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TheProjectGutenbergEBookofHighNoon,byAnonymous ThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwith almostnorestrictionswhatsoever Youmaycopyit,giveitawayor re-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincluded withthiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.org Title:HighNoon ANewSequelto'ThreeWeeks'byElinorGlyn Author:Anonymous ReleaseDate:May20,2007[EBook#21540] Language:English ***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKHIGHNOON*** ProducedbySuzanneShell,SankarViswanathan,andthe OnlineDistributedProofreadingTeamathttp://www.pgdp.net Cover NatalieVseslavitchFromaminiatureintheVerdaynecollection NatalieVseslavitch FromaminiatureintheVerdaynecollection HIGHNOON ANEWSEQUELTO “THREEWEEKS” ANONYMOUS Seal NEWYORK THEMACAULAYCOMPANY 1911 COPYRIGHT,1911,BY THEMACAULAYCOMPANY FOREWORD Imustmakeaconfession It will not be needed by the many thousands who have lived with me the wonderfulsunriseofPaul'slove,andthesadgraymorningofhisbereavement To these friends who, with Paul, loved and mourned his beautiful Queen and their dear son, the calm peace and serenity of the high noon of Paul's life will seembutwell-deservedhappiness ItistotheothersIspeak Inlifeitisrarelygivenustolearntheendaswellasthebeginning Totellthe wholestoryisonlyanauthor'sprivilege Of the events which made Paul's love-idyl possible, but a mere hint has been given Ifatsomefuturetimeitseemsbest,Imaytellyoumoreofthem Asfar asPaulhimselfisconcerned,youhavehadbutthefirsttwochaptersofhisstory Here is the third of the trilogy, his high noon And with the sun once more breakingthroughthecloudsinPaul'sheart,wewillleavehim You need not read any more of this book than you wish, since I claim the privilegeofnotwritinganymorethanIchoose Butifyoudoreaditthrough, youwillfeelwithmethatthegreatlawofcompensationisoncemorejustified Assorrowisthefruitofourmistakes,soeverlastingpeaceshouldbethereward ofourheart'sbestendeavor Sadnessispast;joycomeswithHighNoon "TheQueenisdead LonglivetheQueen!" THEAUTHOR HIGHNOON CHAPTERI I t was Springtime in Switzerland! Once more the snow-capped mountains mirroredtheirproudheadsinsapphirelakes;andonthebeechesbythebanksof Lake Lucerne green buds were bursting into leaves Everywhere were bright signsoftheearth'sawakening SpringtimeinSwitzerland!Andthat,youknow— you young hearts to whom the gods are kind—is only another way of saying Paradise! TowardsParadise,then,thunderedtheafternoonexpressfromParis,bearingthe advance guard of the summer seekers after happiness But if the cumbrous coachescarriedswiftlyonwardsomegayhearts,someyoungloverstonever-tobe-forgotten scenes, one there was among the throng to whom the world was gray—anEnglishgentlemanthis,whogazedindifferentlyuponthebrightvistas flitting past his window The London Times reposed unopened by his side; Punch, Le Figaro, Jugend had pleased him not and tumbled to the floor unnoticed There seemed scant reason for such deep abstraction in one who bore the outward signs of so vigorous a manhood Tall, well-formed, muscular as his faultlessclotheshalfrevealed,halfhid,hisbronzedfacebearingthecleareyes and steady lips of a man much out of doors, this thoughtful Englishman was indeed a man to catch and hold attention No callow youth, was he, but in the prime of life—strong, clean, distinguished in appearance, with hair slightly silveredatthetemples;amanwhohadlivedfully,womenwouldhavesaid,but whowasnowabitwearyoftheworld SmallwonderthatthesmartAmericangirlsittingoppositeinthecompartment stared at him with frank interest, or an elegantly gowned Parisienne demimondaine (travelling incognito as the Comtesse de Boistelle) eyed him tentativelythroughherlorgnette SoSirPaulVerdaynesatthatafternooninacompartmentofthethroughexpress, allunconsciousofthescrutinyofhisfellowtravellers;hisheartfilledwiththe dogged determination to face the future and make the best of it like a true Englishman; somewhat saddened—yes—but still unbroken in spirit by the sorrowsthathadbeenhis Many years ago it was, since he had vowed to revisit the Springplace of his youth, Lucerne, a spot so replete with tender memories, and each succeeding year had found him making anew his pilgrimage, though a sombre warp of sorrowwasnowinterwoveninthegoldenwoofofhisyounghappiness Thisyearhehaddecidedshouldbethelast Notthathisdevotiontohisbeloved Queenhadlessened—farfromthat—butthelatentspiritofaction,soinnateto true British blood was slowly reasserting itself For Paul romance might still remain,butasathingnowpast Hewasfrankwithhimselfinthisrespect,and hewouldbefrankwithIsabellaWaringtoo Onemorevisithewouldpaytothescenesofhislove-idyl,totheplacewhere hisbelovedImperatorskoyehadcomeintohislife,theretocommuneagainwith herinspirit,theretofeelherregalpresence,toseekfromherthatfinalsupreme consolationwhichhiswoundedheartcraved—thiswasPaul'squest Andthenhe wouldreturntoEngland—andIsabella Itwastheconsiderationofthisresolutionwhichshuttheflyingsceneryfromhis gaze,whichdrewfinelinesaboutthecornersofhisfirmlips,andsethisfaceto suchalookofdominantstrengthasmadethehighspiritedAmericangirlmuse thoughtfully and brought a touch of colour to the face of the pseudo Countess whichwasnotduetotheartificeofhermaid Suchmenaremastersoftheirown PaulVerdaynewasnotamantoshirkresponsibilities Itistrue,darkdayshad cometohim,whenacrushingburdenhadwell-nighsmotheredhim,andabullet tostillhisfeveredbrainhadseemedfarsweetertoPaulthanallelselifemight holdforhim ButPaulwasstrongandyoung Helearnedhislessonwell—that Time cures all and that the scars of sorrow, though they form but slowly, still willhealwiththepassingoftheyears Paulwasstillyoungandhehadmuchtolivefor,astheworldreckons Hewas rich(athingnottobelightlyheld),oneofthemostpopularM P.'sinEngland, and the possessor of a fine old name It would be a coward's part, surely, to spendtherestofhislifeinbemoaningthedeadpast Hewouldtakeuptheduties thatlaynearathand,becomethetruesuccessorofhisrespectedfather,oldSir Charles, and delight the heart of his fond mother, the Lady Henrietta, by marryingIsabellaWaring,thesweetheartofhisboyhooddays So Paul sat communing with himself as the train rushed noisily on, sat and settled,asmenwill,thefuturewhichtheyknownotof Alasforresolves!Alas fortheLadyHenrietta!AlasforIsabella!ForPaul,asforallofus,themutability ofhumanaffairsstillexisted Wereitnotso,thisrecordneverwouldhavebeen written CHAPTERII W ith much grinding of brakes and hiss of escaping steam, the express at last stopped slowly in the little station and the door of Paul's compartment was swung open by the officious guard with a "Lucerne, your Lordship," which effectuallyarousedhimfromhisreverie Paulquietlysteppedoutofthecar,andwaitedwiththeairofoneamongfamiliar scenes,whilehismanBaxtercollectedtheluggageanddexterouslyconvoyedit throughthehostilearmyofcustomsmentoafiacre Inthemidstofthebustle andconfusion,asPaulstoodthereontheplatform,hisstraightmanlyformwas the cynosure of all eyes A fond mamma with a marriageable daughter half unconsciouslysighedaloudatthethoughtofsuchason-in-law Apairofslender Frenchdandiesoutwardly scorned,butinwardlyadmiredhisathleticfigure,so visiblypowerful,eveninrepose But all oblivious to the attention he was attracting, Paul waited with passive patienceforthesurveyofhisluggage Forwasnotallthisanold,oldstoryto him, a trifling disturbance on the path of his pilgrimage? When one travels to travel,eachstationisanincident;notsotohimwhojourneystoanend ButPaulwasnotdestinedtoremainwhollyuninterrupted Astheothertravellers descended from the carriage and formed a little knot upon the platform, the ComtessedeBoistelle,nowoccupiedwithabetuftedpoodlefriskingattheend ofaleash,strolledbyhim AsshepassedPaulshedroppedajewelledreticule, which he promptly recovered for her, offering it with a grave face and a murmured"Permettezmoi,Madame." TheComtessegentlybreathedathousandthanks,allowinghercarefullygloved handtobrushPaul'sarm "Monsieurisweariedwiththejourney,perhaps?"shesaidinalowvoice And hereyesaddedmorethansolicitude Pauldidnotdenyit Instead,heraisedhisgreenAlpinehatformallyandturned impassively to meet his man, who had by then stowed away the boxes in the Waitingfiacre In the group of Paul's late companions stood the American girl who had sat facinghimallthewayfromParis Hewasnosooneroutofearshotthan— "Didyousee,Mamma?"shewhisperedtothematronbesideher "Seewhat,Daisy?" "ThatFrenchcreature—shetriedtotalktomybigEnglishman,buthesnubbed her What a fine chap he must be! I knew he had a title, and I'm just dying to meethim Doyousupposehe'llstayatourhotel?Ifhedoes,I'llfindsomebody whoknowsallabouthim NowIunderstandwhysomanyAmericangirlsmarry titledEnglishmen Ifthey'reallasniceasthisone,Idon'tblamethem,doyou?" "Hush,child,hush!"hermotherreproved "Howcanyourunonsoaboutatotal stranger?" But the girl merely smiled softly to herself in answer, as she watched Paul's straightbackrecedingdowntheplatform Overwhelmedwitharushofmemories,Paulclimbedintothecarriage Itwasa fineafternoon,buthedidnotseethegiantmountainsrearingtheirheadsforhim asproudlyinthesunshineasevertheyhadheldthemsincetheworldwasnew For Paul just now was lost in the infinite stretches of the past, those immeasurable fields through which the young wander blithely, all unconscious ofaughtbutthebeautifulflowerssoruthlesslytrampledon,thelusciousfruitsso wantonly plucked, the limpid streams drunk from so greedily, and the cool shadesinwhichtosinkintountroubledsleep Ah!iftherewerenoawakening!Ifonewerealwaysyoung! The fiacre stopped; and soon Paul found himself in the hall of the hotel, surrounded by officious porters The mtre d'hơtel himself, a white-haired Swiss, pushed through them and greeted him, for was not Sir Paul an old and distinguished guest, who never failed to honour him with his patronage each year?Himself,heshowedPaultothesamesuitehealwaysoccupied,andwith zealous care conferred with milord over the momentous question of dinner, a matternottobelightlydiscussed "And the wine? Ah! the TokayiImperial, of a certainty Absolutely, Monsieur, Hishalf-blindedeyesweregreetedbythesightwhichhehaddreadedeversince hehadcometothefarmonthehill Nataliewasfightingdesperately,andforlife,withBoris With a great cry Paul leapt forward, but he was too late to exercise that vengeancewhichhadnowfullpossessionofhissoul BorisflungNatalietooneside,andforasecondturnedhispallidface,inwhich hiseyeswereburninglikeamadman's,fullonPaulashedashedonhim Then without a sound he leapt aside, and vaulting on to the sill of the open window,jumpedout InstinctivelyPaulknewwhatwascoming,andcatchingNatalietohim,heldher headagainsthisbreast,stoppingherearswithhishands Thenashestoodthere withhiseyesbentonherhair,heheardthesickeningsoundofBoris'sbodythud ontothestonesbelow ReleasingNatalie'sears,heputhishandunderherchinandliftedupherface Hemarvelledthatshehadnotfainted,butthedreadfulhorrorinhereyesstruck intohisheartlikeablow Hehadtoholdhertopreventherfallingtothefloor,andsohestoodforsome fewsecondswithherformlimpandshiveringinhisarms Bracing himself for one last effort, Paul lifted her up and bore her out of the room Half-dazed,hestumbleddownthestairswithheruntilhereachedthehall InthedoorwayhesawPeter,whocamerunningforwardwithoutstretchedarms "Just a minute," said Paul quickly, and he walked into the room, the door of whichhehadshattered InthemeantimeAndrieffandtheladhadpickedupMadameEstelleandcarried her into the same room, and now she lay on the couch, her face growing grey with the shadows of death, and her breath coming fast and feebly Her eyes staredupattheceilingwithanintenseandhorriblefixity Paulpushedanarmchairroundwithhisfootandsethisladydownonitsothat herbackwasturnedtothedyingwoman Peterfellonhiskneesbesidethechair,andseizinghissister'shands,heldthem againsthisbreast PaulcrossedovertoMadameEstelleandstoodoverher Heputhishandagainst herheartandlistenedtoherbreathing "Iamafraid,"hesaidinalowvoicetoAndrieff,"thatwecandonothingforher Itisabadbusiness Heavenforgiveherforanythingshehasdoneamiss!Shedid herbesttomakeamends." ThenhedrewAlexisoutoftheroomandtoldhimtofetchalamp WhenhehadfetchedthelampPaultookitandbeganrapidlytoexamineround thegroundflooroftheramblingbuilding Hewasseekingforthecourt-yardinto whichBorishadfallen Atlasttheyfoundit,andfound,too,allthatremainedofBorisIvanovitch He wasbatteredandcrushedandbruisedalmostbeyondrecognition Paulsethisfaceandstraightenedthetwistedanddistortedbodyout Thenhestraightenedhimself,andpickingupthelampledthewaybackintothe house By this time Natalie, though very pale and still shaken, was quite composed Indeed, she was now more self-possessed than her brother She was doing her utmosttoquiethisstillpainfulagitation Paul looked into her face, and seeing how strong and resolute it was, felt no hesitationinspeakingbeforeher "Sir,"hesaidveryquietlytoPeter,"Borisisdead." Peterglancedathimquicklyandthenturnedtohissister "Thankheaven!"hecried "Hush," said Natalie, gently, and taking her brother by the arm she pointed to MadameEstelle Andrieffhaddonewhathecould,andtheunhappywomanhad,tosomeextent, comebacktoconsciousness She was indeed sufficiently alive to catch Paul's words She brought her fast fadingeyesdownfromtheceilingandsearchedhisface "Boris!"shemutteredtoherself:"Boris!" Pauldrewnearandkneltdownbythecouch Hetookoneofherhands,which waseventhengrowingcold "Boris?"sheaskedagaininavoicescarcelyaboveawhisper Paulputhismouthdowntoherearandsaidslowly,"Heisdead." Theshockofthenewsactedonthewomaninamostextraordinaryway Witha convulsivemovementshesuddenlygatheredherselftogetherandsatboltupright onthecouch ShewouldhavefallenbackagainhadnotPaulcaughtherinhis arms Thewomanopenedhermouthandmadetwoorthreeeffortsbeforeshespoke again,andthensheonlybreathedtheword"Boris!" Paul'sgazewanderedovertheside-board "Seeifyoucanfindanybrandy,"hesaidtoAndrieff,whoinstantlyproduceda decanter Paultooktheglassfromhishandandpressed itto MadameEstelle'slips She revivedalittle,andsuddenlyspokeclearlyandinalmosthernormalvoice "Sir Paul," she said, "forgive!" Then her eyes became fixed and staring, and it wasPaulwhodrewthedeadwoman'seyelidsdown "SirPaul,"saidPeter,earnestly,"itissimplyimpossiblethatIshalleverbeable torepayyouthegreatserviceyouhaverenderedme But,believeme,ifthereis anythingintheworlditiswithinmypowertogiveyou,youhavebuttoaskto receiveit." PaullookedacrossatNatalie,butsaidnothing Thetimehadnotyetcomewhen hecouldaskPeterforthatwhichwouldathousandtimesrepayhim CHAPTERXXVII P aulnever quite knewhowheretracedthedistancetotheVseslavitchmansion Thecombinedeffectsoftheblowhehadreceivedatthehandsofthetreacherous servant, the fall at the gate, and the long hours of mental anguish he had undergone, were quite enough to befog his brain He rode back reeling in his saddle,andonceinhisbedhestayedtherefortwodaysbeforehewashimself again Whenhejoinedtheothersatlasthefoundthatthehouseholdhadrecoveredits equanimity Theyhadfearedatfirstsomeseriousconsequencesasaresultofthe fightatthechâteau,withthreepeoplelyingdeadthere ButtheFrenchmanhad apparentlydecidedthathisownpreciousskinwouldbesaferifthematterwere hushed up with as little ado as possible He did not know, it appeared, that BaxterhadnotbeenkilledbytheshotfromBoris'srevolver,andhehadnowish to admit any connection with that affair Accordingly, as Peter learned later, Virot had reported to the authorities that Boris had shot Madame Estelle and Michael during a fit of jealousy, and then, seized with remorse, had taken his ownlife ThewholebearingofMademoiselleVseslavitchandherbrotherhadchanged— Paul noticed that immediately Now that with Boris's death the cause of their former disquiet had been removed forever they were two entirely different persons ItmadePaul'sheartgladtohearthebuoyantnoteinNatalie'svoiceas shetalkedwiththemgaily Andhisownspiritsroseaswell,fornow,hethought, theobstacletohissuithadbeenbrushedaside That day passed quickly, for there was much to talk about Alexis Vseslavitch wasstillthere,forhehadrefusedtoleavewhilePaulseemedinanydanger And thefourdiscussedatlengththeeventsofthosetwomemorablenights That night Paul went once more with Natalie to the garden As the soft night receivedtheminitswarmembrace,itseemedtoPaulthatinthatspotlayallthe gloryoftheearth,andawholeHeavenbesides Forveryjoy,hecouldhavedied whilelookingintohereyes Howmadlyhelovedher!Howbeautifulshewas! As he gazed at her pale face, shining forth from her dark tresses, it seemed to Paul like the very moon above, gleaming from the dusky clouds He took her cool hand and pressed it to his eyes, till the ringing in his heart was still All natureseemedenchanted Foratime,Paulcouldnotspeak Heonlyknewthat God had created men to admire the glories of the world, and that here was a wonderfulnight—andanolesswonderfulwoman Oncemoretheysatdownuponthebenchwheretheyhadtalkedtwoshortdays before—butwhatadifference!Thenhisheartwassorelytroubled—nowallwas peace Likeaseaoflife,Springcoveredtheworld Thesnowyblossom-foamfluttered onthetrees;allwasbathedinawondroushazyglow Everywheremiracleswere working AndthenPaulawokefromhisdreamandspoke "Natalie!"hesaid,"Icannotpartfromyou IhavetoldyouthatIloveyou."And thenwithmoisteyesandflaminglipshecried:"Bemine—andloveme!" Oh!thenfelltheeveninggolduponPaul'ssoul!Likeafairybellcamethesound ofhervoiceuponhisears: "MyKnightofLove,"shesaid,"whatwouldstthouhavemore?" Andatthosewords,Paulfoldedherwithinhisarms Later as they sat there in the moonlight, she told Paul more of the unworthy marriage which had been so nearly forced upon her; how Boris being heirapparentofaBalkanstate—Sovna—hadbeenabletoenlistthehelpoftheTsar in coercing her Many of the Sovnian subjects were Slavs who had emigrated fromherownprovinceandtheTsarfeltthatsuchaunionwoulddomuchtoward cementing the friendship between the two countries As for Boris, political reasonshadlittletodowiththesuit Herfortunewasallhecaredfor Andatthe thoughtofhisperfidy,sonearlytriumphant,shetrembledanewwithhorror And then as Paul comforted her, he told her with amusement how he had interpretedthenotethatshehadwrittenhiminParis—thathehadthoughthera secretagentoftheDalmatiangovernment Theladylaughedatthat "Andwhen,pray,were you disillusioned?"she askedhim "Twodaysago you calledme'Princess'—inthegardenhere Howdidyouknowthat?" Paullookedatherinamazement "Princess!"herepeated Andthenherememberedthathehadusedtheword—as anendearingname,thatseemedsowelltofithislove "Whatdoyoumean,myNatalie?"hecried "Areyoureallyofroyalblood?" "Yes,Paul,"sheanswered "Youdidnotknowitthen?Iwantedtoappeartoyou asacommoner—justanormal,everydaywoman Andsee!youlovedmewhen youthoughtIwasamereservant!Thatisthewonderfulpartofitalltome." Yet Paul's heart sank as the possible meaning of the news started forth to his consciousness Wasnotherrankanimpassablebarrierbetweenthem?heasked himself MustheagainreturntoEnglandtodragouttherestoflifealone,with hislovethewidthofacontinentaway? Heaskedthesethingswitharushofwordsthatfellfromhistremblinglips "Ah, Paul!" the lady said, caressingly, "fear not I am tired of being only a princess!Theworldseesbuttheglitteringshowofroyalty,anddoesnotknowit fortheshamitreallyis Thetrappings,thegorgeousrobesthatkingsandqueens assume when they are crowned hide bleeding hearts and sorrowful breasts I have seen too much of the cares of state—the awful tragedy—the bitter grief LongsinceIdecidedthatIwouldhavenomoreofit Betteradinnerofherbs, whereloveis,youknow AndsoPeterandIcameheretothisquietspot—the oldhomeofmymother—andtookhername Andherewethoughttolivelike simplegentle-folk,tillBorisbrokerudelyintoourArcadia "Andnow,Paul,"shecontinued,lookingupathimwiththelove-lightshiningin hereyes,"thetimehascomewhenyoumayknowall Forgiveme,dear,forthe longwaiting ButIhadtobesureasyouwillsee." Shedrewfromherbosomafoldedpaperandplaceditinhishand Paulopenedit,andsawitwasaletter Hehelditcloser,andthen,inthewhite moonlightpouringfromthatSouthernsky—greatGod!—hesawthewritingof hisLadyofLongAgo! AndthisiswhatPaulread: "MYSWEETSISTER: "IknowthatImustleavethisbeautifulearth AlreadyIfeelbesideme,waking as well as sleeping, a mysterious presence, who lays his cold hand upon my naked breast, and claims me for his own It is Death, my Natalie, that stalks beside me, and that day is not far distant when his icy fingers will close relentlesslyuponmyquiveringheart—anditwillbeatnomore "Ah!mylittleone,GodkeeptheesafefromsuchgriefsasIhaveborne ButGod granttheethehappinessIhavealsoknown "Andnow,child,Imusttalktotheeastothewomanthouwiltbewhenthydear eyes read these words—a score of years from now! Thou wilt be a beautiful womanthen—andI—alittledustwillstillremain,perhaps "But, listen My son, the baby Prince—thou wilt watch over him with tender care,Iknow Andthen—fortheethetimewillpassquickly,whileIlieslowly crumbling—beforethouknowestit,almost,hewillbeaman—andcrowned "Then,Natalie,thouwiltreadthismessagefromthelivingdead,forfromthat timeonPaulVerdaynewillneedthee Heismytruelover,sweetheart,andwhen hissonissetapartfromhislifeforeverbythenecessitiesofstate—thenwillhe know his hour of greatest need Search him out, Natalie, my sister—Paul Verdayne,theEnglishman "Go to Lucerne, in May (and here followed the name of the Swiss hotel Paul knewsowell)andtherethouwiltfindhim,withoutfail "Comforthim,Ichargethee Itmusteverbefortheeasacredduty And,child!I would not have my lover left alone, to go through life with the shadow of his greatgriefhangingeveroverhim Therewillstillbesunlightintheworld—and love AndPaulwillbeinhisprime "Thenwillitbethehighnoonofhislife Butwhatoflove,forhim?Ah!Iscarce daredreamthatdream Butbelievethis,sweetNatalie,Deathwouldlosehalfits dreadcouldIbutknowthatPaulandthoucouldstlove." Paul sat like one who saw a vision Unknowingly he plucked the young buds from the rose-tree by the bench—and crushed them Far away mourned a delirious nightingale; and a weeping willow softly shivered The moon looked down from the midst of heaven; the infinite celestial vault increased until it became yet more infinite; it burned and breathed; all the earth gleamed with silvery lustre; the air was wonderful, at once fresh and overpowering, full of sweetness;itwasanoceanofperfumes Divine night! Magical night! The forests, full of shade, were motionless, and cast their vast shadows The pools were calm; the cold and darkness of the waters lay mournfully enclosed in the dark walls of the garden The virgin thickets of young cherry trees timidly stretched their roots into the chill earth, and from time to time shook their leaves, as if they were angry and indignant that the beautiful Zephyr, the wind of night, glided suddenly toward them and coveredthemwithkisses All the landscape slept On high all breathed—all was beautiful—solemn The vastnessandwondrousnesspossessedPaul'ssoul;andcrowdsofsilveryvisions emergedsoftlyfromtheirhidingplaces Divinenight!Magicalnight! Suddenlyallcametolife;theforests,thepools,thesteppes Themajesticvoice ofthenightingaleburstforthagain,nowinapaeonofpraise Itseemedasifthe moon,tolistentoit,stoodstillinthemidstofheaven Thenthesongceased All wassilent Paul and his lady rose then, and hand in hand, walking softly as if in the presenceofonethatwasnotdead,butsleeping,theysoughtthehousetogether Andastheyreachedthedoorway,Paulsawthereforthefirsttime,inscribedon thelintelinlettersofgold,nowstrangelysilveredinthatmarvellouslight: "OnthyhousewilltheblessingoftheLordrestforevermore." 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