was Miriam Theysufferedhertoglideoutoftheportal,however,withoutagreeting; forthoseextendedhands,evenwhiletheyblessed,seemedtorepel,asifMiriam stoodontheothersideofafathomlessabyss,andwarnedthemfromitsverge So Kenyon won the gentle Hilda’s shy affection, and her consent to be his bride AnotherhandmusthenceforthtrimthelampbeforetheVirgin’sshrine;for Hilda was coming down from her old tower, to be herself enshrined and worshippedasahouseholdsaint,inthelightofherhusband’sfireside And,now thatlifehadsomuchhumanpromiseinit,theyresolvedtogobacktotheirown land;becausetheyears,afterall,haveakindofemptiness,whenwespendtoo manyofthemonaforeignshore Wedefertherealityoflife,insuchcases,until a future moment, when we shall again breathe our native air; but, by and by, therearenofuturemoments;or,ifwedoreturn,wefindthatthenativeairhas lostitsinvigoratingquality,andthatlifehasshifteditsrealitytothespotwhere we have deemed ourselves only temporary residents Thus, between two countries, we have none at all, or only that little space of either in which we finally lay down our discontented bones It is wise, therefore, to come back betimes,ornever Before they quitted Rome, a bridal gift was laid on Hilda’s table It was a bracelet, evidently of great cost, being composed of seven ancient Etruscan gems, dug out of seven sepulchres, and each one of them the signet of some princelypersonage,whohadlivedanimmemorialtimeago Hildaremembered thispreciousornament IthadbeenMiriam’s;andonce,withtheexuberanceof fancythatdistinguishedher,shehadamusedherselfwithtellingamythicaland magic legend for each gem, comprising the imaginary adventures and catastrophe of its former wearer Thus the Etruscan bracelet became the connectingbondofaseriesofsevenwondroustales,allofwhich,astheywere dug out of seven sepulchres, were characterized by a sevenfold sepulchral gloom; such as Miriam’s imagination, shadowed by her own misfortunes, was wonttoflingoveritsmostsportiveflights Andnow,happyasHildawas,thebraceletbroughtthetearsintohereyes,as being,initsentirecircle,thesymbolofassadamysteryasanythatMiriamhad attachedtotheseparategems For,whatwasMiriam’slifetobe?Andwherewas Donatello?ButHildahadahopefulsoul,andsawsunlightonthemountain-tops CONCLUSION There comes to the author, from many readers of the foregoing pages, a demandforfurtherelucidationsrespectingthemysteriesofthestory Hereluctantlyavailshimselfoftheopportunityaffordedbyanewedition,to explainsuchincidentsandpassagesasmayhavebeenlefttoomuchinthedark; reluctantly, he repeats, because the necessity makes him sensible that he can havesucceededbutimperfectly,atbest,inthrowingaboutthisRomancethekind ofatmosphereessentialtotheeffectatwhichheaimed Hedesignedthestoryandthecharacterstobear,ofcourse,acertainrelation to human nature and human life, but still to be so artfully and airily removed fromourmundanesphere,thatsomelawsandproprietiesoftheirownshouldbe implicitlyandinsensiblyacknowledged The idea of the modern Faun, for example, loses all the poetry and beauty which the Author fancied in it, and becomes nothing better than a grotesque absurdity,ifwebringitintotheactuallightofday Hehadhopedtomystifythis anomalouscreaturebetweentheRealandtheFantastic,insuchamannerthatthe reader’s sympathies might be excited to a certain pleasurable degree, without impelling him to ask how Cuvier would have classified poor Donatello, or to insist upon being told, in so many words, whether he had furry ears or no As respectsallwhoasksuchquestions,thebookis,tothatextent,afailure Nevertheless, the Author fortunately has it in his power to throw light upon several matters in which some of his readers appear to feel an interest To confessthetruth,hewashimselftroubledwithacuriositysimilartothatwhich hehasjustdeprecatedonthepartofhisreaders,andoncetookoccasiontocrossexaminehisfriends,Hildaandthesculptor,andtopryintoseveraldarkrecesses ofthestory,withwhichtheyhadheretoforeimperfectlyacquaintedhim WethreehadclimbedtothetopofSt Peter’s,andwerelookingdownupon theRomeweweresoontoleave,butwhich(havingalreadysinnedsufficiently in that way) it is not my purpose further to describe It occurred to me, that, beingsoremoteintheupperair,myfriendsmightsafelyutterherethesecrets whichitwouldbeperilouseventowhisperonlowerearth “Hilda,” I began, “can you tell me the contents of that mysterious packet which Miriam entrusted to your charge, and which was addressed to Signore LucaBarboni,atthePalazzoCenci?” “Ineverhadanyfurtherknowledgeofit,”repliedHilda,“norfeltitrighttolet myselfbecuriousuponthesubject.” “Astoitsprecisecontents,”interposedKenyon,“itisimpossibletospeak But Miriam,isolatedassheseemed,hadfamilyconnectionsinRome,oneofwhom, thereisreasontobelieve,occupiedapositioninthepapalgovernment “ThisSignoreLucaBarboniwaseithertheassumednameofthepersonagein question,orthemediumofcommunicationbetweenthatindividualandMiriam Now, under such a government as that of Rome, it is obvious that Miriam’s privacy and isolated life could only be maintained through the connivance and supportofsomeinfluentialpersonconnectedwiththeadministrationofaffairs Freeandself-controlledassheappeared,hereverymovementwaswatchedand investigated far more thoroughly by the priestly rulers than by her dearest friends “Miriam,ifImistakenot,hadapurposetowithdrawherselffromthisirksome scrutiny, and to seek real obscurity in another land; and the packet, to be deliveredlongafterherdeparture,containedareferencetothisdesign,besides certainfamilydocuments,whichweretobeimpartedtoherrelativeasfromone deadandgone.” “Yes, it is clear as a London fog,” I remarked “On this head no further elucidation can be desired But when Hilda went quietly to deliver the packet, whydidshesomysteriouslyvanish?” “You must recollect,” replied Kenyon, with a glance of friendly commiserationatmyobtuseness,“thatMiriamhadutterlydisappeared,leaving no trace by which her whereabouts could be known In the meantime, the municipal authorities had become aware of the murder of the Capuchin; and from many preceding circumstances, such as his persecution of Miriam, they must have seen an obvious connection between herself and that tragical event Furthermore,thereisreasontobelievethatMiriamwassuspectedofconnection withsomeplot,orpoliticalintrigue,ofwhichtheremayhavebeentokensinthe packet And when Hilda appeared as the bearer of this missive, it was really quite a matter of course, under a despotic government, that she should be detained.” “Ah, quite a matter of course, as you say,” answered I “How excessively stupidinmenottohaveseenitsooner!Butthereareotherriddles Onthenight of the extinction of the lamp, you met Donatello, in a penitent’s garb, and afterwards saw and spoke to Miriam, in a coach, with a gem glowing on her bosom WhatwasthebusinessofthesetwoguiltyonesinRome,andwhowas Miriam’scompanion?” “Who!” repeated Kenyon, “why, her official relative, to be sure; and as to theirbusiness,Donatello’sstillgnawingremorsehadbroughthimhitherward,in spite of Miriam’s entreaties, and kept him lingering in the neighborhood of Rome, with the ultimate purpose of delivering himself up to justice Hilda’s disappearance,whichtookplacethedaybefore,wasknowntothemthrougha secretchannel,andhadbroughtthemintothecity,whereMiriam,asIsurmise, begantomakearrangements,eventhen,forthatsadfrolicoftheCarnival.” “AndwherewasHildaallthatdrearytimebetween?”inquiredI “Wherewereyou,Hilda?”askedKenyon,smiling Hildathrewhereyesonallsides,andseeingthattherewasnotevenabirdof theairtoflyawaywiththesecret,noranyhumanbeingnearerthantheloiterers bytheobeliskinthepiazzabelow,shetoldusabouthermysteriousabode “IwasaprisonerintheConventoftheSacreCoeur,intheTrinitadeMonte,” said she, “but in such kindly custody of pious maidens, and watched over by such a dear old priest, that—had it not been for one or two disturbing recollections,andalsobecauseIamadaughterofthePuritansIcouldwillingly havedweltthereforever “MyentanglementwithMiriam’smisfortunes,andthegoodabbate’smistaken hopeofaproselyte,seemtomeasufficientclewtothewholemystery.” “Theatmosphereisgettingdelightfullylucid,”observedI,“butthereareone or two things that still puzzle me Could you tell me—and it shall be kept a profound secret, I assure you what were Miriam’s real name and rank, and preciselythenatureofthetroublesthatledtoallthosedirefulconsequences?” “Is it possible that you need an answer to those questions?” exclaimed Kenyon,withanaspectofvastsurprise “HaveyounotevensurmisedMiriam’s name?Thinkawhile,andyouwillassuredlyrememberit Ifnot,Icongratulate youmostsincerely;foritindicatesthatyourfeelingshaveneverbeenharrowed byoneofthemostdreadfulandmysteriouseventsthathaveoccurredwithinthe presentcentury!” “Well,” resumed I, after an interval of deep consideration, “I have but few thingsmoretoask Where,atthismoment,isDonatello?” “TheCastleofSaintAngelo,”saidKenyonsadly,turninghisfacetowardsthat sepulchral fortress, “is no longer a prison; but there are others which have dungeonsasdeep,andinoneofthem,Ifear,liesourpoorFaun.” “Andwhy,then,isMiriamatlarge?”Iasked “Callitcrueltyifyoulike,notmercy,”answeredKenyon “But,afterall,her crimelaymerelyinaglance Shedidnomurder!” “Onlyonequestionmore,”saidI,withintenseearnestness “DidDonatello’s earsresemblethoseoftheFaunofPraxiteles?” “I know, but may not tell,” replied Kenyon, smiling mysteriously “On that point,atallevents,thereshallbenotonewordofexplanation.” Leamington,March14,1860 EndofProjectGutenberg’sTheMarbleFaun,VolumeII.,byNathanielHawthorne ***ENDOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHEMARBLEFAUN,VOLUMEII *** *****Thisfileshouldbenamed2182-h.htmor2182-h.zip***** Thisandallassociatedfilesofvariousformatswillbefoundin: http://www.gutenberg.org/2/1/8/2182/ ProducedbyMichaelPullenandDavidWidger Updatededitionswillreplacethepreviousone theoldeditions willberenamed Creatingtheworksfrompublicdomainprinteditionsmeansthatno oneownsaUnitedStatescopyrightintheseworks,sotheFoundation (andyou!)cancopyanddistributeitintheUnitedStateswithout 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