The city of masks

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TheProjectGutenbergEBookofTheCityofMasks,byGeorgeBarrMcCutcheon ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:TheCityofMasks Author:GeorgeBarrMcCutcheon Illustrator:MayWilsonPreston ReleaseDate:July6,2012[EBook#40146] Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHECITYOFMASKS*** ProducedbyBruceAlbrecht,ErnestSchaal,andtheOnline DistributedProofreadingTeamathttp://www.pgdp.net TheHeadandShouldersofaManRoseQuicklyAbovetheLedge(Page265) THECITYOFMASKSByGEORGEBARRMcCUTCHEONAUTHOROF "Mr Bingle,""JaneCable,""BlackisWhite,"Etc WithFrontispieceByMAY WILSONPRESTONA L BURTCOMPANYPublishersNewYorkPublished byarrangementwithDodd,Mead&Company Copyright,1918 BYDODD,MEADANDCOMPANY,INC PRINTEDINU S A CONTENTS CHAPTERPAGE ILADYJANETHORNECOMESTODINNER1 IIOUTOFTHEFOURCORNERSOFTHEEARTH12 IIITHECITYOFMASKS24 IVTHESCIONOFANEWYORKHOUSE37 VMR THOMASTROTTERHEARSSOMETHINGTOHISADVANTAGE 50 VITHEUNFAILINGMEMORY67 VIITHEFOUNDATIONOFTHEPLOT79 VIIILADYJANEGOESABOUTITPROMPTLY94 IXMR TROTTERFALLSINTOANEWPOSITION110 XPUTTINGTHEIRHEADS—ANDHEARTS—TOGETHER121 XIWINNINGBYANOSE134 XIIINTHEFOG155 XIIINOTCLOUDSALONEHAVELININGS172 XIVDIPLOMACY188 XVONENIGHTATSPANGLER'S202 XVISCOTLANDYARDTAKESAHAND219 XVIIFRIDAYFORLUCK233 XVIIIFRIDAYFORBADLUCK250 XIXFROMDARKNESSTOLIGHT263 XXANEXCHANGEOFCOURTESIES279 XXITHEBRIDE-ELECT294 XXIITHEBEGINNING307 THECITYOFMASKS CHAPTERI LADYJANETHORNECOMESTODINNER THEMarchionesscarefullydrapedthedust-clothovertheheadofanandiron and,beforeputtingthequestiontotheparlour-maid,consulted,withtheintensity of a near-sighted person, the ornate French clock in the centre of the mantelpiece Thenshebrushedherfingersonthevoluminousapronthatalmost completelyenvelopedherslightperson "Well,whoisit,Julia?" "It'sLordTemple,ma'am,andhewantstoknowifyou'retoobusytocometo the'phone Ifyouare,I'mtoaskyousomething." The Marchioness hesitated "How you know it is Lord Eric? Did he mentionhisname?" "He did, ma'am He said 'this is Tom Trotter speaking, Julia, and is your mistress disengaged?' And so I knew it couldn't be any one else but his Lordship." "Andwhatareyoutoaskme?" "He wants to know if he may bring a friend around tonight, ma'am A gentlemanfromConstantinople,ma'am." "A Turk? He knows I not like Turks," said the Marchioness, more to herselfthantoJulia "Hedidn'tsay,ma'am JustConstantinople." TheMarchionessremovedherapronandhandedittoJulia Youwouldhave thought she expected to confront Lord Temple in person, or at least that she wouldbefullyvisibletohimdespitethedistanceandtheinterveningbuildings that lay between Tucking a few stray locks of her snow-white hair into place, she approached the telephone in the hall She had never quite gotten over the impressionthatonecouldbeseenthroughaswellasheardoverthetelephone She always smiled or frowned or gesticulated, as occasion demanded; she was never languid, never bored, never listless A chat was a chat, at long range or short;itdidn'tmatter "Areyouthere?Goodevening,Mr Trotter Socharmedtohearyourvoice." ShehadseatedherselfatthelittleoldItaliantable Mr Trotterdevotedafulltwominutestoexplanations "Do bring him with you," cried she "Your word is sufficient He must be delightful Ofcourse,IshudderedalittlewhenyoumentionedConstantinople I always One can't help thinking of the Armenians Eh? Oh, yes,—and the harems." Mr Trotter:"Bytheway,areyouexpectingLadyJanetonight?" TheMarchioness:"Sherarelyfailsus,Mr Trotter." Mr Trotter:"Right-o!Well,good-bye,—andthankyou I'msureyouwilllike thebaron Heisatrifleseedy,asIsaidbefore,—sailingvessel,youknow,andall thatsortofthing BywayofCapeTown,—prettywellupagainstitforthepast yearortwobesides,—butaregularfellow,astheysayoverhere." TheMarchioness:"Wheredidyousayheisstopping?" Mr Trotter:"Can'tforthelifeofmerememberwhetherit'sthe'Sailors'Loft' or the 'Sailors' Bunk.' He told me too On the water-front somewhere I knew himinHongKong Hesayshehascutitallout,however." TheMarchioness:"Cutitallout,Mr Trotter?" Mr Trotter,laughing:"Drink,andallthatsortofthing,youknow Jollygood thingtoo Igiveyoumypersonalguaranteethathe—" TheMarchioness:"Saynomoreaboutit,Mr Trotter Iamsureweshallall behappytoreceiveanyfriendofyours Bytheway,whereareyounow—where areyoutelephoningfrom?" Mr Trotter:"Drugstorejustaroundthecorner." TheMarchioness:"Abooth,Isuppose?" Mr Trotter:"Oh,yes Tightasasardinebox." TheMarchioness:"Good-bye." Mr Trotter: "Oh—hello? I beg your pardon—are you there? Ah, I—er— neglectedtomentionthatthebaronmaynotappearathisbesttonight Yousee, thepoorchapisashadelargeformyclothes Naturally,beingasailor-man,he hasn't—er—a very extensive wardrobe I am fixing him out in a—er—rather abandoned evening suit of my own That is to say, I abandoned it a couple of seasonsago Rathernobbythingforawaiter,butnot—er—whatyoumightcall —" The Marchioness, chuckling: "Quite good enough for a sailor, eh? Please assure him that no matter what he wears, or how he looks, he will not be conspicuous." After this somewhat ambiguous remark, the Marchioness up the receiver and returned to the drawing-room; a prolonged search revealing the dust-clothonthe"nub"oftheandiron,justwhereshehadleftit,shefelltowork oncemoreonthevelvetysurfaceofarareoldSpanishcabinetthatstoodinthe corneroftheroom "Don'tyouwantyourapron,ma'am?"inquiredJulia,sittingbackonherheels and surveying with considerable pride the leg of an enormous throne seat she hadbeenrubbingwithallthestrengthofherstoutarms Hermistressignoredthequestion Shedabbedintoatinyrecessandwriggled herfingervigorously "Ican'timaginewhereallthedustcomesfrom,Julia,"shesaid "Some of it comes from Italy, and some of it from Spain, and some from France," said Julia promptly "You could rub for a hundred years, ma'am, and there'dstillbedustthatyoucouldn'tfind,nottosaveyoursoul Andwhynot? I'd bet my last penny there's dust on that cabinet this very minute that settled beforeNapoleonwasborn,wheneverthatwas." "Idaresay,"saidtheMarchionessabsently MoreoftenthanotherwiseshefailedtohearallthatJuliasaidtoher,orinher presencerather,forJulia,wiseinassociation,hadcometoconsidertheselapses ofinattentionasopeningsforprolongedandrarelycoherentsoliloquiesontopics ofthemoment Julia,byvirtueoflongserviceandamostsatisfyingavoidance of matrimony, was a privileged servant between the hours of eight in the morning and eight in the evening After eight, or more strictly speaking, the moment dinner was announced, Julia became a perfect servant She would no more have thought of addressing the Marchioness as "ma'am" than she would havecalledtheKingofEngland"mister."ShehadcrossedtheAtlanticwithher mistress eighteen years before; in mid-ocean she celebrated her thirty-fifth birthday,and,asshehadbeeninthefamilyfortenyearspriortothatevent,even a child may solve the problem that here presents a momentary and totally unnecessary break in the continuity of this narrative Julia was English She spoke no other language Beginning with the soup, or the hors d'œuvres on occasion,FrenchwasspokeninthehouseoftheMarchioness Physicallyunable to speak French and psychologically unwilling to betray her ignorance, Julia becameamodelservant Shelapsedintoperfectsilence TheMarchionessseldomifeverdinedalone Shealwaysdinedinstate Her guests,—English, Italian, Russian, Belgian, French, Spanish, Hungarian, Austrian,German,—conversedsolelyinFrench Itwasaveryagreeablewayof symphonizingBabel The room in which she and the temporarily imperfect though treasured servantwereemployedintheduskofthisstormydayinMarchwasatthetopof anold-fashionedbuildinginthebusiestsectionofthecity,abuildingthathad,so far, escaped the fate of its immediate neighbours and remained, a squat and insignificantpygmy,elbowingwithsomearrogancetheloftystructuresthathad shotuponeithersideofitwithincredibleswiftness Itwasalargeroom,atleastthirtybyfiftyfeetindimensions,withavaulted ceiling that encroached upon the space ordinarily devoted to what architects, buildersandtheBoardofHealthdescribeasanairchamber,nextbelowtheroof Therewasnoelevatorinthebuilding Onehadtoclimbfourflightsofstairsto reachtheapartment Fromitslong,heavilycurtainedwindowsonelookeddownuponacrowded cross-town thoroughfare, or up to the summit of a stupendous hotel on the oppositesideofthestreet Therewasasmallfoyerattherearofthisloftyroom, withanentrancefromthenarrowhalloutside Suspendedinthewidedoorway between the two rooms was a pair of blue velvet Italian portières of great antiquity and, to a connoisseur, unrivaled quality Beyond the foyer and extendingtotheareawallwastherathercommodiousdining-room,withitslong oaken English table, its high-back chairs, its massive sideboard and the chandelier that is said to have in the Doges' Palace when the Bridge of Sighswasanewandthrivingavenueofcommunication Atleast,sostatedthedealer'stagtuckedcarelesslyamongthecrystalprisms, supplying the observer with the information that, in case one was in need of a chandelier, its price was five hundred guineas The same curious-minded observerwouldhavediscovered,ifhewerenotabovegettingdownonhishands andkneesandpeeringunderthetable,apricetag;andbyexertingthestrength necessarytopullthesideboardawayfromthewall,asimilarobjectwouldhave beenexposed In other words, if one really wanted to purchase any article of furniture or decoration in the singularly impressive apartment of the Marchioness, all one hadtodowastosignifythedesire,produceacheckoritsequivalent,andgivean addresstothecompetent-lookingyoungwomanwhowouldputinanappearance withsingularpromptnessinresponsetoacoupleofpunchesatanelectricbutton justoutsidethedoor,anytimebetweennineandfiveo'clock,Sundaysincluded The drawing-room contained many priceless articles of furniture, wholly antique—(andsoguaranteed),besidesrugs,draperies,tapestriesandstuffsofthe rarestquality Bronzes,porcelains,pottery,thingsofjadeandalabaster,sconces, candlesticks and censers, with here and there on the walls lovely little "primitives"ofuntoldvalue Themostexotictastehadorderedthedistribution and arrangement of all these objects There was no suggestion of crowding, nothing haphazard or bizarre in the exposition of treasure, nothing to indicate thatacheapintelligencerevelledinrichpossessions You would have sat down upon the first chair that offered repose and you would have said you had wandered inadvertently into a palace Then, emboldened by an interest that scorned politeness, you would have got up to inspect the riches at close range,—and you would have found price-marks everywheretoovercometheimpressionthatAladdinhadbeenrubbinghislamp allthewayupthedingy,tortuousstairs Youarenot,however,intheshopofadealerinantiques,price-markstothe contrary Youareinthehomeof aMarchioness,andsheisnotadealerinold furniture,youmaybequitesureofthat Shedoesnotoweapennyonasingle articleintheapartmentnordoesshe,ontheotherhand,ownapenny'sworthof anythingthatmeetstheeye,—unless,ofcourse,oneexceptsthedust-clothand thecanofpolishthatfollowsJuliaabouttheroom Norisitaloanexhibit,nor thesettingforabazaar Theapartmentbeingonthetopfloorofafive-storybuilding,itisnecessary toaccountfortheremainingfour Intherearofthefourthfloortherewasasmall kitchen and pantry from which a dumb-waiter ascended and descended with vehement enthusiasm The remainder of the floor was divided into four rather smallchambers,eachopeningintotheouterhall,withtwobath-roomsinserted Each of these rooms contained a series of lockers, not unlike those in a clubhouse Otherwise they were unfurnished except for a few commonplace cane bottomchairsinvariousstagesofdecrepitude The third floor represented a complete apartment of five rooms, daintily furnished ThiswaswheretheMarchionessreallylived Commerce,afterafashion,occupiedthetwolowerfloors Itstoppedshortat thebottomofthesecondflightofstairswhereitencounteredanobstacleinthe shape of a grill-work gate that bore the laconic word "Private," and while commercemayhavepeepedinquisitivelythroughandbeyondthebarrieritwas never permitted to trespass farther than an occasional sly, surreptitious and unavailingtwistoftheknob The entire second floor was devoted to work-rooms in which many sewing machinesbuzzedduringthedayandwenttorestatsixintheevening Tables, chairs, manikins, wall-hooks and hangers thrust forward a bewildering assortmentoffabricsinallstagesofdevelopment,fromanoriginaluncutpiece toapracticallycompletedgarment Inotherwords,herewasthework-shopof themostexclusive,mostexpensivemodisteinallthegreatcity Thegroundfloor,orratherthefloorabovetheEnglishbasement,contained the salon and fitting rooms of an establishment known to every woman in the cityas DEBORAH'S Stuyvesantwentdownthestepsandintothestreet,puzzledandsickatheart Hepausedirresolutelyjustoutsidetheentrance IftheywerereallytheLord Temple and the Lady Jane Thorne whose appearance in the marriage license bureauatCityHallhadprovidedasmallsensationforthemorningnewspapers, itwouldn'tbeabadideatoletthemseethathewasreadyandwillingtoforget andforgive— "Moveon,now!Getamove,you!"orderedO'Flaherty,givinghimashove CHAPTERXXII THEBEGINNING THE brisk, businesslike little clergyman was sorely disappointed He had looked forward to a rather smart affair, so to speak, on the afternoon of the fifteenth Indeed,hehadgonetosomepainstopreparehimselfforaneventfar outoftheordinary Itisn'teverydaythatonehastheopportunitytoperforma ceremony wherein a real Lord and Lady plight the troth; it isn't every parson who can say he has officiated for nobility Such an event certainly calls for a littlemorethanthecustomarypreparations Hegotouthisnewestvestmentsand didnotneglecttobrushhishair Hisshoeswerehighlypolishedfortheoccasion and his nails shone with a brightness that fascinated him Moreover, he had tuneduphisvoice;ithadgonestalewiththemonotonyofcountlessmarriagesin whichherarelytookthetroubletonoticewhethertheresponseswereproperly made Bydintofalittleextraexertionintherectoryhehadbroughtittoafine stateofunctuousmellowness Moreover, he had given some thought to the prayer It wasn't going to be a perfunctory,listlessthing,thisprayerforLordandLadyTemple Itwastobea profoundutterance Theglib,everydayprayerwouldn'tdoatallonanoccasion like this The church would be filled with the best people in New York Something fine and resonant and perhaps a little personal,—something to withGod,ofcourse,but,inthemain,worthlisteningto Infact,somethingfrom thediaphragm,sonorous Foralittlewhilehewouldtakeoffthewell-wornmaskofhumilityandbask inthefulgentraysofhisownlight But, to repeat, he was sorely disappointed Instead of beaming upon an assemblageoftheelect,hefoundhimselfconfrontedbyacompanythatcaused himtoquestionhisowngoodtasteinshavingespeciallyfortheoccasionandin wearinggold-rimmednose-glassesinsteadofthe"overtheears"heusuallywore wheninhaste He saw,withshockedand incredulouseyes,sparselyplantedaboutthedim churchasifseparatedbytheorderofonewhorealizedthatclosercontactwould result in something worse than passive antagonism, a strange and motley company For a moment he trembled Had he, by some horrible mischance, set two weddings for the same hour? He cudgelled his brain as he peeped through the vestry door A sickening blank! He could recall no other ceremony for that particular hour,—and yet as he struggled for a solution the conviction became stronger that he had committed a most egregious error Then and there, in a perspiring panic, he solemnly resolved to give these weddings a little more thought Hehadbeengettingabitslack,—reallyquitehaphazardincheckingoff thedailygrist What was he to when the noble English pair and their friends put in an appearance?DespitethefactthattheyoungAmericansailor-chapwhocameto see him about the service had casually remarked that it was to be a most informalaffair,—with"notrimmings"orsomethinglikethat,—heknewthatso far as these people were concerned, simplicity was merely comparative Doubtless, the young couple, affecting simplicity, would appear without coronets;theguestsprobablywouldsaunterinand,inaratherdégagéfashion, find seats for themselves without deigning to notice the obsequious verger in attendance And here was the church partially filled,—certainly the best seats weretaken,—byamostunseemlylotofpeople!Whatwastobedoneaboutit? He looked anxiously about for the sexton Then he glanced at his watch Ten minutestospare Someonetappedhimontheshoulder Heturnedtofacethestalwartyoung navalofficer Atallyoungmanwasstandingatsomedistancebehindtheofficer, clumsilydrawingonapairofpearlgreygloves Heworeamonocle Thegood pastor'slookofdistressdeepened "Good afternoon," said the smiling lieutenant "You see I got him here on time,sir." "Yes, yes," murmured the pastor "Ha-ha! Ha-ha!" He laughed in his customaryway Notonebutathousand"bestmen"hadspokenthoseverywords tohimbefore Theremarkcalledforalaugh Ithadbecomeahabit "Iseverybodyhere?"inquiredAylesworth,peepingoverhisshoulderthrough thecrackinthedoor Thepastorbethoughthimselfandgentlyclosedthedoor, whereupon the best man promptly opened it again and resumed his stealthy scrutinyofthedimedifice "Ican'tfastenthisbeastlything,Aylesworth,"saidthetallyoungmaninthe background "Wouldyoumindseeingwhatyoucandowiththeballything?" "I see the Countess there," said Aylesworth, still gazing "And the Marchioness,and—" "TheMarchioness?"murmuredthepastor,infreshdismay "Iguessthey'reallhere,"wentonthebestman,turningawayfromthedoor andjoininghisnervouscompanion "I'dsoonerfacearegimentofcavalrythan—"beganEricTemple "MayIhavethepleasureandthehonourofgreetingLordTemple?"saidthe little minister, approaching with outstretched hand "A—er—a very happy occasion, your lordship Perhaps I would better explain the presence in the churchofa—er—ratherunusualcrowdof—er—shallwesaycuriosity-seekers? Yousee,thisisanopenchurch Thedoorsarealwaysopentothepublic Very queerpeoplesometimesgetin,despitethewatchfulnessoftheattendant,usually, Imaysay,whenaweddingofsuchprominence—ahem!—er—" "I don't in the least mind," said Lord Temple good-humouredly "If it's any treattothem,letthemstay Sureyou'vegotthering,Aylesworth?Isay,I'msorry now we didn't have a rehearsal It isn't at all simple You said it would be, confoundyou You—" "Allyouhavetodo,oldchap,istogiveyourarmtoLadyJaneandfollowthe Baronessandmetothechancel Say'Ido'and'Iwill'toeverything,andbefore youknowityou'llcometoandfindyourselfstillbreathingandwalkingonair Isn'tthatso,Doctor?" "Quite,—quiteso,Iamsure." "Letmetakeapeepoutthere,Aylesworth I'dliketogetmybearings." "Praydonotbedismayedbythe—"begantheminister "Hullo!There'sBrambysittinginthefrontseat,—myword,I'veneverknown him to look so seraphic Old Fogazario, and de Bosky, and—yes, there's Mirabeau,andtheamiableMrs MosesJacobs 'Gad,she'sresplendent!DuBara and Herman and—By Jove, they're all here, every one of them I say, Aylesworth, what time is it? I wonder if anything can have happened to Jane? Runouttothesidewalk,oldchap,andhavealook,willyou?I—" "Are all bridegrooms like this?" inquired Aylesworth drily, addressing the bewilderedminister "Here she is!" sang out the bridegroom, leaping toward the little vestibule "Thankheaven,Jane!Ithoughtyou'dmetwithanaccidentor—MyGod!How lovelyyouare,darling!Isn'tshe,Aylesworth?" "Permit me to present you, Doctor, to Lady Jane Thorne," interposed Aylesworth "AndtotheBaronessBrangwyng." Fromthatmomenton,thelittledivinewasinadaze Hedidn'tknowwhatto make of anything Everything was wrong and yet everything was right! How coulditbe? Howwashetoknowthathisquaint,unpretentiouslittlechurchwashalf-full of masked men and women? How was he to know that these queer-looking peopleouttherewerecountsandcountesses,baronsandbaronesses,princesand princesses?SwarthyItalians,sallow-facedFrenchmen,darkHungarians,bearded RussiansandpompousTeutons!Howwashetoknowthatonceuponatimeall ofthesehadgonewithoutmasksinthestreetsandcourtsoffar-offlandsandhad worn"purpleandfinelinen"?Andthoseplainly,poorlydressedwomen?Where, —ohwhere,werethesmartNewYorkersforwhomhehadfurbishedhimselfup soneatly? Whatmannerofcompanionshadthislovelybride,—ah,butshehadthereal atmosphere!—Whatsortofpeoplehadshebeenthrownwithduringherstayin theCityofNewYork?Shewhomighthaveknownthebest,themostexclusive, —"blessme,whatapity!" Hereandthereinthemotleythrong,heespiedafigurethatsuggestedupper FifthAvenue Thelittleladywiththesnow-whitehair;thetallbrunettewiththe rather stunning hat; the austere gentleman far in the rear, the ruddy faced old manbehindhim,andtheaggressive-lookingindividualwiththegreennecktie,— Yes,anyoneofthemmighthavecomefromuptownandoughttofeelsomewhat outofplaceinthissingulargathering Thethreegentlemenespecially Hesized them up as financiers, as plutocrats And yet they were back where the family servantsusuallysat Hegotthroughwiththeservice,—indulgently,itistobefeared,afterall Hewouldsay,onthewhole,thathehadneverseenahandsomercouplethan LordandLadyTemple Therewascompensationinthat Anyonewithhalfan eyecouldseethattheycameoftheverybeststock AndthelittleBaroness,—he hadneverseenabaronessbefore,—wassomebody,too Shepossessedmanner, —thatindefinablethingtheycalledmanner,—therewasnomistakeaboutit He had no means of knowing, of course, that she was struggling hard to make a livinginthe"artistcolony"downtown Well,well,itisastrangeworld,afterall Younevercantell,musedthelittle pastorashestoodintheentranceofhischurchwithhalf-a-dozenreportersand watchedthestrangecompanydisperse,—someinmotors,someinhansoms,and others on the soles of their feet A large lady in many colours ran for a southboundstreetcar Hewonderedwhoshecouldbe Thecook,perhaps Lieutenant Aylesworth was saying good-bye to the bride and groom at the Grand Central Station The train for Montreal was leaving shortly before ten o'clock The wedding journey was to carry them through Canada to the Pacific and backtoNewYork,leisurely,bywayofthePanamaCanal LordFenlewhadnot beenniggardly Allhedemandedofhisgrandsoninreturnwasthattheyshould cometoFenlewHallbeforethefirstofAugust "LookusuptheinstantyousetfootinEngland,Sammy,"saidEric,gripping hisfriend'shand "Watchthenewspapers You'llseewhenourshipcomeshome, andafterthatyou'llfindusholdingoutourarmstoyou." "Whenmyshipleaveshome,"saidtheAmerican,"Ihopeshe'llsteerforan Englishport Good-bye,LadyTemple Pleaselivetobeahundred,that'sallIask ofyou." "Good-bye, Sam," she said, blushing as she uttered the name he had urged hertouse "Youwon'tmindlettingthechildrencallmeUncleSam,willyou?"hesaid,a drolltwisttohislips "Howquaint!"shemurmured "ByJove,Sammy,"criedEricwarmly,"you'venoideahowmuchbetteryou lookinUncleSam'suniformthanyoudidinthatstuffyfrockcoatthisafternoon Thank God, I can get into a uniform myself before long You wouldn't understand,oldchap,howgooditfeelstobeinaBritishuniform." "I'mafraidwe'veoutgrowntheBritishuniform,"saidtheotherdrily "Itused toberathercommonoverhere,youknow." "Youdon'tknowwhatallthismeanstome,"saidTempleseriously,hishand stillclaspingtheAmerican's "Icanholdupmyheadoncemore Icanfightfor England Ifsheneedsme,Icanfightanddieforher." "You're a queer lot, you Britishers," drawled the American "You want to fightanddieforOldEngland Ihaveasingularlycontraryambition Iwantto liveandfightforAmerica." On the twenty-fourth of July, 1914, Lord Eric Temple and his bride came hometoEngland THEEND TranscriberNotes: Throughout the dialogues, there were words used to mimic accents of the speakers Those words wereretainedas-is Theillustrationshavebeenmovedsothattheydonotbreakupparagraphsandsothattheyarenext tothetexttheyillustrate Thusthepagenumberoftheillustrationmightnotmatchthepagenumberin theListofIllustrations,andtheorderofillustrationsmaynotbethesameintheListofIllustrationsand inthebook Errorsinpunctuationsandinconsistenthyphenationwerenotcorrectedunlessotherwisenoted Onpage9,"Marchiness"wasreplacedwith"Marchioness" Onpage18,"unforgetable"wasreplacedwith"unforgettable" Onpage22,"respendent"wasreplacedwith"resplendent" Onpage26,"idlness"wasreplacedwith"idleness" Onpage47,"sacrified"wasreplacedwith"sacrificed" Onpage53,"spooffing"wasreplacedwith"spoofing" Onpage67,"shan't"wasreplacedwith"sha'n't" Onpage69,"constitutency"wasreplacedwith"constituency" Onpage78,"assed"wasreplacedwith"passed" Onpage80,"acccepting"wasreplacedwith"accepting" Onpage81,"lookingly"wasreplacedwith"looking" Onpage103,"acccused"wasreplacedwith"accused" Onpage107,"afternooon"wasreplacedwith"afternoon" Onpage224,"limmo"wasreplacedwith"limo" Onpage230,"pressent"wasreplacedwith"present" Onpage233,"EOR"wasreplacedwith"FOR" Onpage235,aperiodwasplacedafter"inthedepths" Onpage240,"tobaccco"wasreplacedwith"tobacco" Onpage244,"crochetty"wasreplacedwith"crotchety" Onpage247,"properely"wasreplacedwith"properly" Onpage259,"expained"wasreplacedwith"explained" EndofProjectGutenberg'sTheCityofMasks,byGeorgeBarrMcCutcheon ***ENDOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHECITYOFMASKS*** *****Thisfileshouldbenamed40146-h.htmor40146-h.zip***** Thisandallassociatedfilesofvariousformatswillbefoundin: http://www.gutenberg.org/4/0/1/4/40146/ ProducedbyBruceAlbrecht,ErnestSchaal,andtheOnline DistributedProofreadingTeamathttp://www.pgdp.net Updatededitionswillreplacethepreviousone theoldeditions 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